Posts tagged "Adobe Camera Raw and DNG"

July 24, 2013

Soft Proofing Now Available in Adobe Camera Raw 8.1 for Photoshop CC

Camera Raw 8.1 now includes the ability to select RGB, CMYK and LAB ICC profiles to soft proof images. To select a profile, click the workflow Options (accessed via the blue hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw window) and in the Color Space section, choose the Space from the pop-down menu. Once a profile is selected, Camera Raw displays a “soft proof” of that image.  In addition you have the ability to choose either Perceptual or Relative as your rendering Intent and can choose whether or not to Simulate Paper and Ink.

Note: For accurate results, monitor calibration is a must! In addition, there may very well be some colors that simply aren’t reproducible on a monitor that can be printed and vice versa.

5:12 AM Permalink
July 22, 2013

Cropping Images in Adobe Camera Raw 8.1 with Photoshop CC

The Crop tool’s behavior has been modified within Camera Raw 8.1. The Crop tool is now solely responsible for defining the aspect ratio of the crop and the Workflow Options are now responsible for determining the image size. For example, in order to create an image that is 8 x 10 inches at 300 ppi, click and hold the Crop tool to select 4 to 5 from the list of aspect ratios and drag the crop in the image as desired. Then, using the Workflow Options (accessed via the blue hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw window), check the Resize to Fit option. Select Short Size from the drop down menu and enter 8 inches and a resolution 300 ppi.

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5:02 AM Permalink
June 26, 2013

Merge to HDR Pro in Photoshop CC

There is a new feature when working in the Merge to HDR Pro feature in Photoshop CC. If you set the Mode to 32 bit, under the histogram is an option to “Complete Toning in Adobe Camera Raw”.

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Enabling this option, changes the “OK” button to “Tone in ACR”. Clicking “Tone in ACR” tells Photoshop to convert the 32 bit HDR layer into a Smart Object and automatically apply Camera Raw as a Smart Filter.

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Then, simply apply your desired settings in the Camera Raw Filter and click OK. Because you are working with a smart object, not only can you double click the layer thumbnail to re-edit the Camera Raw options, but you can also use the Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the effect AND change the Blend Mode and Opacity of the filter!

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Note: only the following Blend Modes are available when using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter: Normal, Dissolve, Darken, Multiply, Darker Color, Lighten, Linear Dodge (add), Lighter Color, Difference, Subtract, Divide, Hue, Saturation Color and Luminosity.

5:38 AM Permalink
June 24, 2013

Upright Perspective Corrections in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

In the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual subpanel, press Control-Tab to cycle through the Upright options from left to right. Add the Shift key to move from right to left.

 

5:30 AM Permalink
June 20, 2013

Adobe Camera Raw as a Filter in Photoshop CC

I have received several questions as to why Adobe would include Camera Raw as a Filter in Photoshop CC. Well, here are the first three reasons that I can think of, but I’m sure that there are more!

• First of all, not everyone had the luxury of working with raw files so it can be a huge benefit to be able to apply options like clarity and perspective correction to non raw images (a photoshop layer for example).

• Sometimes we forget to do things in the right order and we don’t have time to go back to the beginning and fix them when on deadline. Yes, this might not be optimal, and yes, we would be better off making changes earlier in our workflow (processing our raw files directly in camera raw before opening them in Photoshop), but ACR as a filter can help to make corrections or add creative effects to layers later in your workflow and/or with legacy files.

• ACR as a filter can be applied to multiple layers at one time if you select those layers in the Layers panel and convert them to a smart object. Plus, working with Camera Raw as a smart filter enables blend mode and opacity options as well as the Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the filter.

Note: There are several features from regular Adobe Camera Raw that are omitted from Camera Raw as a filter, mostly because they don’t make sense in the filter context.

• Workflow options and preferences

• Crop  and  straighten tools

• Rotation tools (rotate left/right buttons)

• Snapshots

• Camera and lens profile

• ACR as Smart Object, save button

5:11 AM Permalink
June 19, 2013

The Radial Filter in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

I mention a number of shortcuts that are new to the Radial Filter (J) in this video (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), but thought that it might be handy to also include them in list form:

• The Shift key will constrain the Radial Filter to a circle.

• Tapping the “V” key will toggle the overlay of the Radial Filter interface (bounding box).

• While dragging one of the four handles of an existing Radial Filter to resize it, press the Shift key to preserve the aspect ratio of the ellipse.

• While dragging the boundary of an existing Radial Filter to rotate it, press the Shift key to snap the rotation to 15-degree increments.

• While dragging to create a new Radial Filter, press and hold the Space bar to move the ellipse; release the Space bar to resume defining the shape of the new Radial Filter.

• While dragging inside of an existing Radial Filter to move it, press the Shift key to constrain the movement to the horizontal or vertical direction.

• You can drag a Radial Filter beyond the image area.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the Delete key to delete the Radial Filter.

• Double-click in the image area to set the bounding box of the Radial filter to the image bounds.

• Double-click inside of an existing Radial Filter to expand the bounding box of the Radial Filter to the image bounds.

• Command + Option -drag (Mac) | Control + Alt -drag (Win) to duplicate the Radial Filter.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the X key to toggle the effect direction from outside to inside.

 

5:00 AM Permalink
May 7, 2013

Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers

As many of you  know, this morning Adobe announced Photoshop CC. Although it’s not yet shipping, here is a video of my favorite features that will be available soon!

In this episode (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), Julieanne Kost will demonstrate her top 5 favorite features in Photoshop CC including the new Upright perspective correction, Radial Filter, and Spot Removal  features in Adobe Camera Raw 8, Image Upsampling and Smart Sharpening, Live Shapes for Rounded Rectangles, and Camera Shake Reduction.

If you own Photoshop CS6 and are moving to Photoshop CC, you might also want to watch this video (Julieanne’s Top 5 Features for Photographers in Photoshop 13.1 ), to learn about the new features that were added to Photoshop 13.1 (released back in December exclusively for Creative Cloud Members).

In addition, here is a great article with insights about Breaking from Tradition written by Maria Yap, Sr. Director of Product Management at Adobe.

And if you have questions, Jeff Tranberry provides answers in this FAQ – for Photoshop and Lightroom Customers.

And the Creative Cloud FAQ.

And information about Lightroom and Creative Cloud.

6:30 AM Permalink
April 4, 2013

Removing and Adding Vignetting in Lightroom and Camera Raw

When applying a Post Crop Vignette in Lightroom and/or Camera Raw, don’t forget that you can use the Highlight slider to suppress the vignette from being added in the highlights of the image. This can help keep brighter values in the vignetted area from looking muddy.

Also, when cropping an image and adding a Post Crop vignette, I prefer to first use the Lens Correction panel to remove any vignetting caused by the lens. Removing the lens vignetting (especially if the image is cropped so that part of the lens vignette is cut off) will result in a more even looking Post Crop Vignette.

5:02 AM Permalink
March 14, 2013

Per Channel Clipping Warnings in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop

In Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop, The Clipping Warning triangles turn different colors to show that different channels are being clipped.

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If no values are clipped, the triangles are black.

If values are clipped in the red channel the triangles are red.

If values are clipped in the green channel the triangles are green.

If values are clipped in the blue channel the triangles are blue.

If values are clipped in the red + green channel the triangles are yellow.

If values are clipped in the red + blue channel the triangles are magenta.

If values are clipped in the green + blue channel the triangles are cyan.

If values are clipped in all channels, the triangles are white.

Note: to view per channel clipping in the Image Preview area, Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) – drag the Exposure, Highlight, Shadow, White or Black sliders in the Basic Panel.

5:08 AM Permalink
March 13, 2013

Video Tutorial – Controlling Selective Color Changes in Lightroom

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Controlling Selective Color Changes in Lightroom), Julieanne demonstrates how to use Hue, Saturation, Luminance and the Adjustment Brush to selectively control color in Lighroom. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.

 

 

5:15 AM Permalink
March 11, 2013

How to Extract a Raw File with Modified Settings from a Smart Object in Photoshop

After posting my video Cyclical – The Creative Process I received a great question: If you start in Lightroom with a raw file and choose Photo > Edit In > Open  in Photoshop as Smart Object, and then edit that Smart Object, how can you “extract” that raw file  with the edited settings?

My first thought was to select the Smart Object in the Layers panel in Photoshop and choose Layer > Smart Objects > Export Contents. But surprisingly that method doesn’t export any edits made to the Smart Object. However, it turns out that the answer is even easier.  In Photoshop, simply double click on the Smart Object’s thumbnail in the Layers panel (or choose Layer > Smart Object > Edit Contents) and, in the Camera Raw dialog, click the Save Image button in the lower left corner. Voila.

 

5:46 AM Permalink
October 16, 2012

Changes Made to JPEG Files in Lightroom and Photoshop

If you capture images as JPEGs, and then make changes to JPEG files in the Develop Module (or in Quick Develop) in Lightroom or in Camera Raw in Photoshop ,and post those original JPEG files online, the adjustment changes will not be displayed. You must have Lightroom or Photoshop render a new version of the JPEG with your changes applied (via Export, the output modules and/or publish services).

Why? Well, when you make changes to your files in Lightroom (or Camera Raw), you can choose to push settings such as copyright and keywords into JPEG files. In Lightroom you do this by choosing Metadata > Save Metadata to File or by checking “Automatically write changes to XMP” in Catalog Settings > Metadata. In Photoshop, you add your information in File Info or in the appropriate panels in Bridge. Most other programs, (if they’re savvy enough to read IPTC data) can read information such as copyright and keyword and display this information.

But other programs (including browsers) are not able to read changes made in Quick Develop or in the Develop Module in Lightroom or in Camera Raw in Photoshop and render it, so you need  to export your modified files (in order to render a new file with the changes applied) and post those files instead of the original JPEGs.

5:03 AM Permalink
October 10, 2012

Video Tutorial – The Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush

In this episode of The Complete Picture (The Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush), discover the power of making selective adjustments like dodging and burning, color corrections and noise removal using the Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.

 

8:11 AM Permalink
August 21, 2012

Vibrance and Saturation in Photoshop and Lightroom

There are two sliders in the Basic panel (in the Develop module in Lightroom and in the Camera Raw dialog in Photoshop), which can be used to quickly adjust color – Vibrance and Saturation. Lately I have overheard a number of people “arguing” over which adjustment is better. So to put that argument to rest, I’m going to say that both adjustments have their strengths!  Although I will agree that it’s a good rule of thumb to use the Vibrance slider to increase (or decrease) saturation in images (especially portraits because not only is Vibrance a relative slider, it is also biased to leave “skin-tones” alone), there are also times when I prefer to use Saturation to set the mood in my images. In fact, there are many times when I use a combination of BOTH sliders to reduce colors that are too overbearing – I will make a negative adjustment using Vibrance and then increase the resulting (more “even” color palette) with Saturation. Since the sliders are nondestructive don’t be afraid to experiment!

(Yes, sometimes I run with scissors too. )

5:10 AM Permalink
August 15, 2012

White Balance Settings for RAW and JPEG Files

The units of measurements displayed in the Basic panel (in Lightroom’s Develop module and in the Camera Raw dialog in Photoshop) for Temperature and Tint differ between RAW and JPEG files. When working with a raw file, the Temperature slider ranges from 2,000 to 50,000 Kelvin and the Tint sliders range from -150 to 150. When working with JPEG files (or other pixel based files such as PSD or TIFF) the Temperature and Tint sliders both range from -100 to 100.

You might also notice that when working with RAW files, Lightroom displays a list of “preset” White Balance settings (Auto, Daylight, Cloudy, Tungsten etc. – this list might differ slightly from camera to camera). When you work with a JPEG file, LIghtroom only displays As Shot, Auto and Custom in the pull-down menu

5:06 AM Permalink