Posts tagged "Masking"

June 25, 2015

Cyclical – The Creative Process

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne reveals her Lightroom to Photoshop workflow used to create the still life “Cyclical”.
   

5:14 AM Permalink
June 12, 2015

The Creative Composite – Hindsight

In this Episode of the Complete Picture I demonstrate some basic compositing techniques in Photoshop, used to illustrate the feeling and mood of Iceland. In this tutorial, you’ll discover how easy it is to combine multiple images together using Layers, masking, blend modes, and transparency in Photoshop.

5:11 AM Permalink
May 8, 2015

Creating Masks to Move Over Time in Photoshop

In this Quick Tip, Julieanne reveals a technique to create a mask using the reflected gradient which can quickly be repositioned over time without retouching.

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March 19, 2015

Masking Videos for Special Effects in Photoshop

Learn how easy it is to mask a video clip in Photoshop – to selectively reveal motion over time.

4:58 AM Permalink
January 28, 2015

Insights into “How My Brain Composites Images Together”

Because so many people ask me how I come up with the ideas for my digital illustrations, I put together a short slideshow to demonstrate how I layer different elements together.

The video below provides a more detailed Photoshop tutorial demonstrating how “Isostacy” was created.

The video below provides a more detailed Photoshop tutorial demonstrating how “Twilight” was created.

For more complete training on how I use Photoshop to create these composites, you can watch either of my two training series on Lynda.com:
Introduction to Compositing
The Art of Photoshop Compositing

5:33 AM Permalink
December 10, 2014

Using the Gradient Tool in a Layer Mask in Photoshop

When drawing with the default gradient in a mask, if the mask isn’t quite right, it’s easy to draw another gradient to replace the first one.

Dragging the Default gradient from white to black, hides the adjustment in the lower portion of the image.

Dragging the default gradient from white to black hides the adjustment in the lower portion of the image.

However dragging a second gradient replaces the first one.

By default, dragging a second gradient replaces the first one.

If, however, you want to draw a secondary gradient that will add to or subtract from the mask (instead of replacing it), change the blend mode for the Gradient tool to Multiply (to add black) or Screen (to add white) and then drag the second gradient.

Setting the Gradient to screen will add the lighter portion of the gradient while hiding black.

Setting the Gradient tool’s blend mode to screen (before dragging the second gradient) will add the lighter values to the mask. If you are hiding an area and want the darker values of the Gradient to show, then change the Gradient Tool’s blend mode to Multiply.

Note: in the example above, I selected Edit > Undo to undo the gradient that drew in the second illustration before changing the blend mode to Screen and redrawing the gradient.

Of course there are other ways to draw masks, but I find this to be straightforward. Plus if you use the radial gradient you can create a cool looking “bubble mask” by drawing multiple black to white radial gradients with the Gradient tool’s  blend mode set to Darken – although I’ve never actually used a bubble mask like this for anything useful – but I’m sure that someone has!

2014_12_Grad04

5:07 AM Permalink
October 16, 2014

Live Shapes Properties in Photoshop CC 2014

When selecting Live Shape layers, the Properties panel now displays the Live Shape properties by default (instead of the mask properties). Use the icons at the top of the Properties panel to toggle between the Live Shape and Masks properties.

2014_10_14LiveShapesLR

5:57 AM Permalink
July 11, 2014

Inverting a Quick Mask in Photoshop

Option -click  (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on the Quick Mask icon to invert the selection when entering Quick Mask mode.

5:48 AM Permalink
June 20, 2014

Video Tutorial – Masking Images to Shapes & Type

There are a number of different techniques for displaying a photograph within type or other graphics. In this quick tip, you’ll learn how to apply a clipping mask to a layer group enabling you to mask multiple layers at once while keeping the type, the graphics and the photograph re-editable.

10:30 AM Permalink
June 5, 2014

Refining the Edge of a Mask in Photoshop

If a section of a mask isn’t quite correct, try using the Dodge or Burn tool in the mask to subtly adjust the edge (by lightening or darkening the grayscale values within the transitional area). In this example, the original mask is too soft and as a result, we can see  a green halo around the edge of the leaf.

The original mask shows a green fringe around the edge of the leaf.

Looking at the original mask, we can see that the edge of the mask needs to be reduced in width as well as shifted towards the edge of the leaf. Note: This is also known as “choking” the mask. Moving in the other direction would be “spreading” the mask.

The original mask's transitional area needs to be reduced and shifted into (choked) the leaf.

Using the Burn tool on the mask’s edge, darkens the values in the transitional areas of the mask, narrowing the transitional area and moving the mask in towards the leaf. (I realize that the change is subtle in this illustration, but notice how the edge of the mask in the illustration below appears sharper than in the illustration above.)

Using the burn tool on the transitional edge of the mask (in the grayscale areas), darkened the

As a result of choking the mask, the green halo is removed from around the edge of the leaf.

adfg

 

5:11 AM Permalink
May 16, 2014

Masking Video for Special Effects – Photoshop Playbook

Lex and Bryan asked me to do a guest appearance on the Photoshop Playbook series, so here’s How to Mask Video to Create Special Effects.


Now let’s go make something fun!  : )

10:00 AM Permalink
February 18, 2014

“The Art of Photoshop Compositing” Now Live on lynda.com!

I’m really excited to announce that my new class: The Art of Photoshop Compositing is now live  on www.lynda.com! 

2014_02_17_JKost_CompLR

“Join Julieanne Kost as she walks you through her creative thought process and explains how she transforms concepts and raw images into entirely new works of art using Adobe Photoshop. Discover how to select the images you need to create a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts. Master the tools used in compositing, including adjustment layers, masking, blending, and Smart Objects, so that the technology doesn’t get in the way of expressing your creative vision. Learn how to adjust scale and perspective and manipulate texture and focus to help viewers temporarily suspend their disbelief long enough to enter your world.”

Topics include:

  • What makes a good composite?
  • Refining your story
  • Composing using the basic principles of design
  • Customizing your Photoshop workspace
  • Preparing elements from your source images
  • Adjusting color, tone, balance, and perspective
  • Mastering the Pen tool
  • Unifying with texture, focus, leading lines, and structure

I look forward to hearing your feedback!

5:00 AM Permalink
January 8, 2014

The Adjustment Brush Overlay in Lightroom

When painting with the Adjustment Brush in the Develop Module in Lightroom, tap the “O” key to Show/Hide Mask Overlay. Add the Shift key to cycle the mask overlay colors (red, green and white). Displaying the mask overlay can make it much easier to see areas the areas that are included/excluded from the adjustment in order to make refinements to the mask. 

5:02 AM Permalink
February 27, 2013

Video Tutorial – 5 Reasons to Use Layer Groups in Photoshop

Layer Groups — they’re not just for organizing your layers! In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates 5 ways to use Layer Groups to create special effects in Photoshop.

5:16 AM Permalink
February 26, 2013

Moving and Copying Vector Layer Masks in Photoshop

• Drag a vector mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to move it from one layer to another.

• Option -drag (Mac) | Alt  -drag (Win) the vector mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to make a copy of the vector mask.

• Command + Shift -drag (Mac) | Control  + Shift -drag (Win) the vector mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to make an “inverted” copy of the vector mask.

5:14 AM Permalink