Posts tagged "The Develop Module"

December 7, 2017

 Tasmania – Three Photos Before and After

I had time over the weekend to sit down and retouch some images from Tasmania and thought it might be interesting to write up a quick overview of the workflow. In a nutshell, the majority of edits were done in Lightroom Classic CC with a bit of retouching done in Photoshop CC. On the left are the original raw captures, the final images on the right.

First, for all three of the photographs, I used the Lens Correction panel to Remove Chromatic Aberration and Enable Profile Corrections. In fact I change Lightroom’s default settings to enable Lightroom to apply these setting on import (this post will tell you how). Then, I cropped as needed. From there on, each image needed slightly different settings, so I will walk through each image separately.

My experience of photographing the dead trees along the waterline at Lake Gordon, felt far more dramatic when I was there, so my intent was to impart that same dramatic feeling through post processing. Below is the original, raw capture.

I made the following “global” changes using the Basic, Effects, and Details panels:

  • Increased the Temperature value to add warmth to the image.
  • Set new white and black points to extend the dynamic range of the original “flat” photograph.
  • Increase Clarity to exaggerate edge contrast in the midtones.
  • Increased the Dehaze value, however this pushed some of the shadow areas too dark, so I returned to the Basic panel to refine the black point.
  • Increased the amount of  Luminance and Color Noise Reduction in the Details panel.

Moving to the local adjustment tools, I started by adding three separate Graduated Filters:

  • The first one (starting in  the upper left, and reaching almost into the center of the photo), decreases exposure and shifts the Temperature towards yellow.
  • The second one (starting in the lower left and moving slightly into the image), “burns” the edge by lowering the Exposure value.
  • And infamy, the last one (starting at the bottom and moving upwards towards the center pf the photograph), adds Contrast and lightens Highlights (helping to separate the tree trunks from the background).

Finally, I selected the Adjustment Brush and made several small local adjustments:

  • The first one decreases the Exposure to darken the top left corner.
  • The second emphasizes the rays of light using Dehaze and Contrast.
  • The third increases Exposure the shadows in the tree area on the right.
  • And the fourth and final one shifts the temperature slider towards yellow in the center of the photograph.

When photographing the second location, I was impressed by the patterns made by the water flowing over the  sandbar. At the time, there was a bird singing nearby, and I remember wondering what the bird’s audio waves would look like if we could see them in the water. Regardless, my goal was to  accentuate the waves and patterns in Lightroom.The original raw capture below, was admittedly underexposed .

After applying Lens Corrections, cropping, and setting new black and white points, I  decreased the Highlights (to retain detail in the sand), add a bit of Dehaze, and decreased Saturation. I find that when using Dehaze on an image such as this one (when I’m using it more “creatively” and not necessarily to remove atmospheric haze), the image becomes overly saturated so I tend to lower the Saturation – but of course it’s a personal choice.

Then, I added two local adjustments using the Adjustment Brush:

  • The first darkens the  top right area of the water by decreasing Exposure.
  • The second adds additional Dehaze to the sandbar.

I then opened the file into Photoshop (16-bit, Adobe RGB, PSD file at 300 PPI). Using a combination of the Healing Brush and the Clone Stamp tool, I proceeded to remove the distracting flecks of sand as well as the plant in the lower right of the image.

Before and after retouching the sand in Photoshop.

I prefer to work with the Healing Brush as it’s typically faster when removing small elements. However if  the edges of the “healed” area soften the grain/noise pattern in the image (or make it “mushy”), I’ll switch to the Clone Stamp tool (even though in some instances it may take longer to match the colors/tone in the photograph).

The third photograph was taken from the passenger seat of a car. While I know that this isn’t optimal, if we stopped every time we saw a opportunity for a photograph, we would never have made it to our final destination! In this image, I wanted to accentuate the clouds over the mountains, the sunlight on the trees and, and mooo-ve a cow to higher ground. Below is the the original, raw capture.

After using the Lens Correction panel to remove distortions, cropping, and setting black and white points, I adjusted the White Balance – increasing the Temperature and decreasing the Tint sliders to remove the colder, blue cast. Then, I decreased the Highlights (to bring back detail in the clouds) and increased the Shadows (to reveal details in the trees). I refined the midtones by decreasing Exposure and increasing Contrast and added a slight increase in Clarity, while decreasing Saturation.

Then, I added two local adjustments:

  • Using the Adjustment Brush with an increased Exposure value, I lightened the front view of the trees.
  • I also used the graduated filter over the mountains and clouds  (set to increase Dehaze and reduce Saturation), however this adjustment also amplified the reflection from the car window (above the mountain –  center frame).

In Photoshop, I copied, pasted, and repositioned a “good” area of cloud to cover the reflection and used a Curves Adjustment layer to match the tonal values of the surrounding clouds (to restrict the effects of the Curves Adjustment Layer, I selected it and chose Layer > Create Clipping Mask). I then removed the distracting fence posts and, because the lonely cow at the bottom of the image was so close to the edge, I repositioned it a bit higher in the frame.

Please check out my additional images from Tasmania, on Behance, as well as my Portfolio page, in an Adobe Spark.

5:09 AM Permalink
September 5, 2017

Setting Custom Develop Defaults in Lightroom Classic

(JK: Updated  12-2017)

To change Lightroom’s default processing setting to apply Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration when importing images, use the following steps:

1) Select a raw file taken with your camera and remove any settings by clicking the Reset button in the lower right of the Develop Module.

2) In the Lens Correction panel, check both the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration options.

Note: changes are not limited to Lens Correction. You could, for example, change the default Profile used in the Camera Calibration panel or the amount of Noise Reduction applied in the Details panel – just remember that these settings will be applied to ALL future imported images from this camera.

3) Choose Develop > Set Default Settings > Update to Current Settings. Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not Undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Once the defaults are changed, any images taken with that camera model will automatically have the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration settings applied when the are imported into Lightroom (any images that are already in the catalog remain as they were). Because you are simply “Enabling” Profile Corrections, if you change lenses, Lightroom will automatically look for and apply the appropriate lens correction profile based on the EXIF data in the photo. Note:  For the small number of images that I don’t want to apply these setting to, I can easily disable (uncheck) the Lens Correction options or create a preset to apply both options in one click. 

Five Additional Tips:

1) If you are using multiple camera models, you will need to customize the default settings for each model (by following the above steps for each camera model).

2) It is also possible to save different setting for each camera based on serial number and ISO settings (Preferences > Presets). This can be useful when using custom camera profiles and/or customizing Noise Reduction options, for example.

3) If you import 1000 images but will only end up using 10 of them, applying these lens corrections to every file that you import will increase the amount of time it takes to render previews (how much time depends on your system, file size etc.). If you notice a significant decrease in performance,  you might prefer to create a preset to apply lens corrections, and apply it to only your best images.

4) Option (Mac) | Alt  (Win) toggles the Reset button to Set Default (in the Develop module).

5) Customizing the default settings in either Lightroom or Adobe Camera Raw, defines the settings for both products.

5:22 AM Permalink
April 3, 2017

Lightroom Classic – Shortcuts and Quick Reference Guide (PDF)!

Although I really appreciate that you can search my blog for Lightroom tips and shortcuts, several customers have requested that I create a single, condensed document that contains the Lightroom CC shortcuts that I use most often. So, click here to view/download the document.

The PDF file is 20+ pages long, and still doesn’t contain every shortcut… If you run across any mistakes/typos, please let me know and I’ll update the document.

And, if you’re looking for more information about my Lightroom workflow, be sure to check out my book Passenger Seat: Creating a Photographic Project from Conception through Execution in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom”.

Have a great week!

5:01 AM Permalink
March 23, 2017

Sync and Reposition Local Adjustments Between Images in Lightroom CC

Lightroom’s ability to sync local adjustments between images can help increase your productivity when workignwith several, similar images. This video (Hidden Gems in Lightroom CC), will show you how.  (The link above should take you directly to the portion of the demo that covers syncing local adjustments from 6:15 – 7:20).

Note: if it’s easier, you can use the Copy… button (located at the bottom of the left panels in the Develop module) to copy Local Adjustments. Then select a different image, and paste those adjustments. It just depends on your workflow.

4:52 AM Permalink
February 23, 2017

Quick Develop in Lightroom CC

When you need to make really subtle refinements using Quick Develop in Lightroom, Shift -click on any of the icons to cut the default amount of change applied in half.
Here are the default values for the single and double arrow icons (adding the shift key would cut these in half):

• Exposure 1/3 stop / 1 stop

• Contrast 5 and 20

• Highlights 5 and 20

• Shadows 5 and 20

• Whites 5 and 20

• Blacks 5 and 20

• Clarity 5 and 20

• Vibrance 5 and 20

• Holding down the Option (Mac) / Alt (Win) key toggles the Clarity option to Sharpen and the Vibrance to Saturation (which also make changes in increments of 5 and 20).

• The Temperature and Tint sliders are dependent on the file format. When working with JPEG files, you guessed it, the changes are in increments of 5 and 20.For raw images, the increments for Temperature and tint are also 5 and 20. However in this case they are being calculated in relative percentage terms. (Camera raw translates the relative percentage amount to the absolute temperature and tint value using curve functions – both are quadratic and perhaps not as obvious!)

5:24 AM Permalink
February 12, 2016

Customizing the Default Setting for ACR and Lightroom

I have customized my default processing settings for Lightroom in order to apply both Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration on import. To do this, I selected a raw image, moved to the Develop module, and clicked the Reset button to remove any previous edits made to the file. Then, I checked both the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration options.

02_08_Lens Correction1

To save the settings, choose Develop > Set Default Settings > Update to Current Settings.

Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Once the defaults are changed, any images taken with that camera model will automatically have the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration settings applied when they are imported into Lightroom (any images that are already in the catalog remain as they were). Because you are simply enabling Profile Corrections, if you change lenses, Lightroom will automatically look for and apply the appropriate lens correction profile based on the EXIF data in the photo.

If you are using multiple camera models, you will need to customize the default settings for each one (by taking a raw file from each camera model into the Develop module and changing and saving the settings). You can even save out different settings for each camera based on ISO settings and serial number using Preferences > Presets > Make defaults specific to camera serial number and/or Make defaults specific to camera ISO setting.  This can be very useful when using custom camera profiles and/or changing Noise Reduction options for example.

02_08_Prefs

Personally, I like automating the application of Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration to my images. However, there are some drawbacks. First, because I have told Lightroom to render Lens Corrections on every image I import, if I import 1,000 images but end up using only 100 of them,  adding the Lens Correction to all of the “unused” files may add additional rendering time for previews (how much time depends on your system, file size etc.). If you notice a slowdown in your workflow, you may prefer to create a Lens Correction preset and apply it just to your best images. In addition, if you have lenses that you don’t want corrected, you would have to remove the settings. It’s really up to you and how you prefer to work.

Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) changes the Reset button to Set Default and displays the Set Default Settings dialog.

Finally, you should know that when you choose to customize the default settings  in either Lightroom or Adobe Camera Raw, those settings are saved for both products.

5:34 AM Permalink
October 5, 2015

Lightroom CC Updates Now Available!

Discover how to dramatically improve an image either by removing or adding haze to an entire photo, or to specific regions using the local adjustment tools. Note: this technology is also available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC.

This update also includes support for new cameras and lens profiles, as well as assorted bug fixes (click here to see the entire list).

Updated 11-17-2015 to remove Import videos. The following are now current with Lightroom 6 and CC.

02. Lightroom –  Importing Images From a Camera Card

03. Lightroom –  Importing Photos from your Computer into Lightroom

6:53 AM Permalink
August 6, 2015

Relative vs. Absolute Adjustments to Images in Lightroom

In this episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost demonstrates the differences between making “absolute” adjustments to photographs using the Develop module in Lightroom verses “relative” adjustments using the Quick Develop panel in the Library module.

5:06 AM Permalink
June 22, 2015

Lightroom CC –  Adding Vignette and Grain Effects

In this video, you’ll learn how to add vignettes and simulate traditional film grain effects in Lightroom.

5:35 AM Permalink
June 19, 2015

Lightroom CC – Creating and Saving Presets in the Develop Module

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how to create and apply presets to multiple files in Lightroom.

5:37 AM Permalink
June 16, 2015

Dehaze in Camera Raw 9.1 for Photoshop CC and Lightroom CC

The new Dehaze control in Lightroom CC and Adobe Camera Raw 9.1 can help you to dramatically improve an image by removing haze. The Dehaze technology is based on a physical model of how light is transmitted, and it tries to estimate light that is lost due to absorption and scattering through the atmosphere. For the best results, you’ll want to set the white balance for the image before using Dehaze. Then, in the Effects panel, move the slider to the right – to easily remove the haze from the original scene. Move the slider to the left to add a creative haze effect.You can choose to make very subtle to very significant adjustments – if you’re pushing the slider to the extreme, you might want to refine the image using the Basic panel (increasing the shadow detail or refining the Vibrance slider) in order to achieve the exact look that you’re after. Check out the video below to see Dehaze in action.

Original image and with the addition of the Dehaze feature (slider set to +68).

Original image and with the addition of the Dehaze feature (slider set to +68).

Original image and with the subtraction of the Dehaze feature (slider set to -72)

Original image and with the subtraction of the Dehaze feature (slider set to -72)

When moving the slider, there is very little change in the highlight area (on the right side of the Histogram), while the shadows and lower portion of the histogram is clearly being changed. If you are concerned that the darker values in the image are being clipped to pure black, Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) -drag the slider to see the black point clipping visualization. When you see black areas appear in the image, you know that you’re starting to clip to pure black and can back off. In addition, Dehaze can be added locally by applying ACR as a Smart Filter in Photoshop.
Click here for more information about Camera Raw 9.1 including new camera and profile support.

2:00 AM Permalink
June 15, 2015

Synchronizing Photographs in Lightroom CC

In this quick tip, you’ll learn how to synchronize a folder so that Lightroom can add new photos to a previously imported folder.

5:13 AM Permalink
June 11, 2015

Quick Tip – Adding Cross Process Effects in Lightroom

In this quick tip, you’ll learn how to create a cross-process effect using the Split Tone panel in Lightroom.

5:10 AM Permalink
June 10, 2015

Lightroom CC – Adding Color Toning to Black and White Images

Discover an easy way to add color toning effects to black and white photographs in Lightroom.

5:07 AM Permalink
June 9, 2015

Quick Tip – Taking Advantage of Virtual Copies in Lightroom CC

Discover how virtual copies can help you create several different “looks” for the same image.

5:06 AM Permalink