2014/08/12

22/50 – Workflow Presets Now Available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

Workflow presets are now available for defining and then quickly choosing different workflow settings in Camera Raw. Click on the Workflow settings (the hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw dialog) to access the options then, after creating your custom presets and exiting the workflow settings, Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) the workflow link to quickly switch between your saved presets. This video will show you how.

 

5:47 AM Permalink
2014/08/11

21/50 – The Crop Tool, Workflow Options and Image Size in Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop CC

The Crop tool’s behavior has been modified so that it is now solely responsible for defining the aspect ratio of the image and the Workflow options are responsible for determining the actual image size. For example, in order to create an image that is 8 x 10 inches at 300 ppi, click and hold the Crop tool to select 4 to 5 from the list of aspect ratios and crop  the image as desired. Then, using the Workflow Options (accessed via the blue hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw window), check the Resize to Fit option. Select Short Size from the drop down menu and enter 8 inches and a resolution 300 ppi. See how it works in the video below:

Shortcut – tapping the “X” key when using the Crop Tool toggles the aspect ratio from landscape to portrait and vice-versa.

5:40 AM Permalink
2014/08/08

20/50 – Camera Shake Reduction as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC

For anyone that has had to try to “salvage” a photograph that just wasn’t quite sharp enough, Photoshop’s Camera Shake Reduction filter can help remedy the situation. Check out the video below to see how Photoshop can help sharpen images with camera motion caused by slow shutter speeds or long focal lengths (i.e. the camera moves while capturing the image, not the subject).

5:13 AM Permalink
2014/08/07

19/50 – Font Search, Instant Type Preview and Typkit Features in Photoshop CC

The 2014 Release of Photoshop CC added additional typographic features including font search, instant font preview and integration with Typekit better than ever. Check out these features and more in the video below.

5:15 AM Permalink
2014/08/06

18/50 – Typekit Font Matching in Photoshop CC

If you work with type in Photoshop, then chances are that at some point in your career, you’ve tried to open a document that was handed off to you, only to find that you didn’t have the same fonts installed as the creator of the document. Let’s take a look at how Photoshop CC has improved this workflow.
In previous versions of Photoshop, when opening a document that utilized fonts that are not installed on the current system, Photoshop notified you that there were missing fonts, but that was all. Now, when you open a document and there are missing fonts, Photoshop will look for an exact match using Typekit. If it finds a match, it asks you if you want to replace it. If it doesn’t find a match, Typekit will display your default font as well as other fonts that are being used in the document so that you can choose an acceptable replacement.
2014_07_30_Typekit

Note, for this to work, TypeKit “Font Sync” must be turned on (CC desktop App > Preferences > Fonts > Typekit = On)

4:53 AM Permalink
2014/08/05

17/50 – System Font Matching and Sub Pixel Rendering in Photoshop CC

In order to render type in Photoshop which will match the operating system, Photoshop CC introduced new anti-aliasing options. Selecting the Type tool and choosing the font matching option (MAC or MAC LCD on Macintosh, Windows or Windows LCD on Windows) from the Options bar (or the application menu: Type > Anti-Alias), enables text rendered in Photoshop to look the same as the browsers on their respective operating systems. However, selecting these options does give up fonts looking the same cross platform, so don’t use the system font matching options if you’re doing print work and want cross platform compatibility.
In addition, Photoshop CC does sub pixel rendering on the system and the gamma value for text is automatically set for new system options.

5:49 AM Permalink
2014/08/04

16/50 – Setting Default Type Styles in Photoshop CC

In Photoshop CS6, the engineering team added the ability to create Type styles to make working with text in Photoshop much more efficient. In Photoshop CC, they added additional functionality including the ability to set default Type styles. This video explains the details:

I thought it might be helpful to include a few additional notes to clarify what will happen (the default behavior) when working with default type styles in different scenarios:

• If you choose “Save Default Type Styles” from the Type menu, it will REPLACE your existing default type styles if they exist, or create them if they do not.

• After defining default type styles, every time you create a new document, those default type styles will be automatically loaded into the new document.

• If you open an existing document without any defined styles, Photoshop will automatically load the default type styles.

• If you open an existing document that HAS type styles defined, Photoshop will NOT load the default set. (You can choose to load them manually – see next bullet.)

• If you choose “Load Default Type Styles”, it will APPEND the default styles to any type styles already defined in the document. However, if there is a type style with the same name, it does not load that default type style.

• After loading the default styles in a document, they are saved with the document. If you later change the default styles, this will not update the styles in previous documents.

• If you need different sets of type styles for different projects/clients, you will need to define those type style sets in separate Photoshop files and then load the appropriate set each time you begin work for that project/client.

If you’re new to Type Styles, this video will quickly get you up to speed:

5:46 AM Permalink
2014/08/01

15/50 – Using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC to Create a High Dynamic Range ( HDR) Image

In the video below, we’re going to discover how easy it is to take multiple, bracketed exposures of the same scene and combine them into a single 32-bit HDR image that can then be edited nondestructively using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC. In addition, we’ll discover how powerful Camera Raw can be when applied to multiple layers as a Smart Object.

And just in case I wasn’t clear in the video, I want to point out why Adobe would include Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop CC. Well, here are the first three reasons that I can think of, but I’m sure that there are more!
• First of all, not everyone had the luxury of working with raw files so it can be a huge benefit to be able to apply options like clarity and perspective correction to non raw images (a Photoshop layer for example).
• Sometimes we forget to do things in the right order and we don’t have time to go back to the beginning and fix them when on deadline. Yes, this might not be optimal, and yes, we would be better off making changes earlier in our workflow (processing our raw files directly in Camera Raw before opening them in Photoshop), but Camera Raw as a filter can help to make corrections or add creative effects to layers later in your workflow and/or with legacy files.
• Camera Raw as a filter can be applied to multiple layers at one time (by selecting multiple layers in the Layers panel and converting them to a single Smart Object). Plus, working with Camera Raw as a Smart Filter enables blend mode and opacity options as well as a Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the filter.
Additional information can be found in this post.
Note: The following features are not available when using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter (that are normally available in Camera Raw), primarily because they don’t make sense in the filter context: Workflow options and preferences, crop and straighten tools, rotation tools (rotate left/right buttons), snapshots, camera and lens profile corrections.

5:06 AM Permalink
2014/07/31

14/50 – Additional Secrets of the Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal Tool) in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

In the video below, we can see that the Camera Raw team has made even more refinements to the  Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal Tool) in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC.  These improvements include a new Feather slider to control the softness of the edge when cloning or healing areas of an image as well as improvements in the way that the Advanced Healing Brush determines the auto source location (the area that it clones/heals from), so that it now works better for images with textured areas. And, if the image has been cropped, the Advanced Healing Brush will bias the selection of the auto source location from within the crop rectangle (as opposed to auto-choosing image areas outside the crop). Note: tapping the Forward Slash key (/) will automatically select a new source for the selected circle or brush spot.

5:51 AM Permalink
2014/07/30

Camera Raw 8.6 and Lightroom 5.6 Now Available!

For more information on Camera Raw 8.6 and Lightroom 5.6 – including new camera support and bug fixes – please view the release notes on the Lightroom Journal blog. Or, click here for Camera Raw and click here for Lightroom.

9:21 PM Permalink

13/50 – The Advanced Healing Brush in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

The video below demonstrates the new features added to the Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal) tool in Adobe Camera Raw. Also check out the shortcuts below to take full advantage of the features!

• Tap the “B” key to select the Advanced Healing Brush tool.

• Tap the “V” key to toggle the visibility of the spot overlays.

• Shift -drag constrains the brush spot to a horizontal or vertical stroke.

• Shift -click connects the selected spot with the new spot via a straight brush stroke.

• Command -drag (Mac) | Control -drag (Win)  will create a circle spot and allow you to drag to define the source.

• Tap the Forward Slash key (/) to select new source for existing circle or brush spot.

• Press Delete to delete a selected spot.

• Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on a spot to delete it (the cursor will change to a pair of scissors).

• Option -drag (Mac) | Alt  -drag (Win) in the image area over multiple spots to batch-delete (the icon changes to a marquee while dragging.

• Tap the “Y” key to toggle on/off Visualize spots. Note – this is also available as a checkbox and slider in Toolbar.

• Tap the left and right brackets to increase / decrease your brush size. Add the Shift key to increase / decrease the feather.

8:00 AM Permalink
2014/07/29

12/50 – The Graduated and Radial Filter’s New Brush Feature in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

As some of you might have noticed, the video in yesterday’s post (demonstrating the Radial Filter in Camera Raw) didn’t include the incredible new Filter Brush, which can be used to selectively hide the effects of either the Radial or Graduated Filter in an image. Below is an example of the new technology. This first illustration is the original image.

2014_05_22Original Image

In the image below, a Graduated filter was added to darken the sky. However the effect is also applied to the top of the mountains because they are also affected by the Graduated filter.

2014_05_22GradFilter

To remove the effect in the top of the mountains, with the Gradient Filter selected, choose the Brush option. The Brush options include Size, Feather and Flow as well as Auto Mask (used to automatically detect edges based on contrast and color) and Clear (to remove Brush overrides).

2014_05_Brush

The image below shows the result from using the Graduated Filter Brush to paint out the effect in the mountains while still retaining the effect in the sky area.

2014_05_22GradFilterMask

And two more super shortcuts:

• To keep the Graduated and Radial filters eraser size the same as the brush, click the flyout menu (to the right of the Graduated/Radial Filter panel header), and toggle “Separate Eraser Size” from the menu.

• When a Graduated or Radial Filter instance is selected, Shift-K can be used to enter and leave brush modification mode.

6:30 AM Permalink
2014/07/28

11/50 – The Radial Filter in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

The video below demonstrates the Radial Filter in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC. Additional tips and shortcuts for working with the Radial Filter are below.

• Tap the “J” key to select the Radial Filter

• The Shift key will constrain the Radial Filter to a circle.

• Tapping the “V” key will toggle the overlay of the Radial Filter interface (bounding box).

• Tapping the “Y” key will toggle the overlay of the Radial Filter mask.

• While dragging one of the four handles of an existing Radial Filter to resize it, press the Shift key to preserve the aspect ratio of the ellipse.

• While dragging the boundary of an existing Radial Filter to rotate it, press the Shift key to snap the rotation to 15-degree increments.

• While dragging to create a new Radial Filter, press and hold the Space bar to move the ellipse; release the Space bar to resume defining the shape of the new Radial Filter.

• While dragging inside of an existing Radial Filter to move it, press the Shift key to constrain the movement to the horizontal or vertical direction.

• You can drag a Radial Filter beyond the image area.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the Delete key to delete the Radial Filter.

• Double-click in the image area to set the bounding box of the Radial filter to the image bounds.

• Double-click inside of an existing Radial Filter to expand the bounding box of the Radial Filter to the image bounds. Or, Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) on the Radial Filter pin and select Fill Image to expand the Radial filter to the image bounds.

• Command + Option -drag (Mac) | Control + Alt -drag (Win) to duplicate the Radial Filter.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the X key to toggle the effect direction from outside to inside.

7:30 AM Permalink
2014/07/25

10/50 – Sync Upright’s Numeric Transforms in Camera Raw

Often I have found that I want to apply perspective correction to multiple files at once using the Upright feature in Camera Raw. But depending on the results I want to achieve, it’s best to know that there are two different ways of accomplishing this. Note: For both methods, it is recommended that you first enable Lens Profile Corrections and  Remove Chromatic Aberration using the Lens Corrections panel in Camera Raw.

METHOD ONE  – in the first situation, you might have a series of unrelated images that all need to have their own set of perspective corrections made to them. In this case, the easiest way to apply Upright would be to:

• Select all of the desired files in Camera Raw. Then in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel (where the Upright controls are) click the desired Upright mode (Auto, Level, Vertical, or Full) in order to apply the perspective correction to all selected files.

Here all of the images are selected, then the Upright mode is applied.

Here all of the images are selected in the filmstrip, then the Upright mode is applied.

• With this method, each image is analyzed individually and the perspective corrected.

Note: if you prefer not to select all of the files first (or have additional settings in other panels that you want to synchronize to multiple selected images), you can select the first file and apply the desired changes including the Upright mode. Then, add the other images to your selection and click the Synchronize button. In the Synchronize dialog, check the settings you want, plus Transform. And, if you do this often, you may want to consider creating a preset to apply an Upright transformation mode.

METHOD TWO – in the second situation, you might have a series of related images – such as a sequence of bracketed exposures or a set of time lapse images for which you need the same exact numeric perspective corrections made to each image. In this scenario, you don’t want to run the upright analysis on each individual image because Upright is likely to return a slightly different result on each of the images in the selection. Instead, what you want to do is have the upright analysis be performed on one of the images, and then have the result of that analysis (the numeric transformation) synchronized across the other images in the set.

In order to do this,  select the first image of the series (in this case one of several exposures necessary to create a single HDR image) and apply the desired Upright transformation option.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Then, add the additional images to your selection and, in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel, click the Sync Results hyperlink.

All images in the Filmstrip are selected and the becomes available.

With all of the images in the series selected in the filmstrip, the Sync Results hyperlink becomes available..

With multiple images selected, Camera Raw will copy Upright’s numerical transformations from the primary image to the other selected images.

5:24 AM Permalink
2014/07/24

9/50 – Upright Perspective Corrections in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

In the video below, discover how to use Camera Raw’s Upright modes to fix common problems in photographs such as tilted horizons and converging verticals in buildings.

Shortcut: in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual subpanel, press Control-Tab to cycle through the Upright options from left to right. Add the Shift key to move from right to left.

5:22 AM Permalink