Posts tagged "Masking"

July 11, 2014

Inverting a Quick Mask in Photoshop

Option -click  (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on the Quick Mask icon to invert the selection when entering Quick Mask mode.

5:48 AM Permalink
June 20, 2014

Video Tutorial – Masking Images to Shapes & Type

There are a number of different techniques for displaying a photograph within type or other graphics. In this quick tip, you’ll learn how to apply a clipping mask to a layer group enabling you to mask multiple layers at once while keeping the type, the graphics and the photograph re-editable.

10:30 AM Permalink
June 5, 2014

Refining the Edge of a Mask in Photoshop

If a section of a mask isn’t quite correct, try using the Dodge or Burn tool in the mask to subtly adjust the edge (by lightening or darkening the grayscale values within the transitional area). In this example, the original mask is too soft and as a result, we can see  a green halo around the edge of the leaf.

The original mask shows a green fringe around the edge of the leaf.

Looking at the original mask, we can see that the edge of the mask needs to be reduced in width as well as shifted towards the edge of the leaf. Note: This is also known as “choking” the mask. Moving in the other direction would be “spreading” the mask.

The original mask's transitional area needs to be reduced and shifted into (choked) the leaf.

Using the Burn tool on the mask’s edge, darkens the values in the transitional areas of the mask, narrowing the transitional area and moving the mask in towards the leaf. (I realize that the change is subtle in this illustration, but notice how the edge of the mask in the illustration below appears sharper than in the illustration above.)

Using the burn tool on the transitional edge of the mask (in the grayscale areas), darkened the

As a result of choking the mask, the green halo is removed from around the edge of the leaf.

adfg

 

5:11 AM Permalink
May 16, 2014

Masking Video for Special Effects - Photoshop Playbook

Lex and Bryan asked me to do a guest appearance on the Photoshop Playbook series, so here’s How to Mask Video to Create Special Effects.


Now let’s go make something fun!  : )

10:00 AM Permalink
February 18, 2014

“The Art of Photoshop Compositing” Now Live on lynda.com!

I’m really excited to announce that my new class: The Art of Photoshop Compositing is now live  on www.lynda.com! 

2014_02_17_JKost_CompLR

“Join Julieanne Kost as she walks you through her creative thought process and explains how she transforms concepts and raw images into entirely new works of art using Adobe Photoshop. Discover how to select the images you need to create a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts. Master the tools used in compositing, including adjustment layers, masking, blending, and Smart Objects, so that the technology doesn’t get in the way of expressing your creative vision. Learn how to adjust scale and perspective and manipulate texture and focus to help viewers temporarily suspend their disbelief long enough to enter your world.”

Topics include:

  • What makes a good composite?
  • Refining your story
  • Composing using the basic principles of design
  • Customizing your Photoshop workspace
  • Preparing elements from your source images
  • Adjusting color, tone, balance, and perspective
  • Mastering the Pen tool
  • Unifying with texture, focus, leading lines, and structure

I look forward to hearing your feedback!

5:00 AM Permalink
January 8, 2014

The Adjustment Brush Overlay in Lightroom

When painting with the Adjustment Brush in the Develop Module in Lightroom, tap the “O” key to Show/Hide Mask Overlay. Add the Shift key to cycle the mask overlay colors (red, green and white). Displaying the mask overlay can make it much easier to see areas the areas that are included/excluded from the adjustment in order to make refinements to the mask. 

5:02 AM Permalink
February 27, 2013

Video Tutorial – 5 Reasons to Use Layer Groups in Photoshop

Layer Groups – they’re not just for organizing your layers! In this episode of The Complete Picture (5 Reasons to use Layer Groups in Photoshop), Julieanne demonstrates 5 ways to use Layer Groups to create special effects in Photoshop.

5:16 AM Permalink
February 26, 2013

Moving and Copying Vector Layer Masks in Photoshop

• Drag a vector mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to move it from one layer to another.

• Option -drag (Mac) | Alt  -drag (Win) the vector mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to make a copy of the vector mask.

• Command + Shift -drag (Mac) | Control  + Shift -drag (Win) the vector mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to make an “inverted” copy of the vector mask.

5:14 AM Permalink
February 22, 2013

“Blend If” Sliders in Photoshop

One of the ways that Photoshop can help blend multiple images together is through using the “Blend If” sliders in the Blending Options of the Layer Styles dialog. In this example I want to blend the clouds from the first image into the sky of the rock image.

08_JKost_Clouds

08_JKost_Rocks

 

With the Cloud image selected on the Layers panel, I choose layer > Layer Style > Blending Options (or, you can use the fx icon at the bottom of the Layers panel and choose Blending Options…).

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In the Layer Styles dialog, I moved the black slider for the Underlying Layer to the right to hide the dark foreground values of the cloud image. In order to create a smooth transition, Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) click and drag the black triangle to split it into two. The values to the left of the split triangle will be completely transparent the values between the split triangle will transition from transparent to opaque, and the values to the right of the second split triangle will be fully opaque.

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It’s OK if the rock in the foreground is semi transparent at this point – you want to focus on the “transitional areas” – where the new sky (the clouds) will meet the  ocean and the top of the rocks.

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To bring back the solid rocks in the foreground, I made a copy of the rock layer and moved it above the new sky (the clouds) layer in the Layers panel. Then, I added a layer mask and painted with black to hide the drab sky and reveal the clouds below, while keeping the rocks solid.

08_JKost_BlendIfCombo

Because this example has a fairly straightforward horizon to mask, you might feel that I’m making this process or technique overly complicated. However, the Blend if sliders can be tremendously useful when masking detailed objects such as a tree against a sky. Notice that you can even change the Blend If options to blend individual color channels.

5:09 AM Permalink
November 14, 2012

Quick Tip – Creating Masks to Move Over Time in Photoshop CS6

In this Quick Tip (Creating Masks to Move Over Time in Photoshop CS6), Julieanne reveals a technique to create a mask using the reflected gradient which can quickly be repositioned over time without retouching.

 

5:47 AM Permalink
November 7, 2012

Video Tutorial – Masking Video for Special Effects in Photoshop CS6

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Masking Video for Special Effects in Photoshop CS6), Julieanne demonstrates how to mask a video clip in Photoshop CS6 to reveal motion in a selective region of the clip over time.

5:05 AM Permalink
September 6, 2012

Top 10 Favorite Photoshop Shortcuts when Working with Layers.

Click here to download my top 10 favorite Photoshop shortcuts when working with layers - LayersShortcuts.pdf.

(I compiled them for my Creative Compositing class at Photoshop World today – see you there!)

 

5:30 AM Permalink
July 20, 2012

Feathering an Edge Using the Properties Panel in Photoshop CS6

When working with Layer Masks, the Properties panel can be used to non-destructively soften the edge of the mask enabling it to  be re-edited at a later time. This can be very useful if the size of the original file or even layer needs to be changed in the editing process.

To add a non-destructive feather, select the desired layer mask on the Layers panel. Then, on the Properties panel, adjust the Feather slider as needed. Although this feature was in Photoshop CS5 (via the Masks panel), in Photoshop CS6 the Feather  values support decimal places.

Note: in Photoshop CS6, the Marquee, and Lasso tool’s feather values (in the Options bar), support decimal places as well.

5:13 AM Permalink
June 22, 2012

Photoshop’s Mask Panel – Nondestructive Edge Softening

When adding a mask to a layer in Photoshop, instead of guessing at the size of a feather that should be applied (because we know that the feather amount will vary depending on the resolution of the image and the desired softness of the edge that is being feathered), use the non-destructive Feather option  on the Properties panel. To access the mask properties, click on the mask icon on the Properties Panel. Now, you can add a feather to soften an edge yet, if the image is resized or other adjustments need to be made at a later time, the feather can be appropriately adjusted.

And while you’re in the Properties panel, and the focus is on the mask, be sure to check out the non-destructive Density slider to reduce the opacity (density) of the mask.

5:14 AM Permalink
September 13, 2010

Double Check your Layer Mask

When working on intricately composited, multi layered documents, I often find it useful to check each of the layer masks before finalizing the image. To do this, Option (Mac) / Alt (Win) -click on the mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to display it. With the mask visible, check to see if there are any unwanted awkward transitional areas that might not have been visible in the complex composite (a sharp edge from a selection or gradient for example).

6:51 AM Permalink