Posts tagged "Metadata"

August 18, 2015

Adobe Bridge CC Essential Training on Lynda.com

I’m happy to announce that my Adobe Bridge CC Essential Training course is now available on Lynda.com! Here is the course description:

Learn to use Bridge CC to efficiently manage and organize media assets of all kinds. Adobe evangelist Julieanne Kost shows how to download photos from a camera into Bridge, rename the files, add metadata, and view, rate, and label photos. She also shows how to share the best images with filters and collections, and showcase them in slideshows.

Topics Include:

•Importing photos

•Batch renaming files

•Adding metadata

•Saving collections and Smart Collections

• Organizing images into stacks

5:42 AM Comments (2) Permalink
August 4, 2015

How to add Metadata After Importing Files into Lightroom

In this quick tip, Julieanne shows how to add presets/templates using the Metadata panel.

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May 13, 2015

Lightroom CC – Using Filters to Quickly Find Photos

Discover how to quickly find the images using Filters in Lightroom.

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May 1, 2015

Quick Tip – Adding Copyright and Contact Information to Photographs in Lightroom

In this quick tip, you’ll learn how to add contact and copyright information to your photographs by creating and saving Metadata presets.

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February 12, 2014

Finding Files Based on Date in Lightroom

Although you can use the Metadata filter to quickly find files based on capture date, if you already have an image selected and are looking to view other images captured on that same date, clicking the arrow icon to the right of the Capture Date in the Metadata panel will quickly filter the entire library (based on the capture date of the selected image). 

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December 19, 2013

Lightroom Files Can Contain Multiple Dates

Lightroom can display up to three different dates for a file in the Metadata panel: Date Time Original, Date Time Digitized and Date Time. Note: try setting the Metadata panel’s preset to EXIF to display them all. Here’s the explanation of when and why you might need these different dates:

• Date Time Original – This is the moment in time that is shown in the picture.  In other words, if you were at a new year’s eve party last year and took a picture at one minute before midnight, the Date Time Original of that picture is 12/31/2012 11:59 PM.

• Date Time Digitized – This is the moment in time at which the picture was committed to digital form.  For photos from a digital camera, this will always be identical to Date Time Original.  For film, it wouldn’t be.  For example, if you’d taken that new year’s eve picture on film, then waited exactly six months to scan (i.e., digitize) the film the Date Time Original would still be 12/31/2012 11:59 PM, but the Date Time Digitized would be 6/30/2013 11:59 PM.

• Date Time – This is the file creation date.  Again, for a picture from a digital camera that you haven’t mucked with, this will be identical to the previous two fields.  But if you generate a new file from the picture (using covert to DNG, as in your example, or via other means such as creating a PSD by editing in Photoshop) then this field will show the date on which the new file was created.  In other words, if you edited your new year’s eve picture in Photoshop at noon today, generating a new PSD in the process, the Date Time for the new file would be today’s date 12pm.

For most ordinary people shooting with a digital camera, the only field they care about is Date Time Original, and the only reason to ever edit it is if the clock on their camera was set incorrectly for some reason when they took the picture.  For example, if you’d traveled from California to New York for that new year’s party, and forgot to adjust your camera’s clock to account for the time zone change, then that picture you took would show a Date Time Original of 12/31/2012 8:59 PM.  Since you know that’s not correct, you would probably want to edit the capture time and use the “Shift by a set number of hours” option to move the Date Time Original field ahead by three hours.

Thank you so much Ben for this excellent explanation!

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December 18, 2013

How to Change Capture Time in Lightroom 5

In this episode of The Complete Picture (How to change Capture time in Lightroom 5), Julieanne demonstrates two ways to change the capture time of your images. The first enables you to offset a time zone change and the second supports a custom adjustment to align multiple cameras used to shoot one event but with different date/time settings in-camera.

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September 26, 2013

How Lightroom Works with Metadata from Other Applications

Lightroom can understand changes made in Bridge and Camera Raw (such as the addition of metadata like copyright and contact information as well as enhancements made using ACR such as modifications made to Color Temperature or Exposure). By default however, if you open a file in Bridge and make changes to the Metadata, Lightroom will NOT automatically update the Metadata. Instead, Lightroom displays an icon warning that the file has been changed by an external application.

Lightroom displays an icon to notifying us that these files were changed in an external application.

Lightroom displays an icon to notifying us that changes have been made to these files in an external application.

You can then choose whether or not you want to use the updated Metadata from Bridge/Camera Raw or use the information in Lightroom’s database. To update the file with the external application’s Metadata, click the icon and choose “Import Settings from Disk” (or select the file in the Grid view and choose Metadata > Read Metadata from File). If the information in the Lightroom database is correct, choose Overwrite Settings.

Note: Additional software applications that follow the XMP standard should also be able to read/write Lightroom and Photoshop’s metadata.

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March 28, 2013

Saving the Original File Name in Lightroom

Lightroom automatically saves the original file name in the metadata of the file. In the Metadata panel, (in the header area where you can choose from a number of different ways to display the panel), choose the “EXIF and IPTC” or “Location” display options and you will see the “Original Filename” filed.

17_OriginalFileName

 

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March 5, 2013

Naming Virtual Copies in Lightroom

By default, when creating Virtual Copies, Lightroom automatically gives each Virtual Copy a sequential copy name: “Copy 1”, “Copy 2”, “Copy 3”, etc. To create a custom name for each Virtual Copy, in the Metadata panel (in the Library module) type the preferred name in the “Copy Name” field.

11_JKost_Copyss

Note: to see the custom file name in the Grid or Loupe views, you may need to make a change under View >View Options. In the example below, I have set my view options to “Show Grid Extras: Expanded Cells” and my “Expanded Cell Extras” to “Copy Name or File Base Name”. Note that you can also choose to see both Copy and File name.

11_JKost_View

 

For more information on Virtual Copies, you may want to watch this video tutorial.

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August 28, 2012

Removing Metadata From a File in Lightroom

Occasionally I need to remove IPTC metadata from a file when I demo Photoshop and Lightroom. In order to do this quickly, I’ve created a metadata template which has blank fields AND a check to the right of each field. When applied, Lightroom replaces the metadata that I entered in the previous demo with the “blank” data so that I can demonstrate adding it again.

 Be careful with this one – I once wiped out an entire years worth of keywords that I had applied.

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February 22, 2012

Lightroom – Renaming Using Metadata

When you create a file naming template, inserting  tokens (such as Date, Image Name and Metadata), tells Lightroom to use that information (on a file-by-file basis) from the metadata of each individual file. If you prefer to enter your own information, either type it directly into the text entree box (this embeds it as part of the template), or add the Custom Text token (which will allow you to create a template which gives you the opportunity to enter custom text like a client name  without having to edit the template).

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November 30, 2011

Video Tutorial – Quick Tip – How to add Metadata After Importing Files

In this quick tip, Julieanne shows how to add presets/templates using the Metadata panel.

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November 28, 2011

LR3 – Working with Keywords

There are several shortcuts that can help when working with keywords in Lightroom:

• Command + K (Mac) | Control + K (Win) will highlight the Keyword text entry field.

• Command + Shift + K (Mac) | Control  + Shift + K will highlight the larger, Applied Keyword box above it.

In addition, the Painter tool can be “loaded” with a keyword(s):

• Command + Option + Shift + K (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + K (Win) will display the Set Keyword Shortcuts dialog box where you can  set the Painters tool’s keyword. Then, with the Painter tool, simply click on any image in the Grid view to apply that keyword. Click-drag across multiple images to apply the keyword to several images.

• If the painter tool is set to apply keywords, Shift + K will remove the Painter tool’s keyword from the image.

Finally, Option + 1-9 (Mac) | Alt + 1-9 (Win) applies keywords from a keyword set when using the number pad on an extended keyboard. Holding the Option + (Mac) | Alt (Win) key displays the numeric shortcuts next to the Keyword Set so that you can see which number will apply what keyword.

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October 13, 2011

LR3 – Private (or Non-Exporting) Keywords

In Lightroom you can mark a keyword so that it doesn’t export by double clicking on the keyword in the Keyword panel and unchecking Include on Export. This may come in handy when using hierarchical keywords. For example, you might have France, Germany and Italy all under the parent keyword “Countries” to make them easy to find. However you don’t necessarily want the “Countries” keyword to be exported.

At this point some of you might be thinking of adding a  “nickname” for your client – perhaps something that you wouldn’t want them to see. If you want my advice – don’t do it. Seriously, accidents happen.

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