I had the pleasure of talking with Tom and Ray on Car Talk once…

For all of my adult life, Tom and Ray Magliozzi were my Saturday morning companions. Since I never had new cars, car repair was a constant part of my weekend activities and Tom and Ray helped me maintain perspective through broken knuckles, broken parts and broken hearts (actually, carburetors, but hearts sounds better, no?). I was fortunate enough to have been a caller on Car Talk, seeking advice from the sages.

Back in September of 2008, our 1998 Chevy Venture died a steamy death. A call to Click and Clack at Car Talk told me that the car could be repaired, and that I should look for a broken intake manifold gasket rather than a broken head gasket.

Taking up the challenge, I was able to dig down into the engine and finally see the broken gasket. Unfortunately, it was dark by then, and it snowed overnight and that was the last time I looked in there. Unfortunately for me, I got a call from Louis Cronin asking me to be on Stump the Chumps, but since I hadn’t actually completed the repair, I was not allowed to compete.

In August 2011, a car picker came by with a flatbed. He knocked on the door and offered me money for the dead car. I took it before he could change his mind, and he took it away. Imagine the cascade of mice, bees and wasps as he dragged it off the ground!

I took the liberty of recording my entire conversation with Click and Clack, and while the version that appeared on Car Talk back in 2008 was edited for time and sounds better than mine, it is interesting to listen to the entire conversation. While we have lost Tom, his infectious laugh and keen wit lives on in my and many, many other fan’s hearts.

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Use Powerpoint presentations in Adobe DPS

Many of my Enterprise customers have asked for a way to bring PowerPoint content to DPS. While InDesign provides a robust design platform for creating interactive DPS experiences, InDesign isn’t always readily accessible to a salesperson or sales management who need to deploy presentations to their tablet-enabled sales force. In addition, they often have many years of approved presentation content in PowerPoint that is readily available. In order to use that content in DPS, a design team would usually rebuild the content in InDesign or perhaps use a third party tool to export the presentation to HTML and then import it to DPS. With the release of R32.1 of Adobe DPS, Enterprise DPS customers can now export their PowerPoint presentations directly to their DPS accounts using a new PowerPoint add-in. Learn more at the DPS Export Add-in Help Page.

The add-in is available for Windows 7 and higher customers who use PowerPoint 2010 or 2013 in 32bit mode. There is no Macintosh version, as PowerPoint for Mac does not have a add-in architecture similar to Windows. You can download a localized version of the add-in from here.

The add-in supports most animations and even video. The add-in installs the desktop Content Viewer, too, so you don’t need InDesign to proof your presentation before publishing it to the Folio Producer. The ease with which a business user can convert their presentations to DPS is shocking, and I believe that customers will be delighted with the results.

I’ve recorded a short video showing the add-in in action. View it on Youtube.

The add-in supports many of the interactive features in PowerPoint. Below is a table of supported interactive items.

Category Subcategory Content ACV Support Status
Static Content Tables Insert Table Yes
Draw Table Yes
Excel SpreadSheet Yes
Images Picture Yes
Clip Art Yes
Screenshot Yes
Photo Album Yes
Illustations Shapes Yes
SmartArt Yes
Chart Yes
Text Text Box Yes
Header & Footer Yes
WordArt Yes
Date & Time Yes
Slide Number No
Object Yes
Symbols Equation Yes
Symbol Yes
Interactive Content Hyperlink Existing File No
Web Page Yes
Place in This Document First Slide Yes
Last Slide Yes
Next Slide Yes
Previous Slide Yes
Slide Titles Yes
Custom Shows No
Create New Document No
Email Address Yes
Notes:
Foliomaker does not support the hyperlinks in SmartArt graphic.
Action
(Mouse Click)
Hyperlink to: Next Slide Yes
Previous Slide Yes
First Slide Yes
Last Slide Yes
Last Slide Viewed No
End Show No
Custom Show No
Slide Yes
URL Yes
Other PowerPoint Presentation No
Other File No
Run Program No
Run Macro No
Object Action No
Play Sound No
Highlight Click No
Video Video from File Yes
Video from Web Site No
Clip Art Video (GIF) No
Audio Audio from File (.mp3) Yes
Clip Art Audio (.wav) Yes
Record Audio No
Animation -
Transitions - No

 

Below is a list of supported animations.

Animation type Desktop & iPad ACV Support Status
Entrance Effects Appear No
Box Yes
Circle Yes
Dissolve In Yes
Peek In Yes
Random Bars Yes
Strips No
Wheel No
Blinds Yes
Checkerboard Yes
Diamond Yes
Fly In Yes
Plus No
Split No
Wedge No
Wipe Yes
Expand Yes
Swivel Yes
Fade Yes
Zoom Yes
Basic Zoom Yes
Float Down Yes
Grow & Turn No
Spinner Yes
Center Revolve Yes
Float up Yes
Rise up Yes
Basic Swivel Yes
Bounce Yes
Curve Up Yes
Flip Yes
Pinwheel No
Whip Yes
Boomerang Yes
Credits Yes
Drop Yes
Float Yes
Spiral In Yes
Emphasis Effects Fill Color Yes
Grow/Shrink Yes
Spin No
Font Color Yes
Line Color Yes
Transparency No
Bold Flash Yes
Complementary Color Yes
Contrasing Color Yes
Desaturate Yes
Object Color Yes
Underline Yes
Brush Color Yes
Complementary Color 2 Yes
Darken Yes
Lighten Yes
Pulse Yes
Color Pulse Yes
Shimmer Yes
Grow With Color Yes
Teeter Yes
Blink Yes
Wave Yes
Bold Reveal No
Exit Effects Blinds No
Checkerboard No
Diamond Yes
Dissolve Out Yes
Peek Out Yes
Random Bars Yes
Strips No
Wheel No
Box No
Circle Yes
Disappear No
Fly Out Yes
Plus Yes
Split No
Wedge No
Wipe No
Contract Yes
Swivel No
Fade Yes
Zoom Yes
Basic Zoom No
Float Down Yes
Shrink & Turn Yes
Spinner Yes
Center Revolve No
Float Up Yes
Sink Down Yes
Basic Swivel No
Bounce Yes
Curve Down Yes
Flip Yes
Pinwheel Yes
Whip Yes
Boomerang Yes
Credits Yes
Drop Yes
Float No
Spiral Out Yes
Motion Paths 4 Point Star Yes
6 Point star Yes
Circle Yes
Diamond Yes
Football Yes
Hexagon Yes
Parallelogram Yes
Right Triangle Yes
Teardrop Yes
5 Point Star Yes
8 Point Star Yes
Crescent Moon Yes
Equal Triangle Yes
Heart Yes
Octagon Yes
Pentagon Yes
Square Yes
Trapezoid Yes
Arc Down Yes
Arc Right Yes
Bounce Left Yes
Curvy Left Yes
Decaying Wave Yes
Diagonal Up Right Yes
Funnel Yes
Left Yes
S Curve 1 Yes
Sine Wave Yes
Spiral Right Yes
Stairs Down Yes
Turn Down Right Yes
Turn Up Right Yes
Wave Yes
Arc Left Yes
Arc Up Yes
Bounce Right Yes
Curvy Right Yes
Diagonal Down Right Yes
Down Yes
Heartbear Yes
Right Yes
S Curve 2 Yes
Spiral Left Yes
Spring Yes
Turn Down Yes
Turn Up Yes
Up Yes
Ziazag Yes
Bean Yes
Curved X Yes
Figure 8 Four Yes
Inverted Square Yes
Loop de Loop Yes
Peanut Yes
Pointy Star Yes
Vertical Figure 8 Yes
Curved Square Yes
Curvy Star Yes
Horizontal Figure8 Yes
Inverted Triangle Yes
Veutron Yes
Plus Yes
Swoosh Yes
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Learn how to use DPS for kiosk applications

My colleague Nissan Dachs and I wrote a new DevNet Article on how to set up your DPS app to work as a kiosk app using JavaScript and some new features found in DPS Release 32.

http://www.adobe.com/devnet/digitalpublishingsuite/articles/creating-kiosk-apps.html

We provide sample code, too, so check it out!

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Come learn about integrating DPS and CRM systems @AdobeMAX

I will be tag-teaming a session at Adobe MAX with my good friend David Schmidt. He and I will talk about how to integrate Adobe DPS applications with CRM systems such as salesforce.com. If you’ve been wondering how to take your sales enablement app to the next level, then this is definitely a session you won’t want to miss.

S2711 – Integrating DPS with CRM Systems Such as Salesforce.com for Business Impact

David Schmidt – Sr. Product Marketing Manager
James Lockman – Principal Solutions Consultant, Adobe

Learn how combining Digital Publishing Suite with CRM systems like Salesforce.com can enable breakthrough business results for your organization. See how Adobe equips its own sales team with a DPS-based sales enablement tool that allows rich presentations from tablets, access to centralized sales collateral, and powerful collection and analysis of sales metrics.

In this session, we will cover:

    • DPS features and APIs that provide flexible integration options with CRM systems
    • Leveraging DPS built-in analytics so that marketing and communication teams can optimize content and collateral, and easily push updates out to global sales and field personnel
    • Creating powerful management analytics dashboards by combining DPS and CRM data
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Protecting your Outlook database with Creative Cloud

I use Outlook on my Mac for email and calendaring. While I have access to Office 365 and the web versions of the apps that comprise it, I am more comfortable using the desktop application. In addition, I use email rules to help manage the large volume of messages I receive every day. Since I get a lot of email with a lot of attachments, my Outlook database gets large very quickly. Also, it goes corrupt from time to time. When I rebuild the database, very often my mail rules get confused and they need to be adjusted to point at the appropriate target folders. This is annoying. I decided that I needed to come up with a plan to make it easier to recover from database failure, and this article provides a solution, or at least some security if not a true solution.

Creative Cloud offers desktop file syncing for customers who install the Creative Cloud Desktop app. This works much like Dropbox, in that there is a folder on your computer that the CC Desktop app syncs with your CC folders online. This is a very handy feature for sure. You can learn how to enable desktop file syncing here. You can also share a folder with one or more other Creative Cloud users. In that case, all of the collaborators have access to the same files on their desktop. This is handy if you are working with a team and need to ensure that you all have the most current assets. You can learn how to share a folder with another Creative Cloud user here.

One of the benefits of using CC file sync is that your files are versioned in the cloud, which means that when you replace a file in your synced folder on your computer, the previous version is stored in the Cloud along with your current version. According to the CC Versioning FAQ, The Creative Cloud stores previous versions for 10 days, which is long enough for most users to be able to recover from a disastrous “Save” when you should have chosen “Save As…” Versioning is also our friend when we consider the Outlook database, because if I have previous versions of the database available, then I can roll back to a previous state and get back to work. Unfortunately, Outlook writes to the database frequently, so it is not a good idea to put your Microsoft User Data folder in your Creative Cloud folder. If you do, then CC will try to sync your Outlook database all the time, causing errors on both the CC side and on the Outlook side. A better strategy is to copy the Outlook database to a folder in CC on a schedule.

I use Automator to copy the Database, but it’s not as simple as “copy the Outlook database to my Creative Cloud folder.” Before you copy the database, however, it is best to ensure that Outlook is done with it. The best way to ensure that the database is “at rest” is to quit Outlook. Once Outlook has shut down, then it is safe to copy the database. When the copy is finished, then we need to restart Outlook. At the end, it is polite to send a message that the operation was successful. If you follow this flow, then you will safely have a versioned backup of your Outlook database going back 10 days.

In Automator, I created a workflow and used Calendar to schedule it. It uses the following actions in sequence:

  1. Quit Application: Microsoft Outlook
  2. Get Specified Finder Items: your Outlook Database file (not the enclosing folder)
  3. Copy Finder Items: to a folder in Creative Cloud called Database Backup
  4. Launch Application: Microsoft Outlook
  5. Display Notification Center Alert: Some message to let you know everything was successful

In order to send a Notification Center alert, I used a nifty Automation Action from Automated Workflows, LLC. Read about it and get it here.

The backup Outlook workflow in Automator

The backup Outlook workflow in Automator

If you would like to download the workflow and modify it for your own use, you can download the BackupOutlookDatabase workflow. Unzip the workflow and double click it to install. You will need to modify the workflow in order for it to work properly. Whether you download mine and modify it or make your own, you need to save the workflow and then save it again as an application in order to execute it with iCal.

To save your workflow as an application, you need to expose hidden menu options in Automator. Hold down the Option Key and click the File menu. You will now see Save As… Choose it and then save your workflow as an Application to a place you can find later.

Advanced Options in File Menu

Hold down the Option Key to expose Advanced Options in File Menu

Save as Application

Save as Application

Now, you need to schedule the workflow to run at a convenient time. I used Calendar to schedule the event, since the whole premise here is that the Outlook Database can become corrupt. If we use Calendar, then there is some built-in peace of mind because we’re using another system to backup the system of record. In Calendar, create a new calendar called Automator so you can hide the daily backup events. In the Automator Calendar, create a new event called “Backup Outlook” at a convenient time for you. I chose 2:00 am Eastern Time. Set this event to recur every day with no expiration. Set the action to Open File>Other… and browse to your Automator Workflow Application that you made in the last step.

Det the calendar event properties

Det the calendar event properties

There you have it: an automated backup for your Outlook Database using your Creative Cloud account. It is important to note that your computer needs to be in a state to run the Workflow at the time you designate, so if you have a laptop, you might want to leave it open or on overnight. It’s OK if the computer goes to sleep. The workflow will run so long as the computer isn’t powered down.

I mentioned that another benefit of using Creative Cloud for the backup is that the Database will be versioned in the cloud. This lets you go back in time if you inadvertently backup a corrupt database and need to go back a few days. To view file versions in Creative Cloud, go to your Creative Cloud account in a browser and click on Files, then click through to your Database file. Click on your Database to open the details view, and then click on the Activity link to view the file activity. Here, you can view annotations and versions in a timeline on the right. Choose the version you’d like to restore, and then either click the Restore link or the Restore icon to the left of the version.

Choose Versions from the Activity Timeline

Choose Versions from the Activity Timeline

Select a version and click Restore

Select a version and click Restore

Once you choose Restore, you will need to confirm that you really want to restore your version.

Confirm that you want to restore a version

Confirm that you want to restore a version

Once you click Restore, your previous version of the Database will be restored and will immediately begin to sync with you CC Desktop folder. Depending on your Internet speed, it may take a while for the previous version to appear on your computer. You will get an alert from CC telling you that the file has been updated. Once you get that alert, you can safely use it to replace your corrupt Outlook Database file and get back to work.

This method has saved me hours of frustration, and while I don’t wish Outlook Database corruption on you, using this method could save you hours of frustration, too.

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