Posts tagged "The Basic Panel"

December 7, 2017

 Tasmania – Three Photos Before and After

I had time over the weekend to sit down and retouch some images from Tasmania and thought it might be interesting to write up a quick overview of the workflow. In a nutshell, the majority of edits were done in Lightroom Classic CC with a bit of retouching done in Photoshop CC. On the left are the original raw captures, the final images on the right.

First, for all three of the photographs, I used the Lens Correction panel to Remove Chromatic Aberration and Enable Profile Corrections. In fact I change Lightroom’s default settings to enable Lightroom to apply these setting on import (this post will tell you how). Then, I cropped as needed. From there on, each image needed slightly different settings, so I will walk through each image separately.

My experience of photographing the dead trees along the waterline at Lake Gordon, felt far more dramatic when I was there, so my intent was to impart that same dramatic feeling through post processing. Below is the original, raw capture.

I made the following “global” changes using the Basic, Effects, and Details panels:

  • Increased the Temperature value to add warmth to the image.
  • Set new white and black points to extend the dynamic range of the original “flat” photograph.
  • Increase Clarity to exaggerate edge contrast in the midtones.
  • Increased the Dehaze value, however this pushed some of the shadow areas too dark, so I returned to the Basic panel to refine the black point.
  • Increased the amount of  Luminance and Color Noise Reduction in the Details panel.

Moving to the local adjustment tools, I started by adding three separate Graduated Filters:

  • The first one (starting in  the upper left, and reaching almost into the center of the photo), decreases exposure and shifts the Temperature towards yellow.
  • The second one (starting in the lower left and moving slightly into the image), “burns” the edge by lowering the Exposure value.
  • And infamy, the last one (starting at the bottom and moving upwards towards the center pf the photograph), adds Contrast and lightens Highlights (helping to separate the tree trunks from the background).

Finally, I selected the Adjustment Brush and made several small local adjustments:

  • The first one decreases the Exposure to darken the top left corner.
  • The second emphasizes the rays of light using Dehaze and Contrast.
  • The third increases Exposure the shadows in the tree area on the right.
  • And the fourth and final one shifts the temperature slider towards yellow in the center of the photograph.

When photographing the second location, I was impressed by the patterns made by the water flowing over the  sandbar. At the time, there was a bird singing nearby, and I remember wondering what the bird’s audio waves would look like if we could see them in the water. Regardless, my goal was to  accentuate the waves and patterns in Lightroom.The original raw capture below, was admittedly underexposed .

After applying Lens Corrections, cropping, and setting new black and white points, I  decreased the Highlights (to retain detail in the sand), add a bit of Dehaze, and decreased Saturation. I find that when using Dehaze on an image such as this one (when I’m using it more “creatively” and not necessarily to remove atmospheric haze), the image becomes overly saturated so I tend to lower the Saturation – but of course it’s a personal choice.

Then, I added two local adjustments using the Adjustment Brush:

  • The first darkens the  top right area of the water by decreasing Exposure.
  • The second adds additional Dehaze to the sandbar.

I then opened the file into Photoshop (16-bit, Adobe RGB, PSD file at 300 PPI). Using a combination of the Healing Brush and the Clone Stamp tool, I proceeded to remove the distracting flecks of sand as well as the plant in the lower right of the image.

Before and after retouching the sand in Photoshop.

I prefer to work with the Healing Brush as it’s typically faster when removing small elements. However if  the edges of the “healed” area soften the grain/noise pattern in the image (or make it “mushy”), I’ll switch to the Clone Stamp tool (even though in some instances it may take longer to match the colors/tone in the photograph).

The third photograph was taken from the passenger seat of a car. While I know that this isn’t optimal, if we stopped every time we saw a opportunity for a photograph, we would never have made it to our final destination! In this image, I wanted to accentuate the clouds over the mountains, the sunlight on the trees and, and mooo-ve a cow to higher ground. Below is the the original, raw capture.

After using the Lens Correction panel to remove distortions, cropping, and setting black and white points, I adjusted the White Balance – increasing the Temperature and decreasing the Tint sliders to remove the colder, blue cast. Then, I decreased the Highlights (to bring back detail in the clouds) and increased the Shadows (to reveal details in the trees). I refined the midtones by decreasing Exposure and increasing Contrast and added a slight increase in Clarity, while decreasing Saturation.

Then, I added two local adjustments:

  • Using the Adjustment Brush with an increased Exposure value, I lightened the front view of the trees.
  • I also used the graduated filter over the mountains and clouds  (set to increase Dehaze and reduce Saturation), however this adjustment also amplified the reflection from the car window (above the mountain –  center frame).

In Photoshop, I copied, pasted, and repositioned a “good” area of cloud to cover the reflection and used a Curves Adjustment layer to match the tonal values of the surrounding clouds (to restrict the effects of the Curves Adjustment Layer, I selected it and chose Layer > Create Clipping Mask). I then removed the distracting fence posts and, because the lonely cow at the bottom of the image was so close to the edge, I repositioned it a bit higher in the frame.

Please check out my additional images from Tasmania, on Behance, as well as my Portfolio page, in an Adobe Spark.

5:09 AM Permalink
February 14, 2017

Setting White and Black Points in Lightroom CC

Shift double-click Whites  or Blacks (the name of the slider),  in the Basic panel in the Develop module in Lightroom to automatically set the white and black points in a photograph (to extend the dynamic range of the photograph across the entire histogram.

5:24 AM Permalink
May 20, 2015

Lightroom CC – Create Stunning Images using the Basic Panel

Learn how to make tonal and color enhancements to your photographs using the Basic panel in Lightroom.

5:38 AM Permalink
September 17, 2013

Camera Raw 8.2, Lightroom 5.2 now available!

Improvements made to both Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) in Photoshop include:

• Refinements to the Spot Removal/Healing tool include a new Feather slider to control the softness of the edge when cloning or healing areas of an image. In addition, there have been improvements in the way that the Spot Healing tool determines the auto source location (the area that it clones/heals from), so that it  now works better for images with textured areas. And, if the image has been cropped, the Spot Removal/Healing tool will bias the selection of the auto source location from within the crop rectangle (as opposed to auto-choosing image areas outside the crop).

• To help reduce low-frequency color mottling like you see on the left side of the illustration below, a new Color Smoothness adjustment slider has been added to the Color Noise Reduction options in the Detail Panel. When the amount is increased, the color mottling is removed (as you see on the right side of the illustration below).

43Detailsmoothing

In addition, several improvements were made to Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) as they are already available/not applicable in Lightroom.

• The Histogram is now interactive in ACR. This enables the ability to click and drag on the Histogram to adjust the Blacks, Shadows, Exposure, Highlights, and Whites slider adjustments in the Basic tab.

• ACR now has separate Auto Temperature and Auto Tint controls, which are applied by Shift -double clicking on either the Temperature or Tint adjustment sliders.

• Refinements to the Local Adjustment Brush include the ability to reposition brush adjustments by clicking and dragging on brush adjustment pins. In addition, Command + Option -drag (Mac) | Control + Alt -drag (Win) a Local Adjustment Brush pin will duplicate the pin and Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click(Win) will delete the pin. If you prefer, Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) displays both options – to duplicate or delete a pin.

• Workflow presets are now available for defining and then quickly choosing output settings in ACR. And, after creating your custom presets, you can Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) the workflow link to quickly switch between them. In addition, when changing image size, a new option for Percentage is available in the drop down menu.

43ACRWorkflow

• Save Image options now include Color Space, Image Sizing, Output Sharpening and Presets. This means that you can select the desired images and save them using Save Image presets without having to change your current workflow settings.

Click here for more information, about the Photoshop Photography Program.

5:31 AM Permalink
July 23, 2013

Video Tutorial – Create Stunning Images in LIghtroom 5

In this video tutorial (Create Stunning Images), Julieanne demonstrates how to create the highest quality photographs by removing lens distortion, cropping, correcting perspective, and making color and tonal corrections in Lightroom’s Develop module.

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5:13 AM Permalink
August 15, 2012

White Balance Settings for RAW and JPEG Files

The units of measurements displayed in the Basic panel (in Lightroom’s Develop module and in the Camera Raw dialog in Photoshop) for Temperature and Tint differ between RAW and JPEG files. When working with a raw file, the Temperature slider ranges from 2,000 to 50,000 Kelvin and the Tint sliders range from -150 to 150. When working with JPEG files (or other pixel based files such as PSD or TIFF) the Temperature and Tint sliders both range from -100 to 100.

You might also notice that when working with RAW files, Lightroom displays a list of “preset” White Balance settings (Auto, Daylight, Cloudy, Tungsten etc. – this list might differ slightly from camera to camera). When you work with a JPEG file, LIghtroom only displays As Shot, Auto and Custom in the pull-down menu

5:06 AM Permalink
April 19, 2012

Temperature and Tint Sliders in Lightroom 4

If you’ve noticed a difference in the range of values that appear to the right of the Temperature and Tint sliders in the Basic panel in Lightroom’s Develop module, it’s probably due to the fact that when working with Raw files, Lightroom displays values of  2000-50000 Kelvin  for Temperature, and -150 – +150 for Tint. When working with JPEG, both Temperature and Tint sliders display numeric values from -100 to +100.

5:03 AM Permalink
March 28, 2012

Video Tutorial – Lightroom 4 – Create Stunning Images

Learn how to create the highest quality photographs in this video tutorial, by learning how to crop, remove lens distortion, correct perspective, make global and local color and tonal corrections in the Lightroom 4 Develop module.

5:29 AM Permalink
December 6, 2011

LR3 – Quickly Navigating the Basic Panel

Quickly navigate  through the Basic Panel by tapping the “.”  (period) key . Then use the + and – keys to increase/decrease individual slider settings. Add the Shift key to move the sliders in larger increments.

5:59 AM Permalink
June 8, 2011

LR3 – The Basic Panel

Since the Basic panel is one of the most used panels, there are shortcuts to help move quickly from one slider to the next. Use the “.” (period) and “,” (comma) to move from one slider to the next and use the “+” (plus) and “-” (minus) keys to increase/decrease the slider’s value. Add the Shift key to move in larger increments and the Option (Mac) / Alt (Win) to move in smaller increments.

Note, for these shortcuts to work, you must click on the name of the slider – not the text entree area.

 

4:10 AM Permalink