Posts tagged "Adobe"

Easy way to get notifications about the status of the DPS Services

An example of the DPS Status Dashboard

An example of the DPS Status Dashboard

Many of my customers ask how to see a dashboard that shows the status of the DPS services. You can find it at status.adobedps.com In addition to the nice dashboard like the one at the right of this text, there is also a blog that discusses upcoming maintenance and emergent issues. I encourage everyone to visit the DPS Status site from time to time just for the blog. You may be unaware of the constant innovation that happens within the DPS services, and the blog is a great place to get a glimpse into what’s happening.

Now, what if you’re wanting to know about issues before you get frustrated because something is slow or not working? Easy! Sign up for our email notification service!

Sign up for Email Notifications for when the DPS Services encounter issues

Sign up for Email Notifications

Yes, that’s right! You can get an email whenever something goes sproing! in the DPS service. If you manage a team of designers, encourage them all to subscribe so that they don’t bug you in the middle of the night with DPS service questions. It won’t help you if your designer’s close the “Interactive Overlays” panel and can’t find it anymore, but it will let them know if there’s something going on with DPS so they can let you sleep.

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Restore your Twitter feed to your DPS application

Since the advent of the Twitter API V1.1, DPS customers found their embedded Twitter feeds no longer working. With the help of geniuses Josh Penrod and Emily Ragle of at Joe Zeff Design, I wrote an Adobe Developer Network article on the subject. It requires some coding and access to a publicly available web server, but it works and we’re delighted to share how to do it. (If you have my DPS Examples app installed on your iPad, and you’re reading this blog on your iPad, then tap here to see an example of a working Twitter feed in my DPS Examples app.)

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Using Captivate 7 projects with DPS

I had posted a fix for using Captivate 6 HTML5 projects in DPS. In that article, I showed how to remove embedded browser check code so that your project would render without a browser check in DPS. However, in Captivate 7, removing the browser check script from the index.html file doesn’t do the job.  (If you have my DPS Examples app installed on your iPad, and you’re reading this blog on your iPad, then tap here to see examples of Captivate content running in a DPS folio.)

I asked the Captivate engineers if they had a trick up their sleeves, and this is what they delivered (thanks to Suresh Jayaraman and independently to Mayank Mahajan: if you see either of them, give them each a high five…)

  1. Open “AdobeCaptivate.ini” file present in Adobe Captivate installation folder .
  2. Add the following line of text at line 2 or line 3 of the “AdobeCaptivate.ini” file .
    • SuppressIncompatibleBrowserMessage = 1
  3. Publish the project to HTML 5

Now, the result is a folder with an index.html file. As I indicated in the earlier article, you can then make a Web Content overlay and point it at your index file. Another approach is to use the Captivate project as an HTML article rather than in a Web Content Overlay.

If you have portrait-only folio, rename the index.html file to index_v.html. If you have a landscape-only folio, rename the index.html file to index_h.html. If you have a dual-orientation folio, don’t change the name of the index.html file. In the Folio Builder panel of InDesign CC, click the “Add article” button and choose Import Article.

Add an article to your folio

Enter your article metadata and then browse to the folder that contains your Captivate project, and then click OK.

Import the HTML Article

InDesign will now seem to go into zombie mode, in which it will appear to be processing the HTML folder, but will never finish the task. The solution, which I outlined in another blog post, is to quit InDesign while it is hanging on the HTML import. Actually, what you need to do is to tell inDesign to quit, but don’t actually quit. Instead, wait, and InDesign will emerge from its coma and finish importing the HTML article.

Quit InDesign CC to complete the import

Then, you can politely tell the “Do you really want to quit?” dialog that you do not want to quit, and your HTML project from Captivate will now be safely in your folio, with no browser check. Once published, your user will need to push the “play” button on the Captivate project to start it, which is annoying to be sure. I hope the Captivate engineers will allow us one day to auto play a Captivate HTML5 project, if only in our DPS folios.

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Adobe DPS ACE Exam now available!

Many people who work with DPS want a way to prove to their employers (and potential employers…) that they indeed know their stuff when it comes to DPS. Adobe has offered Adobe Certified Expert (ACE) exams for many years to help creatives prove their skills with many other Adobe tools and services, and now it has published an ACE exam for DPS.

To receive credit for passing the exam, you will need to have passed the ACE exam for InDesign CS5, CS6 or CC. View a complete list of available exams for Adobe at PearsonVUE. When you log in to PearsonVue, you should scroll all the way down to item 9A0-365 and add it to your cart. Then, clear your desk, shut off your email, and take the exam online.

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Content protection for DPS article available on DevNet

I have a new article available on the Adobe Developer Network that explains how to protect your DPS content on your iPad.

Read the article

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