Come learn about integrating DPS and CRM systems @AdobeMAX

I will be tag-teaming a session at Adobe MAX with my good friend David Schmidt. He and I will talk about how to integrate Adobe DPS applications with CRM systems such as salesforce.com. If you’ve been wondering how to take your sales enablement app to the next level, then this is definitely a session you won’t want to miss.

S2711 – Integrating DPS with CRM Systems Such as Salesforce.com for Business Impact

David Schmidt – Sr. Product Marketing Manager
James Lockman – Principal Solutions Consultant, Adobe

Learn how combining Digital Publishing Suite with CRM systems like Salesforce.com can enable breakthrough business results for your organization. See how Adobe equips its own sales team with a DPS-based sales enablement tool that allows rich presentations from tablets, access to centralized sales collateral, and powerful collection and analysis of sales metrics.

In this session, we will cover:

    • DPS features and APIs that provide flexible integration options with CRM systems
    • Leveraging DPS built-in analytics so that marketing and communication teams can optimize content and collateral, and easily push updates out to global sales and field personnel
    • Creating powerful management analytics dashboards by combining DPS and CRM data
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Protecting your Outlook database with Creative Cloud

I use Outlook on my Mac for email and calendaring. While I have access to Office 365 and the web versions of the apps that comprise it, I am more comfortable using the desktop application. In addition, I use email rules to help manage the large volume of messages I receive every day. Since I get a lot of email with a lot of attachments, my Outlook database gets large very quickly. Also, it goes corrupt from time to time. When I rebuild the database, very often my mail rules get confused and they need to be adjusted to point at the appropriate target folders. This is annoying. I decided that I needed to come up with a plan to make it easier to recover from database failure, and this article provides a solution, or at least some security if not a true solution.

Creative Cloud offers desktop file syncing for customers who install the Creative Cloud Desktop app. This works much like Dropbox, in that there is a folder on your computer that the CC Desktop app syncs with your CC folders online. This is a very handy feature for sure. You can learn how to enable desktop file syncing here. You can also share a folder with one or more other Creative Cloud users. In that case, all of the collaborators have access to the same files on their desktop. This is handy if you are working with a team and need to ensure that you all have the most current assets. You can learn how to share a folder with another Creative Cloud user here.

One of the benefits of using CC file sync is that your files are versioned in the cloud, which means that when you replace a file in your synced folder on your computer, the previous version is stored in the Cloud along with your current version. According to the CC Versioning FAQ, The Creative Cloud stores previous versions for 10 days, which is long enough for most users to be able to recover from a disastrous “Save” when you should have chosen “Save As…” Versioning is also our friend when we consider the Outlook database, because if I have previous versions of the database available, then I can roll back to a previous state and get back to work. Unfortunately, Outlook writes to the database frequently, so it is not a good idea to put your Microsoft User Data folder in your Creative Cloud folder. If you do, then CC will try to sync your Outlook database all the time, causing errors on both the CC side and on the Outlook side. A better strategy is to copy the Outlook database to a folder in CC on a schedule.

I use Automator to copy the Database, but it’s not as simple as “copy the Outlook database to my Creative Cloud folder.” Before you copy the database, however, it is best to ensure that Outlook is done with it. The best way to ensure that the database is “at rest” is to quit Outlook. Once Outlook has shut down, then it is safe to copy the database. When the copy is finished, then we need to restart Outlook. At the end, it is polite to send a message that the operation was successful. If you follow this flow, then you will safely have a versioned backup of your Outlook database going back 10 days.

In Automator, I created a workflow and used Calendar to schedule it. It uses the following actions in sequence:

  1. Quit Application: Microsoft Outlook
  2. Get Specified Finder Items: your Outlook Database file (not the enclosing folder)
  3. Copy Finder Items: to a folder in Creative Cloud called Database Backup
  4. Launch Application: Microsoft Outlook
  5. Display Notification Center Alert: Some message to let you know everything was successful

In order to send a Notification Center alert, I used a nifty Automation Action from Automated Workflows, LLC. Read about it and get it here.

The backup Outlook workflow in Automator

The backup Outlook workflow in Automator

If you would like to download the workflow and modify it for your own use, you can download the BackupOutlookDatabase workflow. Unzip the workflow and double click it to install. You will need to modify the workflow in order for it to work properly. Whether you download mine and modify it or make your own, you need to save the workflow and then save it again as an application in order to execute it with iCal.

To save your workflow as an application, you need to expose hidden menu options in Automator. Hold down the Option Key and click the File menu. You will now see Save As… Choose it and then save your workflow as an Application to a place you can find later.

Advanced Options in File Menu

Hold down the Option Key to expose Advanced Options in File Menu

Save as Application

Save as Application

Now, you need to schedule the workflow to run at a convenient time. I used Calendar to schedule the event, since the whole premise here is that the Outlook Database can become corrupt. If we use Calendar, then there is some built-in peace of mind because we’re using another system to backup the system of record. In Calendar, create a new calendar called Automator so you can hide the daily backup events. In the Automator Calendar, create a new event called “Backup Outlook” at a convenient time for you. I chose 2:00 am Eastern Time. Set this event to recur every day with no expiration. Set the action to Open File>Other… and browse to your Automator Workflow Application that you made in the last step.

Det the calendar event properties

Det the calendar event properties

There you have it: an automated backup for your Outlook Database using your Creative Cloud account. It is important to note that your computer needs to be in a state to run the Workflow at the time you designate, so if you have a laptop, you might want to leave it open or on overnight. It’s OK if the computer goes to sleep. The workflow will run so long as the computer isn’t powered down.

I mentioned that another benefit of using Creative Cloud for the backup is that the Database will be versioned in the cloud. This lets you go back in time if you inadvertently backup a corrupt database and need to go back a few days. To view file versions in Creative Cloud, go to your Creative Cloud account in a browser and click on Files, then click through to your Database file. Click on your Database to open the details view, and then click on the Activity link to view the file activity. Here, you can view annotations and versions in a timeline on the right. Choose the version you’d like to restore, and then either click the Restore link or the Restore icon to the left of the version.

Choose Versions from the Activity Timeline

Choose Versions from the Activity Timeline

Select a version and click Restore

Select a version and click Restore

Once you choose Restore, you will need to confirm that you really want to restore your version.

Confirm that you want to restore a version

Confirm that you want to restore a version

Once you click Restore, your previous version of the Database will be restored and will immediately begin to sync with you CC Desktop folder. Depending on your Internet speed, it may take a while for the previous version to appear on your computer. You will get an alert from CC telling you that the file has been updated. Once you get that alert, you can safely use it to replace your corrupt Outlook Database file and get back to work.

This method has saved me hours of frustration, and while I don’t wish Outlook Database corruption on you, using this method could save you hours of frustration, too.

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I’ll be speaking at Adobe MAX this year!

I will be presenting a session on Variable Data Design at Adobe MAX this year. While I’ve presented at MAX previously, recently it’s been all DPS or AEM-related discussions. This talk digs deep to my roots in Data Driven Marketing and Variable Data Publishing. From the abstract:

Learn how to take personalized communications beyond email. Before email, there was data merge, which enables you to create personalized print materials using the design tools you already know and love. Whether for mailing campaigns, photo books, directories, business cards, or even t-shirts, you can use data merge to personalize your projects.

In this session, you’ll discover how to:

  • Unlock the potential of personalization in InDesign
  • Use Illustrator and Photoshop to generate personalized assets to use with InDesign
  • Manage personalization on a large scale with popular third-party variable data printing (VDP) solutions
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Easy way to get notifications about the status of the DPS Services

An example of the DPS Status Dashboard

An example of the DPS Status Dashboard

Many of my customers ask how to see a dashboard that shows the status of the DPS services. You can find it at status.adobedps.com In addition to the nice dashboard like the one at the right of this text, there is also a blog that discusses upcoming maintenance and emergent issues. I encourage everyone to visit the DPS Status site from time to time just for the blog. You may be unaware of the constant innovation that happens within the DPS services, and the blog is a great place to get a glimpse into what’s happening.

Now, what if you’re wanting to know about issues before you get frustrated because something is slow or not working? Easy! Sign up for our email notification service!

Sign up for Email Notifications for when the DPS Services encounter issues

Sign up for Email Notifications

Yes, that’s right! You can get an email whenever something goes sproing! in the DPS service. If you manage a team of designers, encourage them all to subscribe so that they don’t bug you in the middle of the night with DPS service questions. It won’t help you if your designer’s close the “Interactive Overlays” panel and can’t find it anymore, but it will let them know if there’s something going on with DPS so they can let you sleep.

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Considerations for using Secure Content with DPS

In Release 30 of the Digital Publishing Suite, Adobe introduced a feature for Enterprise customers that lets a publisher encrypt folios. This feature arose out of many requests from Corporate customers who wanted to use DPS for sensitive content but believed that the DPS Service did not offer robust content protection for folios in the Distribution Service or in flight between the Service and a Custom Viewer. While Device Content Protection is an effective method of protecting content on the device, it does not offer protection for content in the DPS Service. In Release 30, a publisher can now opt to publish encrypted folios to the Distribution Service, which satisfies many customers’ requirements for using DPS to deliver sensitive content to their tablet-enabled workforces. Enabling encryption impacts the content creation, publishing, and reading experiences, however. This article will explore the changes to each of those experiences.

Enabling Secure Content

The DPS Help Document for Secure Content provides instructions on how to enable encrypted folios. It’s not just about folios, as you’ll discover when you read that article. Your app must be built to enable the device’s Secure Content mechanism, which means that you will need to rebuild your existing app. My Protecting content on an iOS Device with DPS article in DevNet outlines the hows and whys of enabling secure content on your iOS device. Of course, your custom Viewer needs to be at R30 or higher to use encrypted folios, so you can use this as an opportunity to update your Push Notification tokens as well as add in some other App features like the Welcome Screen.

In conjunction with updating  your Viewer to R30, you also need to enable Secure Content in your Application Account. This requires administrative access to the Account Administration tool.

Enable Secure Content in DPS Account Administration

Enable Secure Content in DPS Account Administration

Once enabled, the account will now have some limits applied to it, which we will explore in some detail.

Limits enhance security for content creators

Secure content has some important implications for workflow. From the content creation side, customers expect that it should be hard for content to escape the control of the Enterprise. For content creators, it means that they will be restricted in how they can proof or share secure articles.

Preview options for Secure Content

Preview options for Secure Content

Proofing

Proofing folios in a Secure Content account is limited to either desktop or tethered proofing. This means that in order to proof a folio, you need to either test it on the desktop from InDesign or connect your iPad to your Mac and turn on the Content Viewer. Once connected, you can click on the Preview… menu in the Folio Builder panel and choose your iPad. For customers using the Media Publisher in Adobe Experience Manager or another Web CMS for managing folio content, this presents a unique challenge.

When publishers use Media Publisher or other CMS, the expectation is that all folio creation is done in a browser and that InDesign is not usually part of the workflow. It is not uncommon for there to be hundreds of contributors in a large organization, and those contributors tend to be business users or knowledge workers with no access to InDesign. For accounts without Secure Content enabled, this presents no problem, since content creators can always push their content to the Folio Producer, turn on their iPad, open Content Viewer, and sign in with the Application Account credentials to proof content.

One potential workaround is to create content using a “dummy” account that does not have Secure Content enabled. This “dummy” or staging account can be an Application account or an individual contributor account that will never have an App associated with it and will only be used as a staging account for the Secure Content. As a best practice, the Enterprise should develop a policy around these staging accounts so that content will be auditable by appropriate regulatory or brand authorities within the Enterprise. In addition, the Enterprise should establish review and approval workflows within these staging accounts and a workflow for migrating content from the staging account to the deployment (Secure Content) account. Authors will create and proof their content in the staging account. Once ready for review and approval, the author would start the review and approval workflow and reviewers can review content on their iPads with Content Viewer. In cases where the Enterprise does not want any content to be viewable unless on a tethered iPad, then authors and reviewers will need access to InDesign on their desktop machines in order to proof their folios.

Article Sharing

All article sharing from a Secure Content account will be disabled. This means that if you currently share content between accounts, you will need to consider the flow of that content. It is possible to share an article from an account that does not have Secure Content enabled to a Secure Content account, though, as described in the previous paragraph in the staging account workflow. The expectation is that content in a secure account should remain in the secure account, and limiting sharing from that account reduces risk. As stated above, customers may need to adjust their workflows to consider the secure account as an endpoint for content rather than a source of content in situations where folio sharing is common.

In order to publish shared content in the secure account, a person with appropriate authority will need to log into Folio Producer and copy the shared article. Once copied, the original folio can be deleted from the Secure Content account, which will break the sharing relationship with the staging account. Unless there is a reason to keep the original shared folio in place, it may be best to remove the shared folio to reduce confusion and clutter in the Folio Producer.

Publishing encrypted folios

Enable encrypted folio upon publishing

Enable encrypted folio upon publishing

Once approved, it’s time to publish the folio. Once all of the required metadata is in place, you can push the Publish button in Folio Producer. You will notice a new checkbox: Encrypt Folio. This needs to be enabled for your folio to be encrypted in the Distribution Service.

In addition, there is an expectation among Enterprise customers that secure content needs to reside behind authentication. As a result, readers need to be entitled to any secure folios in order to view them in a Custom Viewer. This means that all encrypted folios need to be Retail folios, and the Custom Viewer needs to leverage Direct Entitlement or, more granularly, Restricted Distribution. The Enterprise will need to manage the relationship between the authenticated reader and published folios in its Entitlement solution. Once you configure the folio as Retail and enable Encrypt Folio, you can Publish the folio.

Reader experience for Secure Content

Having reviewed how Secure Content constrains the content creation workflow, let’s turn to the reader experience. From the reader’s standpoint, they should not be able to tell the difference between an encrypted folio and an non-encrypted folio. While this is generally true, there are a few differences that readers may notice when using Secure Content.

Complete download required

In a traditional workflow, DPS offers progressive downloads for content. This feature allows a reader to begin reading an article while other articles are loading. In a Secure Content workflow, the entire folio needs to be present on the device in order for it to be decrypted. As a result, secure folios may appear to take longer to download. You may want to adjust your strategy with respect to folio organization if you routinely make very large folios if the download experience is disruptive. For most Enterprise customers implementing Content Protection, this delay should be communicated to users so that they are prepared for longer wait times when they first download a folio.

Once downloaded, the folio is ready for reading and will behave like any other folio, with the exception of Social Sharing.

Mitigating social sharing risk

One of the ways that content can escape the control of the Enterprise is through a reader socially sharing the article. When you enable Secure Content, any encrypted articles will not be able to be socially shared, regardless of the settings in the Application Account. This also means that no Web renditions will be created from any articles in encrypted folios, regardless of whether they are Protected, Metered or Free. It is a best practice, therefore, to disable Social Sharing in App Builder when making apps for Secure Content accounts. For many Corporate use cases, social sharing is inappropriate, since the content in the app is usually intended to be viewed in the secure context of the Custom Viewer. If it is necessary to mix Socially Shareable articles with encrypted articles, then the user may be able to generate a “dead” URL for the encrypted article by tapping on the Social Share button, which would be a jarring user experience. In that instance, it is best to warn the reader that an article is protected and that it is not intended to be Socially Shared.

Use cases for Secure Content

Secure Content is inappropriate for most traditional publishing use cases, and it was not designed as a Digital Rights Management (DRM) scheme for folios. It is intended to offer Corporate publishers a method of protecting sensitive content while that content is in the Folio Distribution service and to limit the pathways for that content to escape the control of the Enterprise.

Common use cases for Secure Content include manuals, Board of Directors packages, regulated content, proprietary documentation, sales material, and other sensitive materials. Knowing that all encryption is susceptible to attack, Adobe uses very powerful encryption technology to protect the folios in the Distribution Service. Nevertheless, each Enterprise needs to evaluate whether its content requires this level of protection. For many customers, unencrypted folios are perfectly acceptable. For others, encryption will be a requirement. Encrypted content expands the reach of the DPS service for Enterprises and offers those customers a pathway to distribute sensitive content to tablets.

 

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