Posts tagged "Smart Objects and Smart Filters"

August 20, 2014

28/50 – Converting Embedded Smart Objects and Packaging Linked Files in Photoshop CC

In the video below, you’ll discover how to convert an Embedded Smart Object to Linked as well as package your linked files when collaborating with others.

5:29 AM Comments (0) Permalink
August 19, 2014

27/50 – Linked Smart Objects in Photoshop CC

In the video below, you’ll learn when to embed and when to link Smart Objects,as well as how to update modified content, resolve missing files, and filter layers based on Smart Object attributes.

Note: at 7:21 I say that you can’t change an embedded Smart Object to a linked Smart Object (because this video was recorded before the 2014 release of Photoshop). However, if you run the update to the 2014 release of Photoshop you can now convert from embedded to linked and vice versa!

In addition, here are a few of the shortcuts that I mentioned in the video:
• Drag and drop a file from Bridge to an open document in Photoshop to create an embedded Smart Object.
• Option + (Mac) | Alt + (Win) drag and drop a file from Bridge to an open document in Photoshop to create a linked Smart Object. Note: this shortcut will also work if you drag and drop from Lightroom into an open Photoshop document on the Mac.
• Command + Option + Shift + E (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + E (Win) will edit the contents of a Smart Object.
• Shift -double click a raw file in Bridge to open it in Photoshop while bypassing the Camera Raw dialog.

Also, if you lose the linked smart object (or the linked smart object is off-line), Photoshop will still be able to print the document with high quality at the same size as it was saved (or smaller) because Photoshop includes a flattened version of the entire document within the PSD or TIFF file when saved (be sure to enable the option to Maximize PSD and PSB File Compatibility in the File Handling Preferences). This also means that even if the file is linked, you’re going to see a file size increase.

5:26 AM Comments (0) Permalink
August 8, 2014

20/50 – Camera Shake Reduction as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC

For anyone that has had to try to “salvage” a photograph that just wasn’t quite sharp enough, Photoshop’s Camera Shake Reduction filter can help remedy the situation. Check out the video below to see how Photoshop can help sharpen images with camera motion caused by slow shutter speeds or long focal lengths (i.e. the camera moves while capturing the image, not the subject).

5:13 AM Permalink
August 1, 2014

15/50 – Using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC to Create a High Dynamic Range ( HDR) Image

In the video below, we’re going to discover how easy it is to take multiple, bracketed exposures of the same scene and combine them into a single 32-bit HDR image that can then be edited nondestructively using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC. In addition, we’ll discover how powerful Camera Raw can be when applied to multiple layers as a Smart Object.

And just in case I wasn’t clear in the video, I want to point out why Adobe would include Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop CC. Well, here are the first three reasons that I can think of, but I’m sure that there are more!
• First of all, not everyone had the luxury of working with raw files so it can be a huge benefit to be able to apply options like clarity and perspective correction to non raw images (a Photoshop layer for example).
• Sometimes we forget to do things in the right order and we don’t have time to go back to the beginning and fix them when on deadline. Yes, this might not be optimal, and yes, we would be better off making changes earlier in our workflow (processing our raw files directly in Camera Raw before opening them in Photoshop), but Camera Raw as a filter can help to make corrections or add creative effects to layers later in your workflow and/or with legacy files.
• Camera Raw as a filter can be applied to multiple layers at one time (by selecting multiple layers in the Layers panel and converting them to a single Smart Object). Plus, working with Camera Raw as a Smart Filter enables blend mode and opacity options as well as a Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the filter.
Additional information can be found in this post.
Note: The following features are not available when using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter (that are normally available in Camera Raw), primarily because they don’t make sense in the filter context: Workflow options and preferences, crop and straighten tools, rotation tools (rotate left/right buttons), snapshots, camera and lens profile corrections.

5:06 AM Permalink
June 12, 2014

Refining a Selection with the Maximum and Minimum Filters in Photoshop

Although it is easy to use Select > Modify in order to expand or contract a selection by a specific number of pixels, for additional control, try using the Maximum and Minimum filters. To contract or expand a selection by a decimal number (not a whole number as is the limit for the Select > Modify command), first, make your selection, then click the Quick Mask icon to view the red overlay before selecting the filter (otherwise the filter will effect the pixels in the photo that you have selected). Then, choose Filter > Other > Minimum to contract the selection by a non-whole number or choose Filter > Other >  Maximum to expand the selection by a non-whole number.

Note: both of the filters are looking at the values of gray within the specified radius that you define. The Preserve Roundness option  will help keep round shapes round instead of being reduced using a more “rectangular” method which will cut corners when contracting. The Preserve Squareness will help keep rectangular shapes with more square edges from getting rounded. Both filters can be used for choke and spread operations on masks or images (removing dirt, enlarging bright points, etc.).

5:50 AM Permalink
January 21, 2014

Video Tutorial – How to Link Smart Objects in Photoshop CC

In this episode of The Complete Picture (How to Link Smart Objects in Photoshop CC), Julieanne will show you when to embed and when to link Smart Objects, update modified content, resolve missing files and filter based on smart object attributes.

• Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) drag and drop a file from Bridge to an open document in Photoshop to create a linked (not embedded) Smart Object. Note: this shortcut will also work if you drag and drop from Lightroom into an open Photoshop document on the Mac. 

• Command + Option + Shift + E (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + E (Win) will edit the contents of a Smart Object.

5:19 AM Permalink
December 13, 2013

Opening Multiple Files as Smart Objects in the Same Document

The ability to  open multiple files from Lightroom into Photoshop as Smart Objects and place them into a single document saves a significant amount of time when compositing. The only restriction is that you must first open a document in Photoshop. Since I typically work with a blank canvas to begin with, this requirement doesn’t bother me. Once you have your Photoshop document open, select the images in Lightroom (yes, you will have to be in Normal screen mode in Lightroom to do this) and drag and drop them on top of the open Photoshop document. Each image will be placed one at a time – displaying transformation handles for resizing to the desired size upon placement.

Select the files in Lightroom and drag and drop them onto your open document in Photoshop.

Select the files in Lightroom and drag and drop them onto your open document in Photoshop.

As you can see, all of the files are also automatically converted to smart objects as they are placed and the layer name takes on the original document’s name. Sweet!

The images are placed into the open document as Smart Objects.

The images are placed into the open document as Smart Objects.

Note: the options to “Resize Image During Place” as well as “Place or Drag Raster Images as Smart Object” are controlled in Photoshop’s General Preferences.

Update: Sorry, I think this is a Mac-only feature. If you know of a way to do this on Windows, please share!

5:19 AM Permalink
September 11, 2013

Additional Filters Available for 32-bit Files in Photoshop CC (v14.1)

Photoshop CC (v14.1) added 32-bit image support for a number of filters including:

Blur -> Blur and Blur More

Distort -> Displace, Pinch, Polar Coordinates, Ripple, Shear, Spherize, Twirl, Wave, and ZigZag

Pixelate -> Color Halftone, Crystallize, Facet, Fragment, Mezzotint, Mosaic, Pointilize

Render -> Fibers

Sharpen ->Sharpen and Sharpen More

Stylize -> Diffuse (anisotropic is disabled in 32 bit), Trace Contour

Other -> Custom

39filters

Note: in some of the examples above, changes have been made to opacity and blend mode.

5:20 AM Permalink
June 26, 2013

Merge to HDR Pro in Photoshop CC

There is a new feature when working in the Merge to HDR Pro feature in Photoshop CC. If you set the Mode to 32 bit, under the histogram is an option to “Complete Toning in Adobe Camera Raw”.

22.HDRPro1

Enabling this option, changes the “OK” button to “Tone in ACR”. Clicking “Tone in ACR” tells Photoshop to convert the 32 bit HDR layer into a Smart Object and automatically apply Camera Raw as a Smart Filter.

22.HDRPro3

 

Then, simply apply your desired settings in the Camera Raw Filter and click OK. Because you are working with a smart object, not only can you double click the layer thumbnail to re-edit the Camera Raw options, but you can also use the Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the effect AND change the Blend Mode and Opacity of the filter!

22.HDRPro2

Note: only the following Blend Modes are available when using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter: Normal, Dissolve, Darken, Multiply, Darker Color, Lighten, Linear Dodge (add), Lighter Color, Difference, Subtract, Divide, Hue, Saturation Color and Luminosity.

5:38 AM Permalink
June 20, 2013

Adobe Camera Raw as a Filter in Photoshop CC

I have received several questions as to why Adobe would include Camera Raw as a Filter in Photoshop CC. Well, here are the first three reasons that I can think of, but I’m sure that there are more!

• First of all, not everyone had the luxury of working with raw files so it can be a huge benefit to be able to apply options like clarity and perspective correction to non raw images (a photoshop layer for example).

• Sometimes we forget to do things in the right order and we don’t have time to go back to the beginning and fix them when on deadline. Yes, this might not be optimal, and yes, we would be better off making changes earlier in our workflow (processing our raw files directly in camera raw before opening them in Photoshop), but ACR as a filter can help to make corrections or add creative effects to layers later in your workflow and/or with legacy files.

• ACR as a filter can be applied to multiple layers at one time if you select those layers in the Layers panel and convert them to a smart object. Plus, working with Camera Raw as a smart filter enables blend mode and opacity options as well as the Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the filter.

Note: There are several features from regular Adobe Camera Raw that are omitted from Camera Raw as a filter, mostly because they don’t make sense in the filter context.

• Workflow options and preferences

• Crop  and  straighten tools

• Rotation tools (rotate left/right buttons)

• Snapshots

• Camera and lens profile

• ACR as Smart Object, save button

5:11 AM Permalink
April 11, 2013

Transforming a Regular Layer or Smart Object?

Did you know that when you’re transforming a Smart Object in Photoshop, the transformation’s anchor points are reversed out at the corners and displayed as light grey but when transforming a regular pixel based layer, the transformation’s anchor points are solid dark grey?

Transforming a Smart Object in Photoshop.

Transforming a Smart Object in Photoshop.

 

Transforming a regular (raster) layer in Photoshop.

Transforming a regular (raster) layer in Photoshop.

And that concludes today’s nerdy Photoshop trivia!  : )

 

 

5:41 AM Permalink
April 3, 2013

Applying Different Masks for Every Smart Filter in Photoshop

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Applying Different Masks for Every Smart Filter in Photoshop), Julieanne demonstrates how nesting Smart Objects enables each filter applied to have its own unique Smart Filter mask.

 

8:00 AM Permalink
March 11, 2013

How to Extract a Raw File with Modified Settings from a Smart Object in Photoshop

After posting my video Cyclical – The Creative Process I received a great question: If you start in Lightroom with a raw file and choose Photo > Edit In > Open  in Photoshop as Smart Object, and then edit that Smart Object, how can you “extract” that raw file  with the edited settings?

My first thought was to select the Smart Object in the Layers panel in Photoshop and choose Layer > Smart Objects > Export Contents. But surprisingly that method doesn’t export any edits made to the Smart Object. However, it turns out that the answer is even easier.  In Photoshop, simply double click on the Smart Object’s thumbnail in the Layers panel (or choose Layer > Smart Object > Edit Contents) and, in the Camera Raw dialog, click the Save Image button in the lower left corner. Voila.

 

5:46 AM Permalink
January 17, 2013

Applying Multiple, Masked Filters to a Layer in Photoshop

To apply multiple filters to a single layer – each with its own filter mask – convert the layer into a smart object (Layer > Smart Objects > Convert to Smart Objects). Apply the first smart filter and paint in the mask as desired. To apply the second filter, choose Layer > Smart Objects > Convert to Smart Object (essentially “nesting” one smart filter within another), apply the second filter and paint in the mask as desired. If you need to edit the settings or mask for the first filter, choose Layer > Smart Object > Edit Contents. This technique is also an excellent way to selectively sharpen and blur an image.

03_JKOST_SmartFilter1

In the illustration above, the High Pass filter was applied to the Smart Object (Layer 0) and then masked  so that it is limited to sharpening the cactus. Note: If you use the High Pass filter to sharpen an image, you can double-click the small icon to the right of the filter name in the Layers panel and set the blend mode to Overlay or Soft Light to remove the grayish look of the filter.)

03_JKOST_SmartFilter2After applying the first smart filter, choosing Layer > Smart Objects > Convert to Smart Object nests the first smart filter and allows the addition of another filter (in this example Oil Paint) with its own Smart Filter mask. 

5:39 AM Permalink
January 2, 2013

Video Tutorial – The Difference Between Duplicating a Smart Object and Creating New Smart Object via Copy

In this episode of The Complete Picture (The Difference Between Duplicating a Smart Object and Creating New Smart Object via Copy), Julieanne explains the difference between duplicating a Smart Object using the Layers panel to create multiple instances of a layer and creating a copy of a Smart Object using the application menu for independent editing.

 

5:40 AM Permalink