Posts tagged "Shape Tools"

July 22, 2014

7/50 Disabling Photoshop’s Properties Panel from Auto Showing on Shape Creation

In Photoshop CC, adding a Rectangle, Rounded Rectangle, or Ellipse shape layer (using the Shape tools) automatically displays the Properties panel making it easier to access the “Live Shape” Properties. But sometimes I find that having the Properties panel automatically popping out from its iconic view can be distracting. To stop this “auto-reveal” behavior, from the Properties panel’s fly-out menu, uncheck “Show on Shape Creation”. Note: you must have a Shape layer with Live Shape Properties to access this fly-out menu.
45PropPanel1

5:17 AM Permalink
July 21, 2014

6/50 – Re-Editable Rounded Rectangles in Photoshop CC (Live Shapes)

Photoshop CC has the ability to create “live shapes” (or re-editable) with rounded corners using the Rectangle, Rounded Rectangle and/or Ellipse Shape tools. To do so, drag out the desired rectangle, then use the Properties panel to round the corners (use the link icon to round them all at once, or each one independently). And, when used in combination with Smart Objects, the can be even more powerful! This video will show you how:

4:58 AM Permalink
September 24, 2013

Live Shape Layer Properties

In Photoshop CC, adding  a Rectangle, Rounded Rectangle and/or Ellipse Shape layer (using the Shape tools) displays the Properties panel making it easier to access the Live Shape Properties. To stop this this auto-reveal behavior, in Photoshop CC (v14.1), from the Properties panel’s fly-out menu, uncheck “Show on Shape Creation”. Note: you must have a Shape layer with Live Shape Properties to access this fly-out menu. 45PropPanel1

5:12 AM Permalink
September 13, 2013

Path Arrangement in Photoshop

The arrangement of paths (sometimes referred to as their stacking order), as well as path selection is critical when assigning path operations.

In the illustration below, the the circles in the first group were drawn  from left to right  on the same shape layer with the path operation set to Combine Shapes. In the second grouping, the middle circle was selected and the path operation was changed to Exclude Overlapping Shape. Because path operations only affect paths below the selected path, only the first circle was affected. In the last grouping, the center circle was selected and the Path Operation was also set to Exclude Overlapping Shapes. However, the center circle’s arrangement (stacking order) was then changed by selecting Bring Shape to Front using the Path Arrangement icon in the options bar. By changing it’s path arrangement to the top of the stack, the middle circle now affects all paths below it.

shapes03

The illustration below is an attempt to show the stacking order of the paths in the above illustration from a different view.

41PathAlignment

5:23 AM Permalink
September 12, 2013

Path Operation Shortcuts in Photoshop CC

While drawing shapes, use the following shortcuts to apply path operations. (Path operations change the way that shapes in Photoshop can interact with each other.)

• Shift -drag adds a newly drawn shape to the current shape layer and combines it if the two paths overlap (and the path selection operation in the Option bar toggles to Combine Shapes).

• Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) -drag adds a newly drawn shape to the current shape layer and subtracts the new path if the two paths overlap (and the path selection operation in the Option bar toggles to Subtract Front Shape). Note: after you start drawing the second path using this shortcut keyboard modifier, you can release  to drag the shape from the corner instead of the center.

• Option + Shift (Mac) | Alt  + Shift (Win) -drag adds a newly drawn shape to the current shape layer and displays the intersection of the shapes  if the two paths overlap (and the path selection operation in the Option bar toggles to Intersect Shape Areas).

• I do not know of a shortcut to access the Exclude Overlapping Shapes path operation.

To apply path operations to shape layers after they are created, select the desired path(s) and use the following shortcuts:

• Tap the + (plus) key to Combine Shapes (set the path operation in the Option bar to Combine Shapes).

• Tap the – (minus) key to Subtract the front shape (set the path operation in the Option bar to Subtract Front Shape).

•Tap the / (Forward slash key) to set the path operation to Intersect Shape Areas. Note: this shortcut was added to Photoshop CC.

• Tap the * (multiply) key to set the path operation to Exclude Overlapping Shapes. Note: this shortcut requires input from an extended keyboard (shift + 8 for * does not work). This shortcut was also added to Photoshop CC.

The first path

Above are examples of: Combine Shapes, Subtract Front Shape, Intersect Shape Areas and Exclude Overlapping Shapes.

5:53 AM Permalink
August 14, 2013

Re-Editable Rounded Rectangles in Photoshop CC

Photoshop CC has the ability to create “live” (or re-editable) rounded corners using the Rectangle Shape tool. To do so, drag out the desired rectangle, then use the Properties panel to round the corners (each one independently or all at once using the link icon). For a video demonstration as well as an example of  using rounded rectangles as Smart Objects, click here (the rounded rectangle portion begins at 8:30).

5:06 AM Permalink
June 18, 2013

Video Tutorial – Adobe Photoshop CC: Favorite Features for Photographers

Now that Photoshop CC is shipping, be sure to check out this episode on Adobe TV, (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), where Julieanne will demonstrate her top 5 favorite features in Photoshop CC including the new Upright perspective correction, Radial Filter, and Advanced Healing Brush features in Adobe Camera Raw 8, Image Upsampling and Smart Sharpening, Live Shapes for Rounded Rectangles, and Camera Shake Reduction. (repost)

If you own Photoshop CS6 and are moving to Photoshop CC, you might also want to watch this video (Julieanne’s Top 5 Features for Photographers in Photoshop 13.1), to learn about the new features that were added to Photoshop 13.1 (released back in December 2012 for Creative Cloud Members).

2:05 AM Permalink
May 7, 2013

Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers

As many of you  know, this morning Adobe announced Photoshop CC. Although it’s not yet shipping, here is a video of my favorite features that will be available soon!

In this episode (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), Julieanne Kost will demonstrate her top 5 favorite features in Photoshop CC including the new Upright perspective correction, Radial Filter, and Spot Removal  features in Adobe Camera Raw 8, Image Upsampling and Smart Sharpening, Live Shapes for Rounded Rectangles, and Camera Shake Reduction.

If you own Photoshop CS6 and are moving to Photoshop CC, you might also want to watch this video (Julieanne’s Top 5 Features for Photographers in Photoshop 13.1 ), to learn about the new features that were added to Photoshop 13.1 (released back in December exclusively for Creative Cloud Members).

In addition, here is a great article with insights about Breaking from Tradition written by Maria Yap, Sr. Director of Product Management at Adobe.

And if you have questions, Jeff Tranberry provides answers in this FAQ – for Photoshop and Lightroom Customers.

And the Creative Cloud FAQ.

And information about Lightroom and Creative Cloud.

6:30 AM Permalink
September 14, 2012

Improved Path Behavior in Photoshop CS6

Photoshop CS6 has changed the default behavior when dragging vector curves. After creating a path, dragging on a curve (line segment) will reshape the path much more gracefully than in previous versions. If however, you like the legacy behavior, select the Path Selection or Direct Selection tool and check Constrain Path dragging in the Option bar.

5:20 AM Permalink
September 12, 2012

Adding a Gradient Stroke on a Shape Layer in Photoshop CS6

When adding a Solid Color stroke to a shape layer in Photoshop, I achieved the results that I expected. However when I added a Gradient stroke to a shape layer, I was surprised at the results. Photoshop is drawing a gradient and then clipping it to appear within the width of the stroke. Of course you can change the look of the gradient by changing the style (Linear, Radial etc) but if you want a gradient to be applied either along a stroke or across a stroke, then you might need to step into Illustrator. The following graphic shows the different ways that Photoshop and Illustrator can apply strokes to shapes.

5:04 AM Permalink
September 11, 2012

Shape Layer Attributes – Photoshop CS6 and Illustrator CS6

If you copy and paste a shape from Illustrator to Photoshop, the results will differ depending on the type of layer selected:

• If a pixel layer is the selected layer in Photoshop, the pasted shape will take on the fill of the foreground color as set in the Tool bar.

• If a shape layer is the selected layer in Photoshop, the pasted shape will take on the fill from the options bar.

5:35 AM Permalink
May 18, 2012

Align to Pixel Grid in Photoshop CS6

When working with the Vector tools (drawing a Shape layer for example) Photoshop CS6 has a new preference to Snap Vector Tools and Transforms to Pixel Grid. This option can be extremely helpful when creating objects that need solid, straight edges as it prevents drawing shapes that aren’t fully aligned to a pixel and are therefore created with anti-aliased edges.

This illustration demonstrates three options, the first shape was drawn with the Snap Vector Tools and Transforms to Pixel Grid preference turned on and, as a result, all sides of the rectangle are solid (remember, even though the initial rectangle shape might not have been drawn in perfect alignment to the pixel grid, Photoshop automatically snapped the rectangle to that grid because the preference was turned on).

The middle illustration was drawn with the Snap Vector Tools and Transforms to Pixel Grid preference turned off. This resulted in anti-aliased edges (varying levels of opacity) because the rectangle (the vector path) was not perfectly aligned to a pixel edge when the rectangle was drawn.

The final illustration is the same rectangle as in the second illustration, however the Align Edges option was enabled for the rectangle shape layer (in the Options bar) after drawing the rectangle. Enabling the Align Edges option “jumped” the edges of the rectangle to the nearest pixel grid (you can still see that the original shape (path) is not aligned to the pixel grid, but the fill is being forced to Align Edges to the edges of the pixel grid. Align Edge is a good way to align objects on a “per shape layer” basis if you want to turn off the Snap Vector Tools and Transforms to Pixel Grid preference .

However, I expect that most people will leave the Snap Vector Tools and Transforms to Pixel Grid preference turned on as it will help to avoid anti-aliased edges when drawing shapes as well as transforming them making alignment clean and precise.

5:01 AM Permalink
May 17, 2012

Working with Strokes and Fills in Photoshop CS6

• After creating your own custom Stroke patterns (using the Stroke Options), save them as a preset. Don’t forget that you can save a Tool Preset in order to save all of the Options for the shape tool (fill, stroke, size etc.).

• To copy and paste the Fill or Stroke attributes from one shape to another, click the color swatch next to Fill or Stroke in the Options bar. Then, click the gear icon and choose Copy Fill (or Copy Stroke). Then select another Shape layer, click the color swatch next to Fill or Stroke, select the gear, and choose Paste Fill (or Paste Stroke).

• An even easier way to quickly apply the fill and shape from one layer to another is to Control -click (Mac) / Right Mouse -click (Win) on the layers panel (to the right of the layer name), and select Copy Shape Attributes (this will copy both the stroke and the fill unlike the tip above that copies one or the other). In the Layers panel, select the layer(s) to paste the attributes and Control -click (Mac) / Right Mouse -click (Win) and select Paste Shape Attributes.  Note: you can also Control -click (Mac) / Right Mouse -click (Win) directly on the layer in the image area, but it might be more difficult to select the layers to paste the attributes on.

• All shapes on a shape layer will have the same Fill and Stroke attributes. To apply different attributes to different shapes, put each shape on its own layer by selecting the shape and choosing Layer > New > Shape Layer Via Cut  or use the shortcut: Command + Shift + J (Mac) | Control  + Shift + J (Win). Note: when cutting a shape to its own layer and/or when merging 2 (or more) shape layers to the same layer, they no longer rasterize but remain vectors!

5:06 AM Permalink
May 16, 2012

Layer Panel Enhancements for Shape Layers in Photoshop CS6

• There is a new badge for shape layers in the Layers panel (Shape layers are no longer represented by a Fill layer with a vector mask).

• Although the Shape Layer icon (badge) has changed, you can still double-click the shape layer icon to change the color of the shape’s fill.

• Because shapes are often very small in relation to the entire image, the Layers panel displays the contents of shape layers as large as possible in the Layer thumbnail – ignoring the relationship of the shape to the entire document (as other layers appear by default).

• Selecting a Shape layer in the Layers panel automatically displays the path in the image area (making it easier to quickly edit the shape).

• Command + H (Mac) | Control + H (Win) hides the path.

• Clicking on a shape in the image area with the Path Selection tool will automatically select that layer in the Layers panel.

• If you delete all of the paths on a shape layer, the layer will automaticallly be deleted.

5:02 AM Permalink
May 15, 2012

Improvements to Shape Tool Options in Photoshop CS6

Several improvements were made to the shape layers (and vector tools) in Photoshop CS6. If you missed yesterday’s video, here is a quick list of changes that you’ll find in the Options bar when working with Shapes:

• Before drawing with the Pen or Shape tools, quickly select between Shape, Path or Pixels from the drop-down list (these options were previously represented by icons which was a bit confusing).

• Click the Fill and Stroke color swatches to choose the type of content: none (for a transparent shape), solid color, gradient and/or pattern.

• The Shape color picker (displayed when clicking on the Fill or Stroke swatch), keeps track of your Recently Used Colors. That would be nice throughout the application!

• Add a stroke, dash and/or dotted line to a path and customize its alignment, caps, corners, gap and dash amounts by clicking the Stroke Options icon in the Options bar.

• Easily change the height and width for shapes (without going to Free Transform) using the new numeric entry options.

• By default, the shape tools draw a new Shape Layer every time you click and drag with the tool. However, you can use the new Path Operations drop-down list in the Options bar (path operations were previously represented by icons) in order to add additional shapes to a single Shape Layer (including Combine, Subtract, Intersect, Extrude or Merge  Shape Components).

• With multiple shapes selected, use the Path Alignment and Path Arrangement drop-down lists to choose to align selected shapes (to the Selection or Canvas), distribute shapes, and/or change the stacking order of shapes.

• Specify a shape’s size by clicking (instead of dragging) in the image area. The Create Polygon (or Create Rectangle etc.) dialog appears, with all of the options specific to the selected Shape tool.

5:53 AM Permalink