Posts tagged "Saving Files"

September 18, 2014

49/50 – Automatic Asset Creator – Generator in Photoshop CC

If you need to automatically generate assets from individual (or groups of) layers in Photoshop, then you should check out Adobe Generator in Photoshop CC (File > Generate > Image Assets). By using specific parameters to name files, Photoshop can automatically create JPEG, PNG or GIF images.

For example, if you mock up a web page and then want Photoshop to export individual graphics, you can name a layer with the desired extension: banner.gif or photo.jpg or logo.png. If you need more than one version (different file formats for example) for the same layer, add a comma between the names:  photo.jpg, photo.png Note: you can also use the plus (+) symbol instead of the comma.

JPEG assets are generated at 90% quality by default. PNG assets are generated as 32-bit images by default. GIF assets are generated with basic alpha transparency. If you need to set additional options for file formats, include them in the layer name as well:

• For JPEG files, set the compression quality by naming the layer (or layer group) to  photo.jpg5 or photo.jpg50% to give you an asset set to 50% compression quality.

• For PNG files, set the options for logo.png.8, logo.png.24, or logo.png.32

When exporting assets, if no size is determined, then the asset will be generated at the same size as the original. However, you are also able to  determine the size of the image that you want Photoshop to output using the layer name. The size goes at the beginning of the layer name and can be set in pixels, inches, percentage (%) and/or mm. Do not put a space between the numeric value and the unit of measurement. For example, 40px x 40px logo.png will generate an asset while 40 px x 40 px logo.png will not. You also need to leave a space between the size and the layer name. If you don’t add any units, then Photoshop will assume that you want pixels. For example:

200% banner.jpg will create a JPEG file that is 200% of the original

40 x 40 logo.png will create a png file 40 x 40 pixels (as would 40px x 40px logo.png)

2in x 60 graphic.gif will create a GIF file 2 inches by 60 pixels.

As you can see by the last example, you can mix the units of measurements. You can also use the question mark “?” to choose one dimension and simply have Photoshop resize the asset proportionally (similar to setting the long (or short) dimension of a file when exporting in Lightroom, Saving images in Camera Raw, or using the Fit Image option in Photoshop (File > Automate).

Before automatically generating assets, you must first choose File > Generate Image Assets. This “enables” Generator. Photoshop will save all of the necessary assets in a subfolder alongside the source PSD file. Note: If you have not saved the source file, then Photoshop will save the assets to the desktop.

A few last tips:

• Name a layer group to have all of the layers within the group saved as one asset.

• Do not use illegal characters (such as / \ : * etc) – no asset will be generated.

• If you clip a layer to a shape, name the topmost clipped layer to generate the asset.

• If your layer extends beyond the visible image area (or if it’s partially hidden by another layer), all of the content will be exported.

This help document is also informative: Generate image assets from layers in Photoshop CC

 

5:40 AM Comments (0) Permalink
August 13, 2014

23/50 – New Save Image Options in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

As many of you know, batch saving multiple images from Camera Raw, can be a significant time saver.

2014_08_06_SaveImage

In Camera Raw in Photoshop CC, the Save Image options have been updated to  include Color Space, Image Sizing and Output Sharpening. This gives us the benefit of being able to quickly save out our images using the Save Image button without having to change our current workflow settings.

2014_08_06_SaveOptions

And, if you use the same Save Image setting again and again, be sure to save them as presets so that they’re easily accessible.

5:02 AM Permalink
December 4, 2013

Video Tutorial – How to Optimize Lightroom 5

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Video Tutorial – How to Optimize Lightroom 5), Julieanne shares several suggestions for hardware, software, and preferences to help optimize the performance of Lightroom. Keeping these tips in mind when setting up a new system or refining your current system will help speed up Lightroom and make you more productive.


 

8:32 AM Permalink
January 7, 2013

Close All Files in Photoshop

Although this is not a new feature, it’s one that I constantly forget to mention (thank you Jeff Tranberry for reminding me). If you have several images open in Photoshop, you can choose File > Close All (instead of File > Close). When asked if you if you want to save changes, Photoshop also give you the option to Apply to All so that you can save them all (or not) without further prompts.

 

5:05 AM Permalink
June 14, 2012

Image Processor – JPEG Quality Scale

When using the Image Processor feature in Photoshop (File > Scripts > Image Processor) or Bridge (Tools > Photoshop > Image Processor), enter a value between 1-12 for JPEG quality (1 being the lowest quality and 12 being the highest). Since some applications have a scale from 1-10 or 1-100, I thought that it would be helpful to point out the range.

5:04 AM Permalink
October 17, 2011

A Dozen of my Favorite Little Known Features in PSCS5

In a recent presentation I was asked to share some “lesser” known features from Photoshop CS5. I have noted all of the following in my blog at some point, but here are a dozen of my favorites all together:

1) Changing Brush Size – With a painting tool selected, Control + Option (Mac) – drag left/right in order to decrease/ increase brush size. To decrease/ increase brush hardness, drag up/down. On Windows, Shift + Alt -drag left right to decrease/ increase brush size and up/down decrease/ increase brush hardness.

2) On Screen Color Picker – To access the new HUD color Picker, with a painting tool selected, Control + Option + Command (Mac) -click and drag to select a color. On Windows, Shift + Alt + right-click and drag to select a color. Or, if that shortcut is too much to remember, to display the color picker using a keyboard shortcut, choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. Under the Shortcuts for “Tools” scroll to the bottom to locate the “Foreground Color Picker ” line item and enter in your own custom keyboard shortcut.

3) The Eyedropper Tool – Clicking in the image area with the Eyedropper tool now displays a sample ring. The “new” color (the one being sampled) is displayed in the upper half of the ring while the current (or foreground color before sampling) is displayed in the bottom half. The ring is surrounded by grey to help neutralize surrounding colors that may influence color choices. The sample ring can be toggled off/on by unchecking/checking Show Sample Ring in the Options bar. Or, if you’re an avid user of Tool presets, make one with the ring turned on, the other with it off. In addition Control (Mac) / Right Mouse (Win) -click to select the Sample Size or Copy the Color as Hex Code or HTML

4) Scrubby Zoom – With the Zoom tool selected, click-drag to the right to zoom in, click-drag to the left to Zoom out. This new feature adds the benefit of being able to quickly zoom in AND zoom out to a specific location, however, if you prefer the legacy behavior (click-drag over the area to zoom into), disable Scrubby Zoom in the Options Bar. In addition, when viewing multiple images simultaneously, Shift -drag with the Hand tool to pan all open documents. Similarly, shift -clicking with the Zoom tool will zoom all images simultaneously. To set this as the default behavior, with the Zoom or Hand tool selected, check the “Zoom all Windows” and/or “Pan all Windows” in the Option bar.

5) Saving 16 Bit Images as JPEG – If you’re working with 16 bit files and want to save them as a JPEG, you can now select the JPEG file format from the list in the Save As dialog box. However, you need to know that saving as a JPEG will convert the file from 16 bit down to 8 bit (as the JPEG file format does not support 16 bit). Note: it is also important to note if you’re saving a layered file as a JPEG, Photoshop will flatten the file as the JPEG file format does not support layers.

6) Saving Files to Their Original Folders  – By default, when saving files, Photoshop will automatically navigate to the folder where the last file was saved. To save files to their original folder, select Preferences > File Handling > and check on the “Save As to Original Folder” option.

7) Auto-Select Parameter for Adjustment Layers  – In order to automatically put the keyboard focus onto the first field in the Adjustment panel, use the fly out menu in the Adjustments panel, and select Auto-Select Parameter (this behavior was added as it is similar to the legacy way of working with image adjustment dialog boxes – as oppose to the adjustment panel). Return (Mac) / Enter (Win) + Shift is another way to put the keyboard focus onto the first field in the Adjustment panel. You can also use a keyboard shortcut to select the Targeted Adjustment Tool while using a Hue/Saturation, Curves, or Black & White adjustment layer, choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. Under the Shortcuts for “Tools” scroll the towards the bottom of the list to locate the “Targeted Adjustment Tool” line item and enter in your own custom keyboard shortcut.

8)The Crop Tool Overlay – With the Crop tool selected, drag out the crop marquee and then, in the Options bar, choose Between Rule of Thirds, Grid or None for the Crop Guide Overlay. Note, you must first drag out the crop in the image area for this setting to appear in the Options bar.

9) Control Change the Opacity/Fill of Multiple Layers  – Simply select multiple layers in the Layers panel and use the Opacity and/or Fill slider to change the Opacity/Fill of all selected layers at once.

10) Layer Styles – In order to customize the default Layer Style settings, select Layer > Layer Style (or click the fx icon at the bottom of the Layers panel). In the Layer Style dialog, make the desired changes, and click the Make Default button. If you make changes to the style and want to reset the changes to your custom default, click the Reset to Default button.

11) Panorama Stitching  – When using the Auto-Align Layers command Photoshop now leverages lens correction profiles (if applied).

12) Non-rotating Brushes with Rotate View – When using the Rotate View tool to rotate the canvas for easier drawing and painting, the brushes will no longer rotate with the canvas rotation; instead they remain at the orientation of the original artwork regardless of the viewing angle.

4:54 AM Permalink
October 5, 2011

Video Tutorial – Opening Files from Lightroom into Photoshop – FAQ

In this episode of the Complete Picture (Opening Files from Lightroom into Photoshop), I hope to help you avoid unwanted or puzzling results by answering the three most frequently asked questions around opening and round-tripping files from Lightroom to Photoshop.

 

4:31 AM Permalink
September 8, 2011

LR3 – Where are Settings Saved for Virtual Copies?

The adjustments (settings) made to a virtual copy are stored in the Lightroom catalog.

Note: The settings for the Master file are saved in the Lightroom catalog as well, but can also be saved within the original DNG file (or in a sidecar file if working with proprietary raw files) if, in Catalog Settings > Metadata “Automatically Write Changes to XMP” is enabled and/or if Metadata > Save Metadata to Files is applied to files when finished editing images. To save settings in JPEG, PSD and TIFF files, check “Include Develop settings in Metadata inside JPEG, TIFF and PSD files” in Catalog Settings > Metadata.

4:34 AM Permalink
September 7, 2011

LR3 – Questions (and Answers) from Yesterdays Post About Metadata

1) Is there a way to make the Caption field in the Metadata panel larger?

Yes. You can select the “Large Caption” view from the drop down menu in the Metadata panel header (to the left of the word Metadata).

2) Are an image’s Develop Settings saved in the metadata of an image?

By default Lightroom saves changes made to an image in the catalog. I would suggest, however that you also choose to copy the information from the catalog into the individual files. To do this, either check “Automatically Write Changes to XMP” in Catalog Settings > Metadata and/or select Metadata > Save Metadata to Files when finished editing images. Either way, the Develop settings will be saved in a sidecar file for proprietary raw files, inside a DNG file and inside a JPEG, PSD and TIFF file if you have enabled “Include Develop settings in Metadata inside JPEG, TIFF and PSD files” in Catalog Settings > Metadata.

3) Is the History saved in an image’s metadata?

No, the History (in the Develop Module) is saved only in the Lightroom catalog.

 

4:10 AM Permalink
August 5, 2011

Video Tutorial – Saving Changes (Metadata) to Files in Lightroom

Command (Mac) / Control (Win)  + S copies any changes made to a photograph from LR’s database into individual DNG, JPEG, PSD, and TIFF files (or XMP sidecar files for proprietary raw files). Note: the data (change) is also kept in the Lightroom database). To automatically write changes into files (or into XMP sidecar files) choose Catalog Settings > Metadata > Automatically Write Changes into XMP. Click below to watch a 10 minute in-depth movie about this process.

Saving Changes to your Photographs in Lightroom 3

In this episode, Julieanne Kost will explain how changes made to photographs are saved automatically to the Lightroom Catalog. Then Julieanne will demonstrate how to use both the “Save Metadata to Files” command as well as the “Automatically write changes to XMP” Catalog Setting to push changes made to photographs from the catalog into individual files (or sidecar files) so that they can be read and utilized within additional applications such as Adobe Bridge.

 

 

 

4:34 AM Permalink
July 27, 2010

Saving 16 Bit Images as JPEG

PSCS5 – If you’re working with 16 bit files and want to save them as a JPEG, you can now select the JPEG file format from the list in the Save As dialog box. However, you need to know that saving as a JPEG will convert the file from 16 bit down to 8 bit (as the JPEG file format does not support 16 bit). Note: it is also important to note if you’re saving a layered file as a JPEG, Photoshop will flatten the file as the JPEG file format does not support layers.

6:02 AM Permalink
July 26, 2010

Saving Files to Their Original Folders

PSCS5 – By default, when saving files, Photoshop will automatically navigate to the folder where the last file was saved. To save files to their original folder, select Preferences > File Handling > and check on the “Save As to Original Folder” option.

6:01 AM Permalink
June 16, 2010

Maximize Compatibility

PSCS5 – In order to save a layered Photoshop file with a high resolution preview for other applications to use (Lightroom for example), it is necessary for Photoshop to create a “flattened” version of the image and save this flattened version within the file. I would recommend that you enable the option even though it will make the file size larger. To have Photoshop automatically save the flattened version, choose Preferences > File Handling > Maximize PSD and PSB File Compatibility… choose Always. In PSCS5, we added a “Don’t Show Again” check box when saving which will set the preference to Always.

5:44 AM Permalink
April 8, 2010

Changed Document Warning

If any changes have been made to an open file, an asterisk (*) appears at the far right of the document’s title bar. Note: this is not the Color Space Mismatch warning (which is displayed within the parenthesis containing the color space and bit depth), the Changed document warning appears to the right of that.

4:16 AM Permalink
October 16, 2009

Save for Web

Option (Mac) / Alt (Win) while in the Save for Web dialog box will change the Cancel button to Reset and the Done button to Remember (click Remember to save the current setting as your default).

5:58 AM Permalink