Posts tagged "Interface"

May 12, 2015

Create and Save Your Own Tool Presets in Photoshop

In this episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne Demonstrates how to eliminate repetitive tasks and increase efficiencies in Photoshop by customizing the tools you use the most and saving them as Presets.

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May 8, 2015

Quick Tip – Customizing View Options in Lightroom

In this quick tip, you’ll discover how to customize Lightroom’s view options to display the information you need Grid and Loupe view.

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April 28, 2015

Lightroom CC – Overview of the Lightroom Interface

Take a brief tour through the Lightroom interface to familiarize yourself with Lightroom’s tools and modular workflow.

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March 13, 2015

Custom Panels and Workspaces in Photoshop

I find it to be well worth my time to configure the panels that I am going to be using for a project or specific type of task and then save them as a custom workspace. For example, when I am compositing multiple images together, I use very different sets of panels than I might when working on a document that is text heavy.
Below is a screenshot showing how I arrange my panels for compositing. I dock the panels that I use most often to the Tools (on the left side of the screen). This saves significant time over the course of the day by eliminating the need to travel back and forth across my monitor to select different panel options, tools, and tool options. I have also placed the Properties panel below the Layers panel so that when I add an adjustment layer, my cursor is automatically above the options for that layer.

03_08PanelsThis video (although recorded a while back) demonstrates how to streamline Phostoshop for your specific needs through the customization of Workspaces, Menus, Keyboard shortcuts, Preferences, Tool Presets, Palette options, and the Preset Manager.

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March 12, 2015

Auto-Collapse Iconic Panels in Photoshop

To free up screen real estate, Photoshop offers several options for displaying panels. When viewing the panels as icons, clicking the icon expands the panel to reveal the options. Then, by default, the panel will automatically collapse back into the icon when you click anywhere outside of the panel. If you prefer the panels to remain open, select Preferences > Interface and uncheck the Auto-Collapse Iconic Panels option (or right click on the panel tab and select this option).

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March 11, 2015

Auto-Show Hidden Panels in Photoshop

Tapping the Tab key in Photoshop will hide the tools as well as panels. Tapping again displays them. While they are hidden, positioning the cursor at the edge of the monitor will display the panels so that you can access the tools/options that you need and,  when you move your cursor away, Photoshop will automatically hide them (similar to a roll-over effect). To toggle off this feature, choose Preferences > Interface > Auto-Show Hidden Panels.

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February 11, 2015

Using Lightroom with Two Monitors

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost shows you how to use 2 monitors to take advantage of Lightroom’s dual monitor solution. Even though I recorded this video a while back, I have been receiving a lot of questions about it lately so I thought I would repost it.

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February 5, 2015

Layer Panel Preview Options in Photoshop

You can customize the preview settings for your Layer thumbnails by selecting Panel Options from the Layers panel fly-out. These settings can make it far easier to see the contents of a layer – especially when viewing on screens that have limited screen area.

• Select a desired Thumbnail Size. Note: if your image is significantly wider than it is high, selecting the smaller thumbnail sizes might display the generic icon for Adjustment layers.

• Under Change Thumbnail Contents, select  “Layer Bounds” to display a preview image of only the area in the layer that contains content.

With the Thumbnail content set to Layer Bounds, we see the  shells as large as possible in the thumbnail.

With the Thumbnail content set to Layer Bounds, we see the shells as large as possible within the thumbnail area.

Select “Entire Document” to display the layer content in relationship to the entire document.

With the Thumbnail content set to Entire Document, we see the location of the shells in relationship to the entire canvas size.

With the Thumbnail Content set to Entire Document, we see the location of the shells in relationship to the entire canvas.

• Use Default Masks on Fill Layers will automatically add layer masks to Fill layers.

• Expand New Effects  displays the contents of layer styles when applied.

• Add “copy” to Copied Layers and Groups will add the word copy to the layer name when duplicating layers in the Layers panel.

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December 12, 2014

Using Multiple Windows in Photoshop CC

When doing detail work on an image (where, for example, you might need to be zoomed in to a very small portion of the overall image), it can be helpful to open a secondary window in order to see the changes that you are making in relationship to the entire photograph or design. To do so, simply select Window > Arrange > New Window For (XXX).
2014_12Secondary

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December 9, 2014

Shortcut to Reset Dialog Boxes in Photoshop

In almost all of the dialog boxes in Photoshop, holding the Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) key toggles the Cancel option to Reset.

And, more often than not, while in those same dialog boxes, Command + “+” (plus)  (Mac) | Control  (Win) +” (plus) zooms in and Command +  “-” (minus) (Mac) | Control  (Win) + “-” (minus) will zoom out.

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November 24, 2014

Customizing the Default Settings in Lighroom’s Develop Module

When using the Post-Crop Vignette panel in the Develop Module in Lightroom, if you prefer Color Priority or Paint Overlay (instead of Highlight Priority) to be the default style, you can change it by customizing the Develop module’s Default Settings.

This video, Working with Camera Profiles, explains how to customize and save new default settings in the Develop module. Because the video was recorded when Adobe announced Camera Matching profiles (in LR2!), the first six minutes of the video discusses these profiles. However, it then it goes on to explain how to set your default settings in either Lightroom or Camera Raw and even though a lot has changed since then, you can still use the same method today for changing default settings for panels other than Camera Calibration – including Post Crop Vignettes and Lens Correction.

 

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November 13, 2014

Rotate View and Spring Loaded Cursors in Photoshop

The Rotate View tool is extremely helpful when painting, drawing, or doing anything in Photoshop that benefits from rotating a document on the screen (allowing more natural hand positioning and movement) without actually rotating the contents of the document.

The Rotate View tool works very well in tandem with “Spring Loaded” cursors. Instead of tapping ”R” to select the Rotate View tool, hold the “R” key to temporarily access the tool. Then, when you release the key, you will automatically be returned to the selected tool. For example, if you are drawing a path with the Pen tool but need to change the rotation of the view – press and hold the “R” key, drag to rotate the view, and when you release the “R” key – you are back with the Pen tool, ready to continue drawing!

Double click the Rotate View tool  to reset the view or, with the Rotate View tool selected, tap the Escape key to reset the view.  Using the Options bar, you can also choose to rotate only the active document or all open images (Rotate All Windows).

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October 23, 2014

Overscrolling Documents in Photoshop CC 2014

The ability to “Overscroll” is extremely useful new feature in Photoshop CC 2014 – especially when free transforming images. Overscrolling enables an image that is smaller than the application frame to be repositioned within the application frame. In the example below, I’ve dragged and dropped a very large image onto a smaller document. Because the first document is so large, selecting Edit > Free Transform (to resize the large document down), draws the transformation handles far beyond the application frame. By enabling Overscroll (Preferences > Interface > Overscroll), and holding down the spacebar (to temporarily access the hand tool), I can reposition the document within the  window. In past versions of Photoshop, the document was anchored to the center of the image, limiting access to the transformation handles without first zooming out.

2014_10Overscroll

 

I also find Overscrolling useful when I need to reposition small documents within the application frame to create screenshots and illustrations. Of course you can always switch views (changing to Full Screen or Floating view) if desired, but I find this method easier.

Note: Another way to quickly see the transformation handles is to use the shortcut Command + 0 (zero) (Mac) | Control + 0 (Win). This zooms out to fit the  transformation handles on screen (just as Command + 0 (zero) (Mac) | Control + 0 (Win) will “fit” the image on screen when not in Free Transform).

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July 22, 2014

7/50 Disabling Photoshop’s Properties Panel from Auto Showing on Shape Creation

In Photoshop CC, adding a Rectangle, Rounded Rectangle, or Ellipse shape layer (using the Shape tools) automatically displays the Properties panel making it easier to access the “Live Shape” Properties. But sometimes I find that having the Properties panel automatically popping out from its iconic view can be distracting. To stop this “auto-reveal” behavior, from the Properties panel’s fly-out menu, uncheck “Show on Shape Creation”. Note: you must have a Shape layer with Live Shape Properties to access this fly-out menu.
45PropPanel1

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July 8, 2014

Fit the Image “On Screen” in Photoshop

Double-clicking the Hand tool in the Tool Panel is the same as selecting View > Fit on Screen (Photoshop will display the entire image as large as possible on screen. Note: Command + 0 (Mac) | Control + 0 (Win) also displays the image as large as possible.

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