Posts tagged "The Library Module"

December 19, 2013

Lightroom Files Can Contain Multiple Dates

Lightroom can display up to three different dates for a file in the Metadata panel: Date Time Original, Date Time Digitized and Date Time. Note: try setting the Metadata panel’s preset to EXIF to display them all. Here’s the explanation of when and why you might need these different dates:

• Date Time Original – This is the moment in time that is shown in the picture.  In other words, if you were at a new year’s eve party last year and took a picture at one minute before midnight, the Date Time Original of that picture is 12/31/2012 11:59 PM.

• Date Time Digitized – This is the moment in time at which the picture was committed to digital form.  For photos from a digital camera, this will always be identical to Date Time Original.  For film, it wouldn’t be.  For example, if you’d taken that new year’s eve picture on film, then waited exactly six months to scan (i.e., digitize) the film the Date Time Original would still be 12/31/2012 11:59 PM, but the Date Time Digitized would be 6/30/2013 11:59 PM.

• Date Time – This is the file creation date.  Again, for a picture from a digital camera that you haven’t mucked with, this will be identical to the previous two fields.  But if you generate a new file from the picture (using covert to DNG, as in your example, or via other means such as creating a PSD by editing in Photoshop) then this field will show the date on which the new file was created.  In other words, if you edited your new year’s eve picture in Photoshop at noon today, generating a new PSD in the process, the Date Time for the new file would be today’s date 12pm.

For most ordinary people shooting with a digital camera, the only field they care about is Date Time Original, and the only reason to ever edit it is if the clock on their camera was set incorrectly for some reason when they took the picture.  For example, if you’d traveled from California to New York for that new year’s party, and forgot to adjust your camera’s clock to account for the time zone change, then that picture you took would show a Date Time Original of 12/31/2012 8:59 PM.  Since you know that’s not correct, you would probably want to edit the capture time and use the “Shift by a set number of hours” option to move the Date Time Original field ahead by three hours.

Thank you so much Ben for this excellent explanation!

5:13 AM Permalink
December 18, 2013

How to Change Capture Time in Lightroom 5

In this episode of The Complete Picture (How to change Capture time in Lightroom 5), Julieanne demonstrates two ways to change the capture time of your images. The first enables you to offset a time zone change and the second supports a custom adjustment to align multiple cameras used to shoot one event but with different date/time settings in-camera.

5:11 AM Permalink
December 12, 2013

File Format View Options in Lightroom 5

In order to quickly view any image’s file type while in the Grid view in Lightroom, I customize my Library View Options (View > View Options), to Show Grid Extras: Expanded Cells. Then, I set the Expanded Cell Extras to display the File Base Name in the upper left and the File Extension below it. This helps avoid the truncation of the file extension when thumbnails are small and  file names are long.

20_ViewOpt

5:41 AM Permalink
November 5, 2013

Finding Files Based on Keywords in Lightroom

Although you can certainly use the Keyword List panel to search for images tagged with specific keywords, it might be easier to use the shortcut Command + F (Mac) | Control + F (Win) in the Library Module to enable the Text Filter. Choose Keywords from the drop-down list and type in the desired keyword. Note: the Keywords drop-down is persistent so the next time you use the shortcut, you will only be searching on keywords.

5:48 AM Permalink
November 4, 2013

Creating a Collection from a Folder in Lightroom

To quickly create a collection from a folder of images in Lightroom, drag the folder  from the Folders panel into the Collections panel. If you drag a folder that contains subfolders, it will create a single collection including all of the files in the parent folder and all subfolders.

 

12:45 AM Permalink
November 1, 2013

Removing Duplicate Files from Lightroom

I ran across this plug in (Duplicate Finder) and although I have not used it myself, I thought I would post the link because so many people ask me how to remove duplicate files from Lightroom. Please let me know what you think of the plug-in if you use it.

5:52 AM Permalink
October 24, 2013

Auto Import into Lightroom

Lightroom has the ability to automatically import files using a watched folder. To enable this feature, in the Library module, choose File > Auto Import and customize the Auto Import settings. This might be an alternative to tethered capture if your camera is not supported (although auto import can only copy files to a single, flat folder as its destination).

 

5:03 AM Permalink
October 22, 2013

Advanced Smart Collections In Lightroom 5

Did you know that you can have Lightroom automatically display all of the images in a catalog that are missing keywords or has an Unknown  Copyright Status? Or, that you can have Lightroom show you all of your best images in the past 90 days? If not, it’s time to explore Smart Collections! As you can see in the screen shots below, there are numerous settings that can help Lightroom create task-oriented Smart Collections of images to expedite your workflow.

16Keywordsa

16Copyright

16Best90

5:27 AM Permalink
October 17, 2013

Synchronizing Folders in Lightroom

I often download files into a folder, import them into Lightroom and then find that I have additional files to add to that folder. When this happens, I simply copy the additional files into that folder using the operating system. Then, in Lightroom, I Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) on the folder in the Folder panel and choose Synchronize Folder (or choose Library > Synchronize Folder). In the Synchronize folder dialog, you can choose to display the import dialog to add additional metadata or toggle it off and add any necessary metadata in the Library module.

 

5:26 AM Permalink
October 1, 2013

Re-linking Files and Folders in Lightroom

If files and/or folders have been moved  using the operating system (instead of from within Lightroom), Lightroom will lose the link to the file and display a warning icon (!) next to the missing image in the Grid view (as well as in the Histogram panel) or next to missing folder in the Folder panel.

10_MIssing

Clicking on the “!” icon will allow you to locate and re-link any files (Lightroom will prompt you to find the files that you moved. In the subsequent dialog, be sure to check the option to Find nearby missing photos if more than one image from the same folder is missing).

You can re-link folders that have been moved or renamed by Control (Mac) / right mouse -clicking on the folder name in the Folders panel and selecting Find Missing Folder.

To view all missing files in your library, you can also choose Library > Find All Missing Photos and then relink them.

4:46 AM Permalink
September 5, 2013

Using Lightroom with Two Monitors

I’m often asked if Lightroom’s panels can be moved to a secondary screen like you can do in Photoshop. And, while you can’t physically separate the panels in Lightroom and move them, Lightroom does have the option to use two monitors to display images. This video was recorded with a previous version of Lightroom but the information is still valid today. Click here to learn how to take advantage of using the different display options to compare images using multiple views, achieve a consistent look between images, and use two monitors in a sales environment.

 

5:17 AM Permalink
August 26, 2013

A New Preference when Importing into Lightroom 5

There is a new Preference in Lightroom to control whether or not Lightroom displays the files as they are being imported. Choosing Preferences > General > Import Options and checking “Select the ‘Current/Previous Import’ Collection During Import” tells Lightroom to display the images being imported (by revealing that collection in the Catalog Panel in the Library module). If you uncheck the preference, Lightroom will keep the focus on the last previously viewed images (prior to Import), avoiding any interruption by switching folders/collections.

 

5:04 AM Permalink
August 22, 2013

Video Tutorial – Share Images Online with Lightroom 5

In this video tutorial, (Sharing Images online with Lighroom 5), Julieanne will demonstrate the many ways that Lightroom can help you share your images including creating web galleries, automating photo sharing (via Publish Services), and  quickly sending images via email.

4:55 AM Permalink
August 19, 2013

DNG Verification in Lightroom 5

There is a new command in Lightroom 5 that will verify the integrity of any Adobe created DNG files (Library>Validate DNG Files). If it finds any invalid DNG files, they will automatically be placed in a special collection.

This validation is helpful when we want to check to make sure that files haven’t been corrupted after copying then from one drive to another. It can also be helpful if we want to know with certainty if anything has changed in the original source image. If something has changed, then we know that something has gone wrong and it can (hopefully) be solved before more damage is done (like additional files are copied or changed).

It’s important to note that the data that Lightroom is verifying is the “original source image” – which, in a DNG file is never supposed to change. Lightroom is checking this information independently of the other information (that may have changed) in the file.

Here is a little more detail (and please understand that this is a bit of an oversimplification): the DNG file contains many different “kinds” of information. It’s helpful to imagine that the DNG file is really more like a file cabinet and each different “kind” of information is stored in a different folder in that cabinet. This enables certain segments of the file (one folder) to be altered independently of another segment (or folder).

For example, if you add IPTC data to a DNG file (by adding keywords, copyright etc.), the data in the IPTC folder changes, but the source image data (which is stored in another folder), remains unchanged. Even when you make edits to a DNG file in Lightroom’s Develop module (or Photoshop’s Camera Raw plug-in), all of the changes are made to the DNG file (as a set of instructions) and are stored in a separate folder so as not to change the original source image data. It’s then up to the software – PS or LR to take the original source data and then apply the set of instructions (from the other folder) and display the results on screen so that it “appears” as if the changes have been made when, in fact, the original source information has not been touched. Of course the benefit of not touching the original is that the entire workflow is then non-destructive: the changes can be modified or removed at any time without changing the original source data.

Here we can see that there are many types of data in a DNG file that can be changed. But the Source Image data should remain untouched.

Here we can see that there are many types of data in a DNG file that can be changed including EXIF, IPTC, AUX, RDF etc.). However, the Source Image Data should remain unchanged – and that is what the DNG verification feature validates.

So, it’s the best of both worlds, you can now validate an Adobe DNG file to confirm that the source image data has not changed, yet still make changes to other information in the file in order to add metadata and enhance the image.

Note: Only DNG files created by Adobe software can be validated (camera-‐created DNGs cannot be validated because they do not contain the necessary checksum).

For more information, be sure to check out Peter Krogh’s in depth explanation.

5:43 AM Permalink
July 19, 2013

Hierarchical Keywords in Lightroom 5

Hierarchical keywords are written in a much more logical (and visually obvious) manner in Lightroom 5.

For example if we have the parent keyword “Flower” and want to add the child keyword “Rose” it would be represented as:

Flower > Rose

In addition, it can also be written as:

Rose < Flower

They both result in the same keywords applied, with Flower as the parent and Rose as the child  (notice that the “>” is changing direction between the two examples).

5:07 AM Permalink