Posts tagged "Brush Tool"

January 30, 2018

Radial Symmetry in Photoshop CC

Did you know that you can unlock additional features of Photoshop’s Paint Symmetry technology preview to quickly create illustrations with variable radial symmetry (and mirrored radial symmetry) simply by renaming any Symmetry Path in the Path panel? Here’s how:

  1. Choose Preferences > Technology and check Enable Paint Symmetry.

  1. Select the Paint Brush, Pencil, or Eraser tool. Note: Paint Symmetry doesn’t support Live Brush Tips (airbrush, bristle tips, erodible).
  2. Click the butterfly icon in the Options bar and select any type of symmetry from the menu. I find that selecting New Dual Axis enables me to use the horizontal and vertical lines as guides however it doesn’t really matter which option you choose because the next step actually determines the type of symmetry (radial or mandala (mirrored)) as well as the number of axis.

  1. Tap Enter (Mac) | Return (win) to accept the default Path Symmetry transformation.
  2. In the Paths panel, rename the path one of the following:

Radial Symmetry x (where x is the number of segments desired with 12 segments being the maximum).

Mandala Symmetry x (where x is the number of segments desired with 10 segments being the maximum).

The examples below show Radial Symmetry set to 10 (resulting in a single paint stroke being repeated 10 times around a 360° axis).

The examples below show Mandala Symmetry set to 10 (resulting in a single paint stroke first being mirrored, then repeated 10 times around a 360° axis).

For a closer look at the difference between  the Radial and Mandala Symmetry options, the illustration below shows the results of a single brush stroke with Radial Symmetry set to 8.The next illustration is the result of adding a second brush stroke.

The next illustration shows Mandala Symmetry set to 8 with a single brush stroke. The Mandala symmetry first mirrors the brush stroke, then repeats it around the radial axis.

Next is the result of adding a second brush stroke.

Here are some additional examples of Radial Symmetry (10, 8, and 10). In the first example,  I clicked once with a pressure sensitive brush, then shift-clicked to draw straight lines between the points. In the second drawing, I started in the center, drew a “swoosh” (crossing over the axis creates the center swirl) and ended the stroke in the center. In the third example, I held the shift key to draw straight lines along the horizontal and vertical axis.

Here are some additional examples of Mandala Symmetry (set to 6, 10, and 8).

Of course this is just the tip of the iceberg – you can always change colors, brush attributes, reposition or rotate the symmetry path, use blend modes to combine multiple drawings, add color overlays – the list goes on and on! Enjoy.

Mike Shaw created this time-lapse video to show you his unique technique for sketching and then creating a mandala. Below are two beautiful examples of Paint Symmetry in Photoshop from Mike. In the first example Mike created custom symmetry path(s), the second uses the paint symmetry feature set to mandala mentioned above.



5:25 AM Permalink
June 3, 2014

Adobe Announces Camera Raw 8.5

Adobe Camera Raw 8.5, has a fantastic new addition to the Graduated and Radial Filters – a brush to selectively hide the effects! This first illustration is the original image.

2014_05_22Original Image

In the image below, a Graduated filter was added to darken the sky, however the effect is also applied to the top of the mountains because they are also affected by the Graduated filter.

2014_05_22GradFilter

To remove the effect in the top of the mountains, with the Gradient Filter selected, choose the Brush option. The Brush options include Size, Feather and Flow as well as Auto Mask (used to automatically detect edges based on contrast and color) and Clear (to remove Brush overrides).

2014_05_Brush

This last image shows the result from using the Graduated Filter Brush to paint out the effect in the mountains while still retaining the effect in the sky area.

2014_05_22GradFilterMask

And one more super shortcut – to keep the Graduated and Radial filters eraser size the same as the brush, click the flyout menu (to the right of the Graduated Filter panel header), and toggle “Separate Eraser Size” from the menu.

As mentioned here, updates to Camera Raw 8 for Photoshop CS6 only include new camera support, lens profile support, and bug fixes.  The new features listed in the release notes are only available in Photoshop CC.

2:45 PM Permalink
September 3, 2010

Painting Straight Lines

To paint a straight line, hold the shift key while dragging a stroke. Or, click once with a painting tool, then release the mouse, hold the shift key and click again to draw a straight line between the two points.

5:32 AM Permalink
May 18, 2010

Panel Icons Displayed in Options Bar

PSCS5 – The painting tools which have panels associated with them, display the associated panel’s icon is next to the Tool Preset Picker in the Option bar (in previous versions the icon was located to the far right). For example, with the Brush tool selected clicking on the Brush Panel icon quickly toggles the Brush on/off. Similarly, with the Healing Brush Tool, clicking the Clone Source icon will toggle the Clone Source Panel on/off.

5:04 AM Permalink
May 12, 2010

Bristle Brush Preview

Update! Click here (20 Brush and Painting Tool Shortcuts in Photoshop CC) to see twenty of my favorite tips related to brushes and painting in Photoshop CC in a single post.


 
When using the New Natural Media Bristle Tips, clicking in the Bristle Brush Preview will toggle between three different views. Shift-clicking in the preview will toggle a color rendering of the brush. (If you are having a difficult time distinguishing between the different views try selecting a Flat Fan tip shape.) If the Bristle Brush Preview is not visible, click the left most icon on the Brush or Brush Presets panel (a natural media tip must be selected in order for the Bristle brush preview icon to be enabled).
5:25 AM Permalink
January 22, 2010

Deleting Brushes, Swatches etc.

Update! Click here (Tips for Working with Color in Photoshop CC) to see all tips for working with color in Photoshop CC in a single post.


 
Option (Mac) / Alt (Win) -click on any brush or swatch in a Panel that you want to delete. (The icon swaps to a pair of scissors) . Of couse you can also delete items using the Preset Manager.
6:54 AM Permalink
January 21, 2010

The Preset Manager

To reorder the brushes in the Brushes panel, select Edit > Presets Manager. Select Brushes for Preset Type, then drag and drop the brush icons into the correct order. Note: this shortcut also works with any of the preset lists in the Preset Manager

5:52 AM Permalink
December 1, 2009

Brush Presets Include Color

When saving a tool preset for a brush (using the fly out menu from the Tool Presets panel or from the Tool Presets Picker), check “Include Color” to save the foreground color.

6:02 AM Permalink
May 7, 2009

Moving from Brush to Brush

Update! Click here (20 Brush and Painting Tool Shortcuts in Photoshop CC) to see twenty of my favorite tips related to brushes and painting in Photoshop CC in a single post.


 
‘<’ or ‘>’ moves to the “previous” or “next” brush in the list on the Brushes Panel. ‘<’ or ‘>’ + Shift goes to the first or last brush in list. (At first glance these shortcuts may appear to be making the brush larger and smaller, but that would be because you’re moving from a smaller to larger brush (or vice-versa) in the Brushes panel).
4:30 AM Permalink
May 5, 2009

Brushes – Anytime, Anywhere!

Update! Click here (20 Brush and Painting Tool Shortcuts in Photoshop CC) to see twenty of my favorite tips related to brushes and painting in Photoshop CC in a single post.


 
To access the Brushes preset picker while anywhere in the image area, control (Mac)/ right mouse (Win) -click with a painting tool selected.
4:49 AM Permalink