Posts tagged "InDesign"

A new and simplified Notetaking solution for DPS

Many of my DPS customers want to incorporate note taking into their DPS apps. Over the years, there have been several examples posted to DevNet, including one by me back in 2013. One of the challenges with that solution was that it requires the designer to make multiple copies of the underlying HTML file in order to support placing the note taking overlay on more than one page in an article. I have gone back and revised that code to make it work with a single HTML file that supports any number of pages in an article. You can read about the new technique here.

The new system has CSS styling to help match it to your brand. In addition, I’ve added a button to email a specific note as well as the whole set of notes. I’ve also been working on extending the system to include thumbnail images of the specific pages in the email. I’ve got a little more work to do on that before I’m ready to share it, but keep your eyes here (and on DevNet) for a follow-up article about embedding images in email messages from DPS.

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Learn how to use DPS for kiosk applications

My colleague Nissan Dachs and I wrote a new DevNet Article on how to set up your DPS app to work as a kiosk app using JavaScript and some new features found in DPS Release 32.

http://www.adobe.com/devnet/digitalpublishingsuite/articles/creating-kiosk-apps.html

We provide sample code, too, so check it out!

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I’ll be speaking at Adobe MAX this year!

I will be presenting a session on Variable Data Design at Adobe MAX this year. While I’ve presented at MAX previously, recently it’s been all DPS or AEM-related discussions. This talk digs deep to my roots in Data Driven Marketing and Variable Data Publishing. From the abstract:

Learn how to take personalized communications beyond email. Before email, there was data merge, which enables you to create personalized print materials using the design tools you already know and love. Whether for mailing campaigns, photo books, directories, business cards, or even t-shirts, you can use data merge to personalize your projects.

In this session, you’ll discover how to:

  • Unlock the potential of personalization in InDesign
  • Use Illustrator and Photoshop to generate personalized assets to use with InDesign
  • Manage personalization on a large scale with popular third-party variable data printing (VDP) solutions
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Considerations for using Secure Content with DPS

In Release 30 of the Digital Publishing Suite, Adobe introduced a feature for Enterprise customers that lets a publisher encrypt folios. This feature arose out of many requests from Corporate customers who wanted to use DPS for sensitive content but believed that the DPS Service did not offer robust content protection for folios in the Distribution Service or in flight between the Service and a Custom Viewer. While Device Content Protection is an effective method of protecting content on the device, it does not offer protection for content in the DPS Service. In Release 30, a publisher can now opt to publish encrypted folios to the Distribution Service, which satisfies many customers’ requirements for using DPS to deliver sensitive content to their tablet-enabled workforces. Enabling encryption impacts the content creation, publishing, and reading experiences, however. This article will explore the changes to each of those experiences.

Enabling Secure Content

The DPS Help Document for Secure Content provides instructions on how to enable encrypted folios. It’s not just about folios, as you’ll discover when you read that article. Your app must be built to enable the device’s Secure Content mechanism, which means that you will need to rebuild your existing app. My Protecting content on an iOS Device with DPS article in DevNet outlines the hows and whys of enabling secure content on your iOS device. Of course, your custom Viewer needs to be at R30 or higher to use encrypted folios, so you can use this as an opportunity to update your Push Notification tokens as well as add in some other App features like the Welcome Screen.

In conjunction with updating  your Viewer to R30, you also need to enable Secure Content in your Application Account. This requires administrative access to the Account Administration tool.

Enable Secure Content in DPS Account Administration

Enable Secure Content in DPS Account Administration

Once enabled, the account will now have some limits applied to it, which we will explore in some detail.

Limits enhance security for content creators

Secure content has some important implications for workflow. From the content creation side, customers expect that it should be hard for content to escape the control of the Enterprise. For content creators, it means that they will be restricted in how they can proof or share secure articles.

Preview options for Secure Content

Preview options for Secure Content

Proofing

Proofing folios in a Secure Content account is limited to either desktop or tethered proofing. This means that in order to proof a folio, you need to either test it on the desktop from InDesign or connect your iPad to your Mac and turn on the Content Viewer. Once connected, you can click on the Preview… menu in the Folio Builder panel and choose your iPad. For customers using the Media Publisher in Adobe Experience Manager or another Web CMS for managing folio content, this presents a unique challenge.

When publishers use Media Publisher or other CMS, the expectation is that all folio creation is done in a browser and that InDesign is not usually part of the workflow. It is not uncommon for there to be hundreds of contributors in a large organization, and those contributors tend to be business users or knowledge workers with no access to InDesign. For accounts without Secure Content enabled, this presents no problem, since content creators can always push their content to the Folio Producer, turn on their iPad, open Content Viewer, and sign in with the Application Account credentials to proof content.

One potential workaround is to create content using a “dummy” account that does not have Secure Content enabled. This “dummy” or staging account can be an Application account or an individual contributor account that will never have an App associated with it and will only be used as a staging account for the Secure Content. As a best practice, the Enterprise should develop a policy around these staging accounts so that content will be auditable by appropriate regulatory or brand authorities within the Enterprise. In addition, the Enterprise should establish review and approval workflows within these staging accounts and a workflow for migrating content from the staging account to the deployment (Secure Content) account. Authors will create and proof their content in the staging account. Once ready for review and approval, the author would start the review and approval workflow and reviewers can review content on their iPads with Content Viewer. In cases where the Enterprise does not want any content to be viewable unless on a tethered iPad, then authors and reviewers will need access to InDesign on their desktop machines in order to proof their folios.

Article Sharing

All article sharing from a Secure Content account will be disabled. This means that if you currently share content between accounts, you will need to consider the flow of that content. It is possible to share an article from an account that does not have Secure Content enabled to a Secure Content account, though, as described in the previous paragraph in the staging account workflow. The expectation is that content in a secure account should remain in the secure account, and limiting sharing from that account reduces risk. As stated above, customers may need to adjust their workflows to consider the secure account as an endpoint for content rather than a source of content in situations where folio sharing is common.

In order to publish shared content in the secure account, a person with appropriate authority will need to log into Folio Producer and copy the shared article. Once copied, the original folio can be deleted from the Secure Content account, which will break the sharing relationship with the staging account. Unless there is a reason to keep the original shared folio in place, it may be best to remove the shared folio to reduce confusion and clutter in the Folio Producer.

Publishing encrypted folios

Enable encrypted folio upon publishing

Enable encrypted folio upon publishing

Once approved, it’s time to publish the folio. Once all of the required metadata is in place, you can push the Publish button in Folio Producer. You will notice a new checkbox: Encrypt Folio. This needs to be enabled for your folio to be encrypted in the Distribution Service.

In addition, there is an expectation among Enterprise customers that secure content needs to reside behind authentication. As a result, readers need to be entitled to any secure folios in order to view them in a Custom Viewer. This means that all encrypted folios need to be Retail folios, and the Custom Viewer needs to leverage Direct Entitlement or, more granularly, Restricted Distribution. The Enterprise will need to manage the relationship between the authenticated reader and published folios in its Entitlement solution. Once you configure the folio as Retail and enable Encrypt Folio, you can Publish the folio.

Reader experience for Secure Content

Having reviewed how Secure Content constrains the content creation workflow, let’s turn to the reader experience. From the reader’s standpoint, they should not be able to tell the difference between an encrypted folio and an non-encrypted folio. While this is generally true, there are a few differences that readers may notice when using Secure Content.

Complete download required

In a traditional workflow, DPS offers progressive downloads for content. This feature allows a reader to begin reading an article while other articles are loading. In a Secure Content workflow, the entire folio needs to be present on the device in order for it to be decrypted. As a result, secure folios may appear to take longer to download. You may want to adjust your strategy with respect to folio organization if you routinely make very large folios if the download experience is disruptive. For most Enterprise customers implementing Content Protection, this delay should be communicated to users so that they are prepared for longer wait times when they first download a folio.

Once downloaded, the folio is ready for reading and will behave like any other folio, with the exception of Social Sharing.

Mitigating social sharing risk

One of the ways that content can escape the control of the Enterprise is through a reader socially sharing the article. When you enable Secure Content, any encrypted articles will not be able to be socially shared, regardless of the settings in the Application Account. This also means that no Web renditions will be created from any articles in encrypted folios, regardless of whether they are Protected, Metered or Free. It is a best practice, therefore, to disable Social Sharing in App Builder when making apps for Secure Content accounts. For many Corporate use cases, social sharing is inappropriate, since the content in the app is usually intended to be viewed in the secure context of the Custom Viewer. If it is necessary to mix Socially Shareable articles with encrypted articles, then the user may be able to generate a “dead” URL for the encrypted article by tapping on the Social Share button, which would be a jarring user experience. In that instance, it is best to warn the reader that an article is protected and that it is not intended to be Socially Shared.

Use cases for Secure Content

Secure Content is inappropriate for most traditional publishing use cases, and it was not designed as a Digital Rights Management (DRM) scheme for folios. It is intended to offer Corporate publishers a method of protecting sensitive content while that content is in the Folio Distribution service and to limit the pathways for that content to escape the control of the Enterprise.

Common use cases for Secure Content include manuals, Board of Directors packages, regulated content, proprietary documentation, sales material, and other sensitive materials. Knowing that all encryption is susceptible to attack, Adobe uses very powerful encryption technology to protect the folios in the Distribution Service. Nevertheless, each Enterprise needs to evaluate whether its content requires this level of protection. For many customers, unencrypted folios are perfectly acceptable. For others, encryption will be a requirement. Encrypted content expands the reach of the DPS service for Enterprises and offers those customers a pathway to distribute sensitive content to tablets.

 

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Using Edge Animate CC projects as HTML DPS articles with InDesign CC

Since its release (or pre-release…), designers have used Edge Animate to bring HTML5 animations to their DPS projects. While most designers place their projects into InDesign-based articles, some have asked how to use Edge Animate CC assets as HTML articles. Learn more about HTML articles in DPS Help. When they try to import the project after publishing it for Web from Edge Animate, however, they run into an issue with InDesign not being able to convert the HTML into an article. There is a workaround, at least for InDesign CC users. CS6 users won’t be able to use this workaround.

Edge Animate makes a single HTML file that references assets, CSS and Javascript files. This is good, because this is exactly the structure that DPS wants for an HTML article.  Your project needs to be called “index” for dual orientation articles, and  “index_h”, or “index_v” for single orientation articles. When you publish from Edge Animate, it makes a folder called “Web” in the “Publish” folder. In that folder will be a file called “index.html” (or “index_h.html” or “index_v.html”). From InDesign, open the Folio Builder panel, open your folio, and click the “Add Article” and choose “Import Article,” or choose “Import Article…” from the flyout menu. Fill in your article metadata, and then browse to the Web folder in the Publish folder of your Animate project. When you have everything set up for your article, click OK.

This is the point when things begin to go wrong. InDesign now attempts to convert the Animate project to a DPS article. You will discover that it will try for a very, very, very long time, although it will not finish the job. If you remove the file called “index_edgePreload.js” (or _h or _v), you will be able to upload the project, but it won’t work. It seems that InDesign must render the HTML in order to create a TOC image for the article, and it fails when it tries. It turns out that there is a way to force InDesign to complete the task, however.

Right after you click OK, quit InDesign. Seriously. Quit InDesign. Or, more correctly, ask InDesign to quit. At that point, you will see an alert box telling you that Folio Builder is busy “Building folio.” DO NOT click either of the buttons in the dialog box until you see the “Please Wait… Building Folio” alert appear and then disappear. Pay attention, because it might go by very quickly. When it’s gone by, click “No.”

Forcing an Edge Animate project to upload

 

Now, your Edge Animate project has been converted to an article and you can preview it in your browser or on your device. Timing is a consideration, of course. If you build an animation that is set to auto play, it is likely to play when you’re not looking at it, especially if it is not the article that opens when the folio opens. DPS will preload HTML articles adjacent to the article you are viewing, so those autoplay animations will animate and stop when you are not looking at them. If you place them onto an InDesign layout, then you have better control over when they play.

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