Posts tagged "Upright"

July 25, 2014

10/50 – Sync Upright’s Numeric Transforms in Camera Raw

Often I have found that I want to apply perspective correction to multiple files at once using the Upright feature in Camera Raw. But depending on the results I want to achieve, it’s best to know that there are two different ways of accomplishing this. Note: For both methods, it is recommended that you first enable Lens Profile Corrections and  Remove Chromatic Aberration using the Lens Corrections panel in Camera Raw.

METHOD ONE  - in the first situation, you might have a series of unrelated images that all need to have their own set of perspective corrections made to them. In this case, the easiest way to apply Upright would be to:

• Select all of the desired files in Camera Raw. Then in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel (where the Upright controls are) click the desired Upright mode (Auto, Level, Vertical, or Full) in order to apply the perspective correction to all selected files.

Here all of the images are selected, then the Upright mode is applied.

Here all of the images are selected in the filmstrip, then the Upright mode is applied.

• With this method, each image is analyzed individually and the perspective corrected.

Note: if you prefer not to select all of the files first (or have additional settings in other panels that you want to synchronize to multiple selected images), you can select the first file and apply the desired changes including the Upright mode. Then, add the other images to your selection and click the Synchronize button. In the Synchronize dialog, check the settings you want, plus Transform. And, if you do this often, you may want to consider creating a preset to apply an Upright transformation mode.

METHOD TWO – in the second situation, you might have a series of related images – such as a sequence of bracketed exposures or a set of time lapse images for which you need the same exact numeric perspective corrections made to each image. In this scenario, you don’t want to run the upright analysis on each individual image because Upright is likely to return a slightly different result on each of the images in the selection. Instead, what you want to do is have the upright analysis be performed on one of the images, and then have the result of that analysis (the numeric transformation) synchronized across the other images in the set.

In order to do this,  select the first image of the series (in this case one of several exposures necessary to create a single HDR image) and apply the desired Upright transformation option.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Then, add the additional images to your selection and, in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel, click the Sync Results hyperlink.

All images in the Filmstrip are selected and the becomes available.

With all of the images in the series selected in the filmstrip, the Sync Results hyperlink becomes available..

With multiple images selected, Camera Raw will copy Upright’s numerical transformations from the primary image to the other selected images.

5:24 AM Permalink
July 24, 2014

9/50 – Upright Perspective Corrections in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

In the video below, discover how to use Camera Raw’s Upright modes to fix common problems in photographs such as tilted horizons and converging verticals in buildings.

Shortcut: in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual subpanel, press Control-Tab to cycle through the Upright options from left to right. Add the Shift key to move from right to left.

5:22 AM Permalink
October 9, 2013

Video Tutorial – Adobe Camera Raw 8.2 in Photoshop CC (v14.1)

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Adobe Camera Raw 8.2 in Photoshop CC (v14.1)), Julieanne takes a close look at the feature enhancements and refinements made to the Crop tool, workflow settings, and batch saving capabilities in Adobe Camera Raw.  In addition she also covers improvements made to the Spot Removal Tool, Noise Reduction, Local Adjustment Brush, and Histogram.

Note: For more information about the Features in Camera Raw 8.0 (PSCC V14), including the new Upright perspective correction, Radial Filter, and Spot Removal  features please see this video “Adobe Photoshop CC: Favorite Features for Photographers”.

7:15 AM Permalink
October 2, 2013

Sync Upright’s Numeric Transforms in Camera Raw

Often I have found that I want to apply perspective correction to multiple files at once using the Upright feature in Camera Raw. But depending on the results I want to achieve, it’s best to know that there are two different ways of accomplishing this. Note: For both methods, it is recommended that you first enable Lens Profile Corrections and  Remove Chromatic Aberration using the Lens Corrections panel in Camera Raw.

METHOD ONE  - in the first situation, you might have a series of unrelated images that all need to have their own set of perspective corrections made to them. In this case, the easiest way to apply Upright would be to:

• Select all of the desired files in Camera Raw. Then in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel (where the Upright controls are) click the desired Upright mode (Auto, Level, Vertical, or Full) in order to apply the perspective correction to all selected files.

Here all of the images are selected, then the Upright mode is applied.

Here all of the images are selected in the filmstrip, then the Upright mode is applied.

• With this method, each image is analyzed individually and the perspective corrected.

Note: if you prefer not to select all of the files first (or have additional settings in other panels that you want to synchronize to multiple selected images), you can select the first file and apply the desired changes including the Upright mode. Then, add the other images to your selection and click the Synchronize button. In the Synchronize dialog, check the settings you want, plus Transform. And, if you do this often, you may want to consider creating a preset to apply an Upright transformation mode.

METHOD TWO – in the second situation, you might have a series of related images – such as a sequence of bracketed exposures or a set of time lapse images for which you need the same exact numeric perspective corrections made to each image. In this scenario, you don’t want to run the upright analysis on each individual image because Upright is likely to return a slightly different result on each of the images in the selection. Instead, what you want to do is have the upright analysis be performed on one of the images, and then have the result of that analysis (the numeric transformation) synchronized across the other images in the set.

In order to do this,  select the first image of the series (in this case one of several exposures necessary to create a single HDR image) and apply the desired Upright transformation option.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Then, add the additional images to your selection and, in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel, click the Sync Results hyperlink.

All images in the Filmstrip are selected and the becomes available.

With all of the images in the series selected in the filmstrip, the Sync Results hyperlink becomes available..

With multiple images selected, Camera Raw will copy Upright’s numerical transformations from the primary image to the other selected images.

5:02 AM Permalink
July 23, 2013

Video Tutorial – Create Stunning Images in LIghtroom 5

In this video tutorial (Create Stunning Images), Julieanne demonstrates how to create the highest quality photographs by removing lens distortion, cropping, correcting perspective, and making color and tonal corrections in Lightroom’s Develop module.

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5:13 AM Permalink
June 24, 2013

Upright Perspective Corrections in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

In the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual subpanel, press Control-Tab to cycle through the Upright options from left to right. Add the Shift key to move from right to left.

 

5:30 AM Permalink
June 11, 2013

Video Tutorials – Correcting Perspective using Upright in Lightroom 5

In this video tutorial (Correcting Perspective using Upright in Lightroom 5), Julieanne demonstrates how to automatically fix common problems such as tilted horizons as well as converging verticals in buildings using Lightroom’s Upright controls for perspective correction.

7:29 AM Permalink
May 7, 2013

Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers

As many of you  know, this morning Adobe announced Photoshop CC. Although it’s not yet shipping, here is a video of my favorite features that will be available soon!

In this episode (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), Julieanne Kost will demonstrate her top 5 favorite features in Photoshop CC including the new Upright perspective correction, Radial Filter, and Spot Removal  features in Adobe Camera Raw 8, Image Upsampling and Smart Sharpening, Live Shapes for Rounded Rectangles, and Camera Shake Reduction.

If you own Photoshop CS6 and are moving to Photoshop CC, you might also want to watch this video (Julieanne’s Top 5 Features for Photographers in Photoshop 13.1 ), to learn about the new features that were added to Photoshop 13.1 (released back in December exclusively for Creative Cloud Members).

In addition, here is a great article with insights about Breaking from Tradition written by Maria Yap, Sr. Director of Product Management at Adobe.

And if you have questions, Jeff Tranberry provides answers in this FAQ – for Photoshop and Lightroom Customers.

And the Creative Cloud FAQ.

And information about Lightroom and Creative Cloud.

6:30 AM Permalink
May 2, 2013

Additional Lens Correction Features in Lightroom

Here are three more interesting Upright options/features:

1) When you apply an Upright mode to a file to correct perspective, Lightroom caches that information (there are a number of reasons for this including but not limited to speed, consistency, future versioning, etc.). This means that if you apply an Upright mode and then decide to check “Enable Profile Correction” (simply because you forgot to do this first), you will want to click the “Reanalyze” option. This will tell upright to forget about those stored corrections, redo its analysis of the image, and compute a new correction.

2) Upright will generally work better on raw files compared to non-raw files, because it can take advantage of more reliable metadata (e.g., focal length).

3) Rotated crops and manual perspective corrections on existing images will usually interfere with automated Upright corrections. For this reason, applying any of the Upright corrections will reset the crop and manual perspective adjustments (Horizontal, Vertical, Rotate, Scale, and Aspect controls). Resetting the crop has the benefit of showing the user the maximum amount of image area remaining after an Upright adjustment (of course the crop can then be re-adjusted). Resetting the manual options will yield a better correction. However, in case you have a workflow that requires maintaining manual perspective corrections, Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) when choosing an Upright mode will preserve those manual settings.

5:24 AM Permalink
April 30, 2013

How to Synchronize Upright Lens Corrections in Lightroom

Often I have found that I want to apply perspective correction to multiple files at once using the Upright feature in Lightroom 5. But depending on the results I want to achieve, it’s best to know that there are two different ways of accomplishing this.

In the first situation, you might have a series of unrelated images that all need to have their own set of perspective corrections made to them. In this case, the easiest way to apply Upright would be to:

• Select all of the desired files in the Develop Module.

• Enable the Auto Sync feature (by toggling the switch to the left of the Sync… button).

•In the Lens Correction Basic panel, click the desired Upright mode (Auto, Level, Vertical, or Full) in order to apply the perspective correction to all selected files

With this method, each image is analyzed individually and the perspective corrected.

If you prefer not to use Auto Sync, you can select the first file and apply the desired Upright mode. Then, use the shortcut Command + C (Mac) | Control + C (Win) and check Upright Mode. Note: if the Upright Mode option is grayed out, that’s because the Upright transformations option is checked. Uncheck Upright Transformation and check Upright Mode instead. Then, select the other files to which you want the perspective correction applied and press Command + V (Mac) | Control + V (Win) to paste the corrections.

Or, if this is something you do all of the time, you can create a preset by selecting Develop > New Preset and enabling the “Upright Mode” option. 

In the second situation, you might have a series of related images – such as a sequence of bracketed exposures or a set of time lapse images for which you need the same exact numeric perspective corrections made to each image. In this scenario, you don’t want to run the upright analysis on each individual image because, due to robustness issues, Upright is very likely to return a slightly different result on each of the images in the selection. Instead, what you really want to do is have the upright analysis be performed on one of the images, and then have the result of that analysis (the numeric transformation) copied and applied  to the other images in the set. In order to do this,  copy the settings with Command + C (Mac) | Control + C (Win) and in the Copy Setting dialog, choose “Upright Transforms”. Then, select the other files that you want the perspective correction applied to and choose Command + V (Mac) | Control + V (Win) to paste the corrections.

You could choose to create a preset by selecting Develop > New Preset and selecting the “Upright Transforms” option but I’m not sure that this preset would be as useful (when applied to additional images in the future)  because the numeric values are locked into it.

4:56 AM Permalink
April 15, 2013

Julieanne’s favorite features in the Lightroom 5 Beta

Here are links to my top 3 features in the Lightroom 5 Beta!

Upright (Automatic perspective correction) - Discover how to automatically fix common problems such as tilted horizons as well as converging verticals in buildings using Lightroom’s new Upright controls for perspective correction.

The Advanced Healing Brush - Discover the new enhancements to Lightroom’s advanced Healing Brush including the ability to heal and clone non-circular brush spots as well as remove easy to miss sensor dust using the new Visualization slider.

The Radial Filter - Learn how easy it is to apply any and all of Lightroom’s existing local adjustments including dodging and burning, adding vignettes, selectively sharpening and more to one or more completely customizable, nondestructive, circular Radial filters – anywhere in  your image.

For additional information, check out the Lightroom Journal and the photoshop.com blog.

12:00 PM Permalink