Posts tagged "HDR"

April 23, 2015

Tips for Creating Raw HDR Images in Lightroom CC

Click here to watch  how to create raw HDR images in Lightroom CC. 

Below are additional tips for creating raw HDR imagse in Lightroom CC.

• Not all adjustments that you make to individual images will carry over when selecting Photo > Photo Merge > HDR. For example, if you have made local adjustments on individual exposures using the radial filter or the adjustment brush, those adjustments will not be applied to the merged file. Because of this, I would suggest that you don’t spend a great deal of time making adjustments to each of the individual exposures but, instead, merge the images and then make adjustments to the resulting HDR image. The settings that are NOT copied over from individual exposures to the merged file are:

– The primary tone settings in the Basic panel including: Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, and Blacks (since the merge is expanding tonal range using its own calculations).

– Tone Curve

– Local Corrections

– Red Eye

– Spot Healing

– Upright

– Crop

– Process Version (if set to anything other than the most recent, Lightroom will automatically update it)

• If you make adjustments to an individual exposures that can be copied over to the merged file (such as conversion to B/W or Split Toning adjustments) , make sure that the exposure with the adjustments is the “most selected” image.

• Merging HDR images requires exposure metadata. If aperture and ISO information is available, then it is used as well.

• Lightroom will  show an error if you try to merge photos of different sizes, focal lengths, etc.

• Option + Shift + H (Mac) | Alt + Shift + H (Win) will run Photo Merge > HDR based on the last used Merge settings (without displaying the Merge preview window).

• The merged HDR images is 16-bit due to the significant (and painful) file size that would result if the HDR merge was 32 bit.

• By default Lightroom appends the file name with -HDR. Although you cannot change the default file naming convention, you can always rename files after they are created.

• The resulting (merged) DNG files will always default to Process Version (PV) 2012, despite any differing PV settings applied to the source images. This is because PV2012 is required for the extended Exposure range (+/- 10 stops) of 16 & 32bit files, where as PV2003 & PV2010 are restricted to (+/- 4 stops).

5:12 AM Permalink

Tips for Creating Raw HDR Images in Camera Raw 9.0

Click here to watch how to create raw HDR images in Camera Raw 9.0

Below are additional tips for creating raw HDR images in Camera Raw 9.0. Not all adjustments that you make to individual images will carry over when selecting  Photo Merge > HDR in Camera Raw. For example, if you have made local adjustments on individual exposures using the radial filter or the adjustment brush, those adjustments will not be applied to the merged file. Because of this, I would suggest that you don’t spend a great deal of time making adjustments to each of the individual exposures but, instead, merge the images and then make adjustments to the resulting, merged, HDR image. The settings that are NOT copied over from individual exposures to the merged file are:

– The primary tone settings in the Basic panel including Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, and Blacks (since the merge is expanding tonal range using its own calculations).

– Tone Curve

– Local Corrections

– Red Eye

– Spot Healing

– Upright

– Crop

– Process Version (if set to anything other than the most recent – 2012)

• If you make adjustments to an individual exposures that can be copied over to the merged file (such as conversion to B/W or Split Toning adjustments) , make sure that the exposure with the adjustments is the “most selected” image.

• HDR merging requires exposure metadata. If aperture and ISO information is available, then it is used as well.

• Camera Raw will  show an error if you try to merge photos of different sizes, focal lengths, etc.

• The merged HDR images is 16 bit due to the significant (and painful) file size that would result if the HDR merge was 32-bit.

• By default Camera Raw appends the file name with -HDR. You can change this in the Camera Raw Preferences.

• The resulting (merged) DNG files will always default to Process Version (PV) 2012, despite any differing PV settings applied to the source images. This is because PV2012 is required for the extended Exposure range (+/- 10 stops) of 16 & 32bit files, where as PV2003 & PV2010 are restricted to (+/- 4 stops).

– Tap the “A” key to toggle the Align Images feature

– Tap the “T” key to toggle Auto Tone

– Tap the “Y” key  to show the Deghost Shadow Overlay

5:12 AM Permalink
April 21, 2015

Adobe Announces Camera Raw 9.0 – Raw Merging of Panoramas and HDR Images!

Discover how easy it is to create high dynamic range images as well as stitch panoramas together using the new PhotoMerge technology within Adobe Camera Raw. Prior to this release, merging multiple exposures of the same scene into a single file had to be done in Photoshop as a pixel based document. But now, Adobe Camera Raw is able to merge the raw image data from multiple source files so that the resulting image contains all of the desired shadow, midtone, and highlight information WITH all of the editing flexibility that comes with raw! For more information, be sure to watch the videos below:
Stitching Raw Panoramas within Adobe Camera Raw 9.0

Raw High Dynamic Range Imaging within Adobe Camera Raw 9.0

10:00 AM Permalink

Adobe Announces Lightroom CC!

04-21-BodieHDRPanoWatch and learn as Julieanne walks through all of the new features and enhancements to Lightroom CC including Face Detection and Recognition, Photo Merge (including raw panoramic stitching and raw high dynamic range image creation), improved slideshow capabilities, faster performance, improved local adjustment tools, HTML 5 compatible web galleries, and more!

Face Detection and Recognition in Lightroom CC 
Discover how to automatically tag images with faces using Lightroom’s new Face Detection and Recognition feature.

Raw High Dynamic Range Imaging within Lightroom CC 
Discover how to combine multiple bracketed exposures into a single high dynamic range (HDR) image that has all of the editing flexibility of a Raw file.

Stitching Raw Panoramas within Lightroom CC 
Discover how to stitch together multiple files into a panorama that has all of the editing flexibility of a Raw file.

Improved Slideshow Creation in Lightroom CC 
Create dynamic slideshows in  Lightroom including automated pan and zooms, additional audio tracks and automatic music syncing.

Hidden Gems in Lightroom CC
Discover new features and enhancements Lightroom CC including faster performance, improved local adjustment tools, HTML 5 compatible web galleries and more!

Click here to see a list of new camera and lens support in Lightroom CC.

9:05 AM Permalink
August 1, 2014

15/50 – Using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC to Create a High Dynamic Range ( HDR) Image

In the video below, we’re going to discover how easy it is to take multiple, bracketed exposures of the same scene and combine them into a single 32-bit HDR image that can then be edited nondestructively using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC. In addition, we’ll discover how powerful Camera Raw can be when applied to multiple layers as a Smart Object.

And just in case I wasn’t clear in the video, I want to point out why Adobe would include Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop CC. Well, here are the first three reasons that I can think of, but I’m sure that there are more!
• First of all, not everyone had the luxury of working with raw files so it can be a huge benefit to be able to apply options like clarity and perspective correction to non raw images (a Photoshop layer for example).
• Sometimes we forget to do things in the right order and we don’t have time to go back to the beginning and fix them when on deadline. Yes, this might not be optimal, and yes, we would be better off making changes earlier in our workflow (processing our raw files directly in Camera Raw before opening them in Photoshop), but Camera Raw as a filter can help to make corrections or add creative effects to layers later in your workflow and/or with legacy files.
• Camera Raw as a filter can be applied to multiple layers at one time (by selecting multiple layers in the Layers panel and converting them to a single Smart Object). Plus, working with Camera Raw as a Smart Filter enables blend mode and opacity options as well as a Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the filter.
Additional information can be found in this post.
Note: The following features are not available when using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter (that are normally available in Camera Raw), primarily because they don’t make sense in the filter context: Workflow options and preferences, crop and straighten tools, rotation tools (rotate left/right buttons), snapshots, camera and lens profile corrections.

5:06 AM Permalink
November 20, 2013

Video Tutorial – Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC), Julieanne demonstrates how to take multiple exposures and combine them into a single 32-bit HDR file that can then be edited nondestructively using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop. In addition, you’ll discover how powerful using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter can be when working with layered files.

8:05 AM Permalink
August 6, 2013

Video Tutorial – Moving Between Lightroom and Photoshop

In this video tutorial (Moving Between Lightroom and Photoshop), you’ll learn how to seamlessly move images between Lightroom and Photoshop with the exact control that you need. Discover how easy it is to create panoramas, merge 16 bit high-dynamic range (HDR) images and open multiple photographs into a single file in Photoshop.

5:05 AM Permalink
June 18, 2012

Video Tutorial – 32-bit HDR TIFF files in LR 4.1

In this Quick Tip, (Creating 32-bit HDR images in Lightroom 4.1), Julieanne demonstrates how to create a 32-bit file from multiple exposures in Photoshop and then take that file back into Lightroom 4.1 in order to use the Develop module to refine color and tonality — all while still working in 32 bit!

In the tutorial, I don’t believe that I mentioned that when I choose Edit > In, my default setting is to hand off a TIFF file to Photoshop. That way, when I save the file, it saves a 32-bit TIFF – which is what Lightroom prefers (not a PSD file).

 

8:10 AM Permalink
June 7, 2010

Video Tutorial – Moving Between Lightroom 3 and Photoshop CS5

In this Video tutorial (Moving Between Lightroom 3 and Photoshop CS5), Julieanne demonstrates
how to take a single image or multiple images for editing seamlessly between Lightroom and Photoshop. Also, see how to use Photoshop tools like Photomerge, HDR pro, and the export dialog in Lightroom for exporting multiple files.

Note: This tutorial is part of the Lightroom 3 Getting Started Series.

1:47 PM Permalink
May 19, 2010

Video Tutorial – HDR and Tone Mapping Photoshop CS5

In this episode of The Complete Picture (HDR and Tone Mapping Photoshop CS5), Julieanne Kost covers the new Merge to HDR Pro and Tone Mapping Adjustment features in Adobe Photoshop CS5 which allow you to get a much higher dynamic range in your images.

3:51 PM Permalink
October 30, 2009

Video Tutorial – Photomerge, Auto Align and Content Aware Scale

In this video tutorial (Photomerge, Auto Align and Content Aware Scale), Julieanne Kost shows you how Photoshop CS4 will help you with it’s content aware fill, intelligent scaling, alignment and auto-blending.

3:12 PM Permalink