Posts tagged "Type"

October 15, 2015

Point vs. Paragraph Type in Photoshop

Clicking with the Type tool will create Point Type (or headline type), where lines of type have to be manually broken to wrap. To create Paragraph Type, (type that flows within a bounding box) click and drag with the Type tool to draw the bounding box.  Or, Option -click  (Mac) / Alt -click (Win) in the image area with the Type tool to display the Paragraph Text size dialog box and numerically enter the height and width of the bounding area.

5:06 AM Permalink
October 14, 2015

Previewing Type in Photoshop

While type in the image is selected, Command (Mac) / Control (Win) + H will hide the selected “reversed out” type enabling a more accurate preview of the type.

5:02 AM Permalink
October 13, 2015

Selecting Type in Photoshop

Clicking the cursor within a type block will auto-select the Type layer on the Layers panel. Shift-click with the Type tool to create a new Type layer (in case you’re close to another type block and Photoshop tries to auto-select it). Double clicking on the “T” icon on the Layers panel will select all of the type on the layer.

5:02 AM Permalink
October 12, 2015

Entering Text in Photoshop

When entering text, you’re in a semi-modal state in Photoshop – similar to Free Transform. However, the return or enter key will break the text to the next line – not commit to it (like it would apply the transformation). In order to apply (or commit the text) use Command + return (Mac) / Control (Win) + enter.

5:02 AM Permalink
September 15, 2015

Clipping an Image Inside Type in Photoshop

Discover how easy it is to clip a photograph within type with this free video (Clipping an image inside type in Photoshop), from!

09_10_clip type

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July 23, 2015

Lightroom CC – Printing a Contact Sheet of Photographs

Learn how to use the Print module in Lightroom to create a quick contact sheet.

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July 17, 2015

Quick Tip – Setting Text Over a Background Image in Lightroom.

In this quick tip, you’ll learn how to make text stand out from a background photo using the Book module in Lightroom.

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July 16, 2015

Lightroom CC – Working with Text in The Book Module

Learn the most efficient way to work with type in this third part of a three-part series on the Book module in Lightroom.

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January 13, 2015

Accessing Special Type Characters in Photoshop

As a follow up to Monday’s blog – here are a few shortcuts for accessing special characters within Photoshop (assuming that the font that you have selected contains those characters!).

Bullet (•) – Option + 8 (Mac) | Alt + 7 (Win)

Cent (¢) – Option + 4 (Mac) | Alt + 155 (Win)

Copyright (©) – Option + G (Mac) | Alt + 0169 (Win)

Degree (°) – Option + Shift + 8 (Mac) | Alt + 248 (Win)

Ellipsis (…) – Option + Semi-colon (Mac) | Alt + 0133 (Win)

En dash (–) – Option + dash (Mac) | Alt + 0150

Em dash (—) – Option + Shift + dash  (Mac) | Alt + 0151

Registered Trademark (®) – Option +R (Mac) | Alt + 0174 (Win)

Trademark (™) – Option + 2 (Mac) |  Alt + 0153

5:44 AM Permalink
January 12, 2015

Julieanne’s Favorite Type Shortcuts in Photoshop CC 2014

Here is a list of my favorite shortcuts for working with Type in Photoshop:

1) Basic Formatting Shortcuts:
• Command + Shift + < or > (Mac) | Control  + Shift + < or > (Win) increases/decreases point size by 1.
• Command + Option + Shift + < or > (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + < or > (Win) increases/decreases point size by 5.
• Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) left/right arrow key decreases/increases kerning (the amount of spacing between two characters).
• Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) left/right arrow key decreases/increases tracking (if greater than 2 letters are selected).
• Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) + up/down arrow increases/decreases leading (the amount of vertical space between lines in a paragraph).
• Command + Option (Mac) | Control + Alt  (Win) + up/down arrow increases/decreases leading by 5.
• Option + Shift (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) Shift + up/down arrow increases/decreases the baseline shift by 1.
• Command + Option + Shift + A (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + A (Win) reverts back to Auto Leading.
• Command + Return (Mac) | Control + Enter (Win) commits the text (simply clicking return/enter will add a line break).
• Command + Shift + L/C/R (Mac) | Control + Shift + L/C/R (Win) aligns text Left/Center/Right (when using the Horizontal Type tool).
• Command + Shift + L/C/R (Mac) | Control + Shift + L/C/R (Win) aligns Top/Center/Bottom when using the Vertical Type tool.

2) Changing Font Style
If a font “family” (Myriad or Minion for example) has a font “style” (Bold or Italic for example), then the following keyboard shortcuts will change the Font Style. If the font doesn’t contain the style then “Faux” styling will be applied.
• Command  + Shift + B (Mac) / Control + Shift + B (Win) sets Bold.
• Command + Shift + I (Mac) / Control + Shift + I (Win) sets Italic.
• Command + Shift +  K (Mac) / Control + Shift +  K (Win) sets All Caps.
• Command + Shift +  H (Mac) / Control + Shift +  H (Win) sets Small Caps.

3) Selecting Type
• Shift + Left Arrow/Right Arrow selects 1 character left/right.
• Shift + Down Arrow/Up Arrow selects 1 line down/up.
• Command + Shift + Left/Right Arrow (Mac) | Control + Shift + Left/Right Arrow  (Win) selects 1 word left/right.
•  While the type (or a portion of the type) is selected, Command + H (Mac) | Control + H (Win) hides the selected “reversed out” type enabling a more accurate preview of the type (especially when selecting a color).
• Double click the “T” (Type Layer thumbnail) in the Layers panel to select all of the type on the Layer.
• Select multiple type layers at one time (using the Layers panel) to change attributes for multiple layers at once.

4) Resizing Type — When editing type, Command-drag  (Mac) | Control-drag  (Win) the anchor points (of the bounding box) to resize the type. Add the Shift key to constrain proportions.

5) Repositioning Type—Positioning the cursor slightly outside of the Type’s bounding box, temporarily toggles the icon to the Move tool. Drag to reposition the type in the image area without first having to commit to the type.

6) Adding a New Type Layer—Shift-click the Type tool in the image area to create a new type layer when close to another type block. (Adding the Shift key prevents Photoshop from auto selecting nearby text, which can be very helpful when a image contains several type layers in close proximity).

7) The Adobe Single vs Multi-Line Composer —The overall “look and feel” of justified text can be vastly improved by calculating the justification settings based on more than one line of text in a paragraph (as opposed to setting each line individually).  The next time you create a block of paragraph text in Photoshop, select the type and use the shortcut• Command + Option + Shift + T (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + T (Win) to toggle between the Adobe Single-line and Every-line Composer. The Adobe Every-line Composer will almost always produce tighter, better-looking paragraphs with more consistent spacing.

8) Paragraph Formatting Shortcuts
• Command + Option + Shift + H (Mac) / Control + Alt + Shift + H (Win) toggles paragraph hyphenation on/off.
• When creating Paragraph (or “Area”) type, Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) in the image area to set the width and height of the paragraph type bounding box.
• Command + Shift + J (Mac) | Control  + Shift + J (Win) will justify the paragraph and left justify the last line.
• Command + Shift + F (Mac) | Control  + Shift + F (Win) will justify the paragraph AND justify the last line.

9) Warping Type Layers — To warp multiple layers of text as a single unit, select the layers and convert them into a single Smart Object. Then, add the warp. (Edit > Transform > Warp or Type > Warp Text)

10) Changing the Color of Type
• Option + Delete (Mac) | Alt  + Backspace (Win) fills any selected type with the foreground color.
• Command + Delete (Mac) | Control + Backspace (Win) fills any selected type with the background color.
Note: If the type layer is selected, but no individual letters within the text block are selected (there isn’t any text insertion point in the text), these shortcuts will change the color of all of the type on a layer.

11) Previewing Fonts
Now that Photoshop displays live font previews in the image area, you might want to turn off the preview in the font menu (allowing you to see more of your image, and less of the menu). Choose  Type > Font Preview Size > None to turn off (or make smaller) the font preview menu.

The video below has more information on Instant Font Preview, Font Search and Typekit Features in Photoshop CC:

And here is more information on Typekit Font Matching in Photoshop CC

And a blog post about System Font Matching and Sub Pixel Rendering in Photoshop CC

What to know how to set default Type Styles in Photoshop CC? Watch the video below.

Learn more about Paragraph and Character Styles in the following Photoshop video:

I’m sure that there are more shortcuts that you find useful. If so, please share!

5:15 AM Permalink
August 7, 2014

19/50 – Font Search, Instant Type Preview and Typkit Features in Photoshop CC

The 2014 Release of Photoshop CC added additional typographic features including font search, instant font preview and integration with Typekit better than ever. Check out these features and more in the video below.

5:15 AM Permalink
August 6, 2014

18/50 – Typekit Font Matching in Photoshop CC

If you work with type in Photoshop, then chances are that at some point in your career, you’ve tried to open a document that was handed off to you, only to find that you didn’t have the same fonts installed as the creator of the document. Let’s take a look at how Photoshop CC has improved this workflow.
In previous versions of Photoshop, when opening a document that utilized fonts that are not installed on the current system, Photoshop notified you that there were missing fonts, but that was all. Now, when you open a document and there are missing fonts, Photoshop will look for an exact match using Typekit. If it finds a match, it asks you if you want to replace it. If it doesn’t find a match, Typekit will display your default font as well as other fonts that are being used in the document so that you can choose an acceptable replacement.

Note, for this to work, TypeKit “Font Sync” must be turned on (CC desktop App > Preferences > Fonts > Typekit = On)

4:53 AM Permalink
August 5, 2014

17/50 – System Font Matching and Sub Pixel Rendering in Photoshop CC

In order to render type in Photoshop which will match the operating system, Photoshop CC introduced new anti-aliasing options. Selecting the Type tool and choosing the font matching option (MAC or MAC LCD on Macintosh, Windows or Windows LCD on Windows) from the Options bar (or the application menu: Type > Anti-Alias), enables text rendered in Photoshop to look the same as the browsers on their respective operating systems. However, selecting these options does give up fonts looking the same cross platform, so don’t use the system font matching options if you’re doing print work and want cross platform compatibility.
In addition, Photoshop CC does sub pixel rendering on the system and the gamma value for text is automatically set for new system options.

5:49 AM Permalink
August 4, 2014

16/50 – Setting Default Type Styles in Photoshop CC

In Photoshop CS6, the engineering team added the ability to create Type styles to make working with text in Photoshop much more efficient. In Photoshop CC, they added additional functionality including the ability to set default Type styles. This video explains the details:

I thought it might be helpful to include a few additional notes to clarify what will happen (the default behavior) when working with default type styles in different scenarios:

• If you choose “Save Default Type Styles” from the Type menu, it will REPLACE your existing default type styles if they exist, or create them if they do not.

• After defining default type styles, every time you create a new document, those default type styles will be automatically loaded into the new document.

• If you open an existing document without any defined styles, Photoshop will automatically load the default type styles.

• If you open an existing document that HAS type styles defined, Photoshop will NOT load the default set. (You can choose to load them manually – see next bullet.)

• If you choose “Load Default Type Styles”, it will APPEND the default styles to any type styles already defined in the document. However, if there is a type style with the same name, it does not load that default type style.

• After loading the default styles in a document, they are saved with the document. If you later change the default styles, this will not update the styles in previous documents.

• If you need different sets of type styles for different projects/clients, you will need to define those type style sets in separate Photoshop files and then load the appropriate set each time you begin work for that project/client.

If you’re new to Type Styles, this video will quickly get you up to speed:

5:46 AM Permalink
January 29, 2014

Centering Text on the Spine of a Book in Lightroom

When creating a book in Lightroom, I prefer to have text that appears on the spine to be vertically centered. To have Lightroom automate this process, enter your text, then in the Type panel, click the Vertical Align Center icon. This is much easier than trying to use the Padding options in the Cell panel. 


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