Posts tagged "Adobe Camera Raw and DNG"

July 25, 2014

10/50 – Sync Upright’s Numeric Transforms in Camera Raw

Often I have found that I want to apply perspective correction to multiple files at once using the Upright feature in Camera Raw. But depending on the results I want to achieve, it’s best to know that there are two different ways of accomplishing this. Note: For both methods, it is recommended that you first enable Lens Profile Corrections and  Remove Chromatic Aberration using the Lens Corrections panel in Camera Raw.

METHOD ONE  – in the first situation, you might have a series of unrelated images that all need to have their own set of perspective corrections made to them. In this case, the easiest way to apply Upright would be to:

• Select all of the desired files in Camera Raw. Then in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel (where the Upright controls are) click the desired Upright mode (Auto, Level, Vertical, or Full) in order to apply the perspective correction to all selected files.

Here all of the images are selected, then the Upright mode is applied.

Here all of the images are selected in the filmstrip, then the Upright mode is applied.

• With this method, each image is analyzed individually and the perspective corrected.

Note: if you prefer not to select all of the files first (or have additional settings in other panels that you want to synchronize to multiple selected images), you can select the first file and apply the desired changes including the Upright mode. Then, add the other images to your selection and click the Synchronize button. In the Synchronize dialog, check the settings you want, plus Transform. And, if you do this often, you may want to consider creating a preset to apply an Upright transformation mode.

METHOD TWO – in the second situation, you might have a series of related images – such as a sequence of bracketed exposures or a set of time lapse images for which you need the same exact numeric perspective corrections made to each image. In this scenario, you don’t want to run the upright analysis on each individual image because Upright is likely to return a slightly different result on each of the images in the selection. Instead, what you want to do is have the upright analysis be performed on one of the images, and then have the result of that analysis (the numeric transformation) synchronized across the other images in the set.

In order to do this,  select the first image of the series (in this case one of several exposures necessary to create a single HDR image) and apply the desired Upright transformation option.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Then, add the additional images to your selection and, in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel, click the Sync Results hyperlink.

All images in the Filmstrip are selected and the becomes available.

With all of the images in the series selected in the filmstrip, the Sync Results hyperlink becomes available..

With multiple images selected, Camera Raw will copy Upright’s numerical transformations from the primary image to the other selected images.

5:24 AM Permalink
July 24, 2014

9/50 – Upright Perspective Corrections in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

In the video below, discover how to use Camera Raw’s Upright modes to fix common problems in photographs such as tilted horizons and converging verticals in buildings.

Shortcut: in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual subpanel, press Control-Tab to cycle through the Upright options from left to right. Add the Shift key to move from right to left.

5:22 AM Permalink
June 18, 2014

Adobe Announces Largest Software Release Since CS6

Today Adobe announced all new versions of 14 CC desktop applications, 4 new mobile apps, the immediate availability of creative hardware, and new offerings for Enterprise, education and photography customers.

Of course this includes new features, enhancements and updates to both Photoshop and Lightroom for design and photography including the new Spin and Path Blurs in Blur Gallery, new typographic controls including Font Search and Typekit integration, enhancements to Smart Objects, Smart Guides, and Layer Comps, improved Content-Aware technologies, new selection capabilities using Focus Mask, as well as hidden gems and workflow timesavers.

Check out the latest advancements in Photoshop CC in the videos below:

Photoshop CC (2014): New features and enhancements (3 minute overview)

How to Add Realistic Spinning Motion Blur Effects in Photoshop CC

Adding Motion Blur Effects Along a Path in Photoshop CC

New Typographic Features in Photoshop CC

How to Align and Distribute Layers using Smart Guides in Photoshop CC

How to Use Layer Comps for Multi State Mock-ups in Photoshop CC

New Smart Object Features in Photoshop CC

How to Remove Distracting Elements using the Enhanced Content Aware Tools in Photoshop CC

How to Use Focus Mask to Make Selections based on Focus in Photoshop CC

More Hidden Gems in Photoshop CC

In addition, Adobe Camera Raw 8.5 the Radial and Graduated Filters have a new Brush option designed to selectively hide the filter in unwanted areas. This example demonstrates how useful it can be. 

Plus, Camera Raw 8.5 has new Per-Panel Preview toggle button.

And of course the Camera Raw team included additional bug fixes, new camera and lens profile support.

Click here for more information about Adobe’s Announcement 
Click here for more the Creative Cloud FAQ
Click here for more information about Lightroom mobile for iPhone

If you have any questions or comments please feel free to share them on the Photoshop forums!

8:45 AM Permalink
June 16, 2014

When Do I Convert  RAW files to DNG?

Since people often ask me when I convert my files to DNG, I will admit that I don’t convert until after I am finished editing the images (including rating, keywording and developing them).  Why? Because, although I could convert on import, I throw away a fair amount of images in my editing process, and I figure that there’s no sense in wasting the time to convert files that I’m going to throw away.

Of course you don’t have to wait until the end of your workflow to convert your images, I just find it satisfying to convert as a final step. Plus, this way I know that any image that is a DNG has made it through my entire workflow.

Below are two videos with more information about DNG:

5:38 AM Permalink
June 4, 2014

Per-Panel Preview in Adobe Camera Raw 8.5

As a direct result of your feedback, ACR 8.5  has a new button designed to display a per-panel preview that is applied directly to the main view of the image! Clicking this button will reset the settings in the selected panel to their defaults. Clicking it again will reset them to the previous settings. Or, you can use the shortcut Command + Option + P (Mac) | Control + Alt + P (Win) to toggle the preview.

Image with per-panel preview toggled to reset panel to default settings.

Image with per-panel preview “Off” (modifications made to the HSL/Grayscale panel are visible in the image area).

Image with per-panel preview toggled to reset panel to default settings.

Image with per-panel preview toggled “On” (the HSL/Grayscale panel is set to the default settings).

Although the preview behavior might appear to look the same as it did in previous versions, this new button actually works a bit differently “under the hood”. Instead of simply showing and hiding the settings in a panel, this button actually resets the panel (clicking the button again restores the previous settings).

So, you might be asking why did we change the per-panel preview behavior? Well, since Camera Raw is not a database program (like Lightroom is), it can’t keep track of different “states” that a panel might be in. This means that in previous versions of Camera Raw, if you had toggled off the preview state of a panel, and then clicked “Done” or “Open Image”, Camera Raw would apply the slider values—even if the preview was turned off for that panel. Therefore, what you saw in Camera Raw may not have matched the resulting file. As you can imagine, when this mismatch occurred, it was not only confusing to the customer, but also unacceptable to the engineering team.

With this release, I believe the engineers have provided us with the best of both worlds; we can still use the new Before/After features (those are completely unchanged), as well as have an improved per-panel preview as a standalone feature.

5:04 AM Permalink
February 26, 2014

“Advanced Layer Tips” and “Automating Camera Raw” Classes Today on creativeLIVE

Join me today, Wednesday February 26th,  from 9:00 am – 10:30 am on creativeLIVE for 90 minutes of “Advanced Photoshop Layer Tips” during Photoshop Week. Then, stay tuned because from 10:45 am – 12:15 pm, I’ll be covering all sorts of tips and techniques to help speed up your workflow “Automating Camera Raw” in Photoshop. The best news, is that all of the courses are free during the live broadcast! And, if you’re in a different time zone, the sessions will be rebroadcast. See the complete schedule and RSVP here.

5:09 AM Permalink
November 19, 2013

Image Sizing Workflow Options in Camera Raw 8.2

There are two choices in the Image Sizing area of the Workflow Options in Camera Raw 8.2 that I didn’t understand the difference between: Width and Height and Dimensions. Well, thanks to Eric Chan, now I know!

• Width & Height: One would use this option to resize using both the image width and height. The width of the resized image will be limited to the unit specified in the “W” field, and the height of the resized image will be limited to the unit specified in the “H” field.

• Dimensions: This option is similar to the “Width & Height” described above, but it disregards the image orientation. That is, the longer edge of the resized image will be limited to the larger of the two specified units. Similarly, the shorter edge of the resized image will be limited to the smaller of the two specified units.

So now we all know. Thanks Eric.  : )

 

5:36 AM Permalink
October 25, 2013

Additional Soft Proofing Options in Camera Raw 8.2

I recently learned a few more tidbits about using the Soft Proofing options in Camera Raw 8.2. Thank you Eric!

• When using Soft Proofing options in the Workflow Settings in Camera Raw 8.2, you can choose the Rendering Intent as well whether or not to emulate Simulate Paper and Ink. However, there is not an option for Black Point Compensation because it is always enabled in Camera Raw.

• In addition, Grayscale color profiles will only appear in the Space popup when processing a monochrome image or when converting a color image to grayscale.

• And finally, when using a Lab or CMYK color space, the histogram and color readouts will change accordingly.

5:04 AM Permalink
October 9, 2013

Video Tutorial – Adobe Camera Raw 8.2 in Photoshop CC (v14.1)

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Adobe Camera Raw 8.2 in Photoshop CC (v14.1)), Julieanne takes a close look at the feature enhancements and refinements made to the Crop tool, workflow settings, and batch saving capabilities in Adobe Camera Raw.  In addition she also covers improvements made to the Spot Removal Tool, Noise Reduction, Local Adjustment Brush, and Histogram.

Note: For more information about the Features in Camera Raw 8.0 (PSCC V14), including the new Upright perspective correction, Radial Filter, and Spot Removal  features please see this video “Adobe Photoshop CC: Favorite Features for Photographers”.

7:15 AM Permalink
October 2, 2013

Sync Upright’s Numeric Transforms in Camera Raw

Often I have found that I want to apply perspective correction to multiple files at once using the Upright feature in Camera Raw. But depending on the results I want to achieve, it’s best to know that there are two different ways of accomplishing this. Note: For both methods, it is recommended that you first enable Lens Profile Corrections and  Remove Chromatic Aberration using the Lens Corrections panel in Camera Raw.

METHOD ONE  – in the first situation, you might have a series of unrelated images that all need to have their own set of perspective corrections made to them. In this case, the easiest way to apply Upright would be to:

• Select all of the desired files in Camera Raw. Then in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel (where the Upright controls are) click the desired Upright mode (Auto, Level, Vertical, or Full) in order to apply the perspective correction to all selected files.

Here all of the images are selected, then the Upright mode is applied.

Here all of the images are selected in the filmstrip, then the Upright mode is applied.

• With this method, each image is analyzed individually and the perspective corrected.

Note: if you prefer not to select all of the files first (or have additional settings in other panels that you want to synchronize to multiple selected images), you can select the first file and apply the desired changes including the Upright mode. Then, add the other images to your selection and click the Synchronize button. In the Synchronize dialog, check the settings you want, plus Transform. And, if you do this often, you may want to consider creating a preset to apply an Upright transformation mode.

METHOD TWO – in the second situation, you might have a series of related images – such as a sequence of bracketed exposures or a set of time lapse images for which you need the same exact numeric perspective corrections made to each image. In this scenario, you don’t want to run the upright analysis on each individual image because Upright is likely to return a slightly different result on each of the images in the selection. Instead, what you want to do is have the upright analysis be performed on one of the images, and then have the result of that analysis (the numeric transformation) synchronized across the other images in the set.

In order to do this,  select the first image of the series (in this case one of several exposures necessary to create a single HDR image) and apply the desired Upright transformation option.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Then, add the additional images to your selection and, in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel, click the Sync Results hyperlink.

All images in the Filmstrip are selected and the becomes available.

With all of the images in the series selected in the filmstrip, the Sync Results hyperlink becomes available..

With multiple images selected, Camera Raw will copy Upright’s numerical transformations from the primary image to the other selected images.

5:02 AM Permalink
September 17, 2013

Camera Raw 8.2, Lightroom 5.2 now available!

Improvements made to both Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) in Photoshop include:

• Refinements to the Spot Removal/Healing tool include a new Feather slider to control the softness of the edge when cloning or healing areas of an image. In addition, there have been improvements in the way that the Spot Healing tool determines the auto source location (the area that it clones/heals from), so that it  now works better for images with textured areas. And, if the image has been cropped, the Spot Removal/Healing tool will bias the selection of the auto source location from within the crop rectangle (as opposed to auto-choosing image areas outside the crop).

• To help reduce low-frequency color mottling like you see on the left side of the illustration below, a new Color Smoothness adjustment slider has been added to the Color Noise Reduction options in the Detail Panel. When the amount is increased, the color mottling is removed (as you see on the right side of the illustration below).

43Detailsmoothing

In addition, several improvements were made to Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) as they are already available/not applicable in Lightroom.

• The Histogram is now interactive in ACR. This enables the ability to click and drag on the Histogram to adjust the Blacks, Shadows, Exposure, Highlights, and Whites slider adjustments in the Basic tab.

• ACR now has separate Auto Temperature and Auto Tint controls, which are applied by Shift -double clicking on either the Temperature or Tint adjustment sliders.

• Refinements to the Local Adjustment Brush include the ability to reposition brush adjustments by clicking and dragging on brush adjustment pins. In addition, Command + Option -drag (Mac) | Control + Alt -drag (Win) a Local Adjustment Brush pin will duplicate the pin and Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click(Win) will delete the pin. If you prefer, Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) displays both options – to duplicate or delete a pin.

• Workflow presets are now available for defining and then quickly choosing output settings in ACR. And, after creating your custom presets, you can Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) the workflow link to quickly switch between them. In addition, when changing image size, a new option for Percentage is available in the drop down menu.

43ACRWorkflow

• Save Image options now include Color Space, Image Sizing, Output Sharpening and Presets. This means that you can select the desired images and save them using Save Image presets without having to change your current workflow settings.

Click here for more information, about the Photoshop Photography Program.

5:31 AM Permalink
August 19, 2013

DNG Verification in Lightroom 5

There is a new command in Lightroom 5 that will verify the integrity of any Adobe created DNG files (Library>Validate DNG Files). If it finds any invalid DNG files, they will automatically be placed in a special collection.

This validation is helpful when we want to check to make sure that files haven’t been corrupted after copying then from one drive to another. It can also be helpful if we want to know with certainty if anything has changed in the original source image. If something has changed, then we know that something has gone wrong and it can (hopefully) be solved before more damage is done (like additional files are copied or changed).

It’s important to note that the data that Lightroom is verifying is the “original source image” – which, in a DNG file is never supposed to change. Lightroom is checking this information independently of the other information (that may have changed) in the file.

Here is a little more detail (and please understand that this is a bit of an oversimplification): the DNG file contains many different “kinds” of information. It’s helpful to imagine that the DNG file is really more like a file cabinet and each different “kind” of information is stored in a different folder in that cabinet. This enables certain segments of the file (one folder) to be altered independently of another segment (or folder).

For example, if you add IPTC data to a DNG file (by adding keywords, copyright etc.), the data in the IPTC folder changes, but the source image data (which is stored in another folder), remains unchanged. Even when you make edits to a DNG file in Lightroom’s Develop module (or Photoshop’s Camera Raw plug-in), all of the changes are made to the DNG file (as a set of instructions) and are stored in a separate folder so as not to change the original source image data. It’s then up to the software – PS or LR to take the original source data and then apply the set of instructions (from the other folder) and display the results on screen so that it “appears” as if the changes have been made when, in fact, the original source information has not been touched. Of course the benefit of not touching the original is that the entire workflow is then non-destructive: the changes can be modified or removed at any time without changing the original source data.

Here we can see that there are many types of data in a DNG file that can be changed. But the Source Image data should remain untouched.

Here we can see that there are many types of data in a DNG file that can be changed including EXIF, IPTC, AUX, RDF etc.). However, the Source Image Data should remain unchanged – and that is what the DNG verification feature validates.

So, it’s the best of both worlds, you can now validate an Adobe DNG file to confirm that the source image data has not changed, yet still make changes to other information in the file in order to add metadata and enhance the image.

Note: Only DNG files created by Adobe software can be validated (camera-‐created DNGs cannot be validated because they do not contain the necessary checksum).

For more information, be sure to check out Peter Krogh’s in depth explanation.

5:43 AM Permalink
July 24, 2013

Soft Proofing Now Available in Adobe Camera Raw 8.1 for Photoshop CC

Camera Raw 8.1 now includes the ability to select RGB, CMYK and LAB ICC profiles to soft proof images. To select a profile, click the workflow Options (accessed via the blue hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw window) and in the Color Space section, choose the Space from the pop-down menu. Once a profile is selected, Camera Raw displays a “soft proof” of that image.  In addition you have the ability to choose either Perceptual or Relative as your rendering Intent and can choose whether or not to Simulate Paper and Ink.

Note: For accurate results, monitor calibration is a must! In addition, there may very well be some colors that simply aren’t reproducible on a monitor that can be printed and vice versa.

5:12 AM Permalink
July 22, 2013

Cropping Images in Adobe Camera Raw 8.1 with Photoshop CC

The Crop tool’s behavior has been modified within Camera Raw 8.1. The Crop tool is now solely responsible for defining the aspect ratio of the crop and the Workflow Options are now responsible for determining the image size. For example, in order to create an image that is 8 x 10 inches at 300 ppi, click and hold the Crop tool to select 4 to 5 from the list of aspect ratios and drag the crop in the image as desired. Then, using the Workflow Options (accessed via the blue hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw window), check the Resize to Fit option. Select Short Size from the drop down menu and enter 8 inches and a resolution 300 ppi.

32ACRworkflowCC

5:02 AM Permalink
June 26, 2013

Merge to HDR Pro in Photoshop CC

There is a new feature when working in the Merge to HDR Pro feature in Photoshop CC. If you set the Mode to 32 bit, under the histogram is an option to “Complete Toning in Adobe Camera Raw”.

22.HDRPro1

Enabling this option, changes the “OK” button to “Tone in ACR”. Clicking “Tone in ACR” tells Photoshop to convert the 32 bit HDR layer into a Smart Object and automatically apply Camera Raw as a Smart Filter.

22.HDRPro3

 

Then, simply apply your desired settings in the Camera Raw Filter and click OK. Because you are working with a smart object, not only can you double click the layer thumbnail to re-edit the Camera Raw options, but you can also use the Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the effect AND change the Blend Mode and Opacity of the filter!

22.HDRPro2

Note: only the following Blend Modes are available when using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter: Normal, Dissolve, Darken, Multiply, Darker Color, Lighten, Linear Dodge (add), Lighter Color, Difference, Subtract, Divide, Hue, Saturation Color and Luminosity.

5:38 AM Permalink