May 20, 2010

Demo: Illustrator + HTML5

Round 2 in “a little less conversation, a little more action:”
Today during the keynote at Google’s I/O conference, Adobe CTO Kevin Lynch demoed Illustrator and Dreamweaver working together to create interactive Web graphics:

I should hasten to note that although Illustrator has supported creation of interactive, open-standard SVG for 10 years, the exact capability shown here isn’t part of Illustrator CS5. HTML5 is a work in progress, and not everything could make it into the current release, but work continues and we’ll keep sharing details as they become available.
See also from last fall: Sneak peek: Illustrator + Flash + Dreamweaver -> CANVAS

Posted by John Nack at 9:54 PM on May 20, 2010

Comments

  • Simon — 5:20 AM on May 21, 2010

    Nice one. Enjoying the HTML5/CSS3 Dreamweaver pack. Can’t wait to see this sort of SVG/JS integration or canvas export from Illustrator.

  • thinsoldier — 10:19 AM on May 21, 2010

    I’m a type of colorblind. I couldn’t tell which were booked and which were free :(
    Who chose that color scheme?

  • DF — 9:04 PM on May 21, 2010

    I should hasten to note that although Illustrator has supported creation of interactive, open-standard SVG for 10 year
    Given the complete abandonment by Adobe of the SVG plugin when you bought Flash, any lingering SVG support in Illustrator really doesn’t earn you credit (and as you say yourself, better SVG support appears to be sitting on the same shelf that HTML5 was on. Bad karma, Adobe)
    [Yes, it’s always Adobe that’s at fault–always. The browser vendors (mainly MSFT) failing to get their stuff together and offer robust SVG support is Adobe’s fault. I love to hear people advocating whatever will reach that conclusion (e.g. we should have invested more in browser plug-ins; yet all browser plug-ins (and Adobe’s in particular) suck; etc.). –J.]

  • Vincent — 2:13 AM on May 22, 2010

    How un-userfriendly is that. Frankly, instead of triying to find the next shining feature for marketing purposes, you should really work on optimizing your software’s UIs.

  • Phillip Kerman — 10:42 AM on May 23, 2010

    Kevin’s demo was brilliant–up until he showed that crazy thing using Illustrator > SVG > interactive/dynamic clock graphics. So absurd. Is Adobe serious that this is a workflow they’re recommending, supporting, and hearing a demand for? If so, I must live in a different world.
    I found THAT PART of the demo absurd.
    [I’m not an expert on The Right & Modern Way to deliver such content, but given that Flash Player is obviously an evil, sulfurous, hell-spawned abomination, what *is* the WHATWG-sanctioned method for delivering interactive vector graphics online? –J.]

  • DF — 4:09 PM on May 23, 2010

    [Yes, it’s always Adobe that’s at fault–always. The browser vendors (mainly MSFT) failing to get their stuff together and offer robust SVG support is Adobe’s fault. I love to hear people advocating whatever will reach that conclusion (e.g. we should have invested more in browser plug-ins; yet all browser plug-ins (and Adobe’s in particular) suck; etc.). –J.]
    Woah – slow down, there. I know that the Flash plugin is a touchy subject for you guys at Adobe right now, but I’m not bringing it up in that context.
    Now, as you haven’t denied it here, I’m presuming that you agree that SVG within Adobe died a death the minute Macromedia (and hence Flash) was bought. As someone whose workplaces’ intranet GIS systems depend on the unfinished beta Adobe SVG plugin from many years ago, I just happen to have awareness of the issue.
    I look forward to considerable progress over the next couple of years, with hopefully all major browsers natively supporting SVG.
    [Thanks for the details, and here’s hoping for widespread, consistent browser support. –J.]

Copyright © 2014 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy and Cookies (Updated)