Posts tagged "Brushes and Painting"

June 18, 2014

Adobe Announces Largest Software Release Since CS6

Today Adobe announced all new versions of 14 CC desktop applications, 4 new mobile apps, the immediate availability of creative hardware, and new offerings for Enterprise, education and photography customers.

Of course this includes new features, enhancements and updates to both Photoshop and Lightroom for design and photography including the new Spin and Path Blurs in Blur Gallery, new typographic controls including Font Search and Typekit integration, enhancements to Smart Objects, Smart Guides, and Layer Comps, improved Content-Aware technologies, new selection capabilities using Focus Mask, as well as hidden gems and workflow timesavers.

Check out the latest advancements in Photoshop CC in the videos below:

Photoshop CC (2014): New features and enhancements (3 minute overview)

How to Add Realistic Spinning Motion Blur Effects in Photoshop CC

Adding Motion Blur Effects Along a Path in Photoshop CC

New Typographic Features in Photoshop CC

How to Align and Distribute Layers using Smart Guides in Photoshop CC

How to Use Layer Comps for Multi State Mock-ups in Photoshop CC

New Smart Object Features in Photoshop CC

How to Remove Distracting Elements using the Enhanced Content Aware Tools in Photoshop CC

How to Use Focus Mask to Make Selections based on Focus in Photoshop CC

More Hidden Gems in Photoshop CC

In addition, Adobe Camera Raw 8.5 the Radial and Graduated Filters have a new Brush option designed to selectively hide the filter in unwanted areas. This example demonstrates how useful it can be. 

Plus, Camera Raw 8.5 has new Per-Panel Preview toggle button.

And of course the Camera Raw team included additional bug fixes, new camera and lens profile support.

Click here for more information about Adobe’s Announcement 
Click here for more the Creative Cloud FAQ
Click here for more information about Lightroom mobile for iPhone

If you have any questions or comments please feel free to share them on the Photoshop forums!

8:45 AM Permalink
June 11, 2014

What is the Difference Between Opacity and Flow in Photoshop?

In Photoshop, the Opacity setting controls the opacity of the paint - are you painting with an opaque metallic paint or a transparent varnish. The Flow setting controls the speed at which paint is laid down - are you pressing the nozzle of the can of spray paint just a little or all the way down?

5:23 AM Permalink
October 22, 2012

Changing the Brush Size in Liquify

Control + Option-drag (Mac), Right click + Alt-drag (Win) resizes your brush in Liquify. Depending on the size of the change needed, this shortcut might be much faster than using the left and right brackets

5:17 AM Permalink
October 2, 2012

On Screen Color Picker in Photoshop CS6

In Photoshop CS5, Adobe introduced the HUD Color Picker to make the selection of a color even easier. (To access the HUD Color Picker with a painting tool selected, Control + Option + Command (Mac) -click anywhere in the image area and drag to select a color. On Windows, Shift + Alt + right-click and drag to select a color.) In Photoshop CS6, the HUD Color Picker (both the Hue Strip and Hue Wheel) have an additional choice for size – small medium and large which can be set via Preferences > General.

5:53 AM Permalink
September 13, 2012

Recording Tools in Actions in Photoshop CS6

Photoshop CS6 allows for the recording of tools such as the brush tool . This allows you to create artwork while recording an action and then play it back at a later time, perhaps at a higher resolution. To invoke this feature, from the Actions panel flyout, select “Allow Tool Recording”.

Two helpful hints from Mike Shaw:

• When recording be sure to chose your brush as part of the action or Photoshop will use the currently selected brush.

• If you are recording the action to play back at a different size, set the units of measurement in Photoshop to percentage and don’t define the brush size as part of a brush preset.

5:12 AM Permalink
August 31, 2012

Color Dynamics in Photoshop CS6

When using the Brushes in Photoshop CS6, color can now be applied on a per tip stroke basis – to scatter color and size per stroke (not within a single stroke). The three brush strokes on the top were made with the Color Dynamics “Apply Per Tip” option unchecked, the three strokes on the bottom were made with the “Apply Per Tip” option checked.


This feature is especially useful when creating multiple strokes that need to vary slightly in Hue, Saturation and/or Brightness.
5:05 AM Permalink
August 20, 2012

Quick Tip – The Oil Paint Filter in Photoshop CS6

In this Quick Tip, (The Oil Paint Filter in Photoshop CS6), Julieanne demonstrates the new Oil Paint filter in Photoshop CS6 to quickly create a painterly image which can stand it’s own or be used as an under painting for more elaborate artwork.

5:23 AM Permalink
July 19, 2012

Changing the Brush Opacity in Photoshop CS6

As I mentioned in yesterday’s shortcut, you can vary the Brush Size and Hardness with the following shortcuts:

• With a painting tool selected, Control + Option (Mac) – drag left/right in order to decrease/ increase brush size. Control + Option (Mac) – drag up/down to decrease/ increase brush hardness.

• On Windows, Control + Alt +   Right Mouse -drag left right to decrease/ increase brush size and up/down decrease/ increase brush hardness.

If however, you would prefer to change the Brush Opacity (instead of the Brush Hardness), based on the vertical drag movement, select Preferences > General and uncheck “Vary Round Brush Hardness based on HUD vertical movement”. By disabling this preference, Photoshop enables a change in Opacity when dragging up/down.

Of course you can also use the number keys on the keyboard to change the opacity of a painting tool. Tapping one number assigns the percentage of the hit number (1 = 10%, 2= 20% etc. and 0 = 100%). Tapping two numbers quickly will give you that exact amount (5 + 4 = 54%). Tapping 00 (zero-zero) in Photoshop CS6 will decrease the opacity to 0. Note: If you have a tool selected that is not a painting tool, these shortcuts will affect the Opacity on the Layers panel.

5:09 AM Permalink
July 18, 2012

Changing the Brush Size and Hardness in Photoshop CS6

With a painting tool selected, Control + Option (Mac) – drag left/right in order to decrease/ increase brush size. Control + Option (Mac) – drag up/down to decrease/ increase brush hardness.

On Windows,  Alt +  Right Mouse -drag left right to decrease/ increase brush size and up/down decrease/ increase brush hardness.

I prefer these shortcuts – even though they are a bit more complex than tapping the left or right bracket keys, as many international keyboards do not have brackets. Of course you can always customize the keys used to increase/decrease brush size and Hardness under Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts – choose “Shortcuts For : Tools”, scroll down (almost the bottom of the list) and enter any single character to set a new shortcut for Decreasing/Increasing Brush Size.

5:05 AM Permalink
June 1, 2012

Working with Pantone + Color Libraries in Photoshop CS6

The Pantone Color Libraries have been updated in Photoshop CS6 and are now called Pantone +.  In order to work with legacy files, you will still find both the Pantone solid coated and Pantone solid uncoated libraries in Photoshop CS6. If needed, you can load the older books (like Pantone Solid Color Euro) from PSCS5, but you should know that Pantone/X-Rite no longer support the older, legacy color libraries.

7:13 AM Permalink
October 17, 2011

A Dozen of my Favorite Little Known Features in PSCS5

In a recent presentation I was asked to share some “lesser” known features from Photoshop CS5. I have noted all of the following in my blog at some point, but here are a dozen of my favorites all together:

1) Changing Brush Size – With a painting tool selected, Control + Option (Mac) – drag left/right in order to decrease/ increase brush size. To decrease/ increase brush hardness, drag up/down. On Windows, Shift + Alt -drag left right to decrease/ increase brush size and up/down decrease/ increase brush hardness.

2) On Screen Color Picker – To access the new HUD color Picker, with a painting tool selected, Control + Option + Command (Mac) -click and drag to select a color. On Windows, Shift + Alt + right-click and drag to select a color. Or, if that shortcut is too much to remember, to display the color picker using a keyboard shortcut, choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. Under the Shortcuts for “Tools” scroll to the bottom to locate the “Foreground Color Picker ” line item and enter in your own custom keyboard shortcut.

3) The Eyedropper Tool – Clicking in the image area with the Eyedropper tool now displays a sample ring. The “new” color (the one being sampled) is displayed in the upper half of the ring while the current (or foreground color before sampling) is displayed in the bottom half. The ring is surrounded by grey to help neutralize surrounding colors that may influence color choices. The sample ring can be toggled off/on by unchecking/checking Show Sample Ring in the Options bar. Or, if you’re an avid user of Tool presets, make one with the ring turned on, the other with it off. In addition Control (Mac) / Right Mouse (Win) -click to select the Sample Size or Copy the Color as Hex Code or HTML

4) Scrubby Zoom – With the Zoom tool selected, click-drag to the right to zoom in, click-drag to the left to Zoom out. This new feature adds the benefit of being able to quickly zoom in AND zoom out to a specific location, however, if you prefer the legacy behavior (click-drag over the area to zoom into), disable Scrubby Zoom in the Options Bar. In addition, when viewing multiple images simultaneously, Shift -drag with the Hand tool to pan all open documents. Similarly, shift -clicking with the Zoom tool will zoom all images simultaneously. To set this as the default behavior, with the Zoom or Hand tool selected, check the “Zoom all Windows” and/or “Pan all Windows” in the Option bar.

5) Saving 16 Bit Images as JPEG – If you’re working with 16 bit files and want to save them as a JPEG, you can now select the JPEG file format from the list in the Save As dialog box. However, you need to know that saving as a JPEG will convert the file from 16 bit down to 8 bit (as the JPEG file format does not support 16 bit). Note: it is also important to note if you’re saving a layered file as a JPEG, Photoshop will flatten the file as the JPEG file format does not support layers.

6) Saving Files to Their Original Folders  – By default, when saving files, Photoshop will automatically navigate to the folder where the last file was saved. To save files to their original folder, select Preferences > File Handling > and check on the “Save As to Original Folder” option.

7) Auto-Select Parameter for Adjustment Layers  – In order to automatically put the keyboard focus onto the first field in the Adjustment panel, use the fly out menu in the Adjustments panel, and select Auto-Select Parameter (this behavior was added as it is similar to the legacy way of working with image adjustment dialog boxes – as oppose to the adjustment panel). Return (Mac) / Enter (Win) + Shift is another way to put the keyboard focus onto the first field in the Adjustment panel. You can also use a keyboard shortcut to select the Targeted Adjustment Tool while using a Hue/Saturation, Curves, or Black & White adjustment layer, choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. Under the Shortcuts for “Tools” scroll the towards the bottom of the list to locate the “Targeted Adjustment Tool” line item and enter in your own custom keyboard shortcut.

8)The Crop Tool Overlay – With the Crop tool selected, drag out the crop marquee and then, in the Options bar, choose Between Rule of Thirds, Grid or None for the Crop Guide Overlay. Note, you must first drag out the crop in the image area for this setting to appear in the Options bar.

9) Control Change the Opacity/Fill of Multiple Layers  – Simply select multiple layers in the Layers panel and use the Opacity and/or Fill slider to change the Opacity/Fill of all selected layers at once.

10) Layer Styles – In order to customize the default Layer Style settings, select Layer > Layer Style (or click the fx icon at the bottom of the Layers panel). In the Layer Style dialog, make the desired changes, and click the Make Default button. If you make changes to the style and want to reset the changes to your custom default, click the Reset to Default button.

11) Panorama Stitching  – When using the Auto-Align Layers command Photoshop now leverages lens correction profiles (if applied).

12) Non-rotating Brushes with Rotate View – When using the Rotate View tool to rotate the canvas for easier drawing and painting, the brushes will no longer rotate with the canvas rotation; instead they remain at the orientation of the original artwork regardless of the viewing angle.

4:54 AM Permalink
September 15, 2011

Quick Tip – How to Draw a Circle Around an Object in Photoshop

When I create an episode of The Complete Picture for Adobe TV, I try to cram in as much information as I possibly can about a subject yet not run over the 10 minute limit (which I seem to do anyway – so I really owe a great deal to Kush, Karl and Erik for their never ending patience and extremely fast editing skills!).

But, I was trying to find a way to answer the questions/comments/requests that I receive – which I could cover in a less-than-one-minute video – yet would take a slow writer such as myself a millennium to put down on paper. So, last time I visited AdobeTV, we recorded some of these shorter “Quick Tips” tips that I could release in between the longer episodes of The Complete Picture.

Here is the first Quick Tip where I explain How to Draw a Circle Around an Object in Photoshop. Please let me know if you find it useful.

 

 

8:18 AM Permalink
May 25, 2011

Simulating Pressure when Stroking a Path

In order to simulate pressure sensitivity when stroking a path, select the path in the paths panel, choose Stroke Path from the fly out menu and check Simulate Pressure. Note, it is important to set up your brush (or whatever tool you want to use), as well as its attributes BEFORE you stroke the path.

In this illustration, the first path was stroked with a brush with the Simulate Pressure option unchecked. The second and third paths both had the Simulate Pressure option checked; the middle illustration demonstrating the brushes Opacity (under Transfer on the Brush Panel) set to Pen Pressure , the right illustration demonstrating Size (under Shape Dynamics on the Brush Panel) and Opacity set to Pen Pressure.

4:32 AM Permalink
March 29, 2011

Creating Fluid, Precise Painting Strokes

To create a stroke of paint or create a smooth path for dodging and burning, first create a path with the pen too. Then, make sure that the painting tool that you want to use is set up with the correct options (such as brush size and opacity etc.). Finally, from the Paths panel fly-out, menu, select Stroke path and select the desired tool. This can be extremely helpful for example, when trying to follow curves in a object such as an edge on a car to add a highlight to. Note that you can also choose the simulate pressure option to simulate pressure sensitivity of the tool.

 

5:10 AM Permalink
September 3, 2010

Painting Straight Lines

To paint a straight line, hold the shift key while dragging a stroke. Or, click once with a painting tool, then release the mouse, hold the shift key and click again to draw a straight line between the two points.

5:32 AM Permalink