January 20, 2014

Students: Become an Adobe rep

Back in college—in the daaark days for Apple (the lose-$700MM+-in-a-quarter days)—I was an Apple student rep, driving around a minivan full of swag & hipping people to the technologies I loved. It was a bumpy time, but the work experience complemented what I learned in school.

Students these days have a chance to learn while helping fellow students discover new creative power. Check this out:

What you’ll get:

  • Serious résumé building, featuring hands-on marketing, event planning, and social media experience with one of the world’s top brands
  • Opportunities to develop relationships with campus leaders and expand your network
  • Adobe swag and performance-based incentives
  • Complimentary Creative Cloud membership
  • Top reps will be eligible for additional incentives such as gift cards, portfolio reviews, and features on Adobe Students’ social channels

The ideal Adobe Student Rep:

  • Is creative and entrepreneurial, with strong online and offline social networks
  • Has a deep knowledge of and passion for Adobe creative applications
  • Is able to work independently to meet deadlines and reporting requirements

General responsibilities include:

  • Planning and executing at least one Adobe product training workshop
  • Promoting workshops through word-of-mouth marketing 
  • Forming partnerships with relevant campus organizations
  • Social media support and amplification

You can apply here. [Update: Evidently the program only exists in the US right now.]

10:30 PM | Permalink | Comments [1]

Short film: “Mountains in Motion”

Gorgeous time lapses (just don’t be put off by the opening minute or two of narration from the lost Mumford son):

Mountains in Motion: The Canadian Rockies is an award-winning short film documenting the life of the alpine landscape through time-lapse photography. In an effort to highlight the wildness of these mountain places and how they have inspired explorers of the past, present and future, time-lapse sequences were patiently gathered from exposed summits, by glacial lakes, and under aurora-filled skies.

Hours and even months of change lapses in a matter of seconds, providing the viewer with a rare insight into the ever-changing nature of the landscape. Weaving throughout the film are reflections of an early mountaineer, who is deeply moved by his own encounter with the mountains and the revelations of explorers who have come before him. “What is this power that lures me upwards, into the unknown,” he wonders, “that pulls me deeper, despite snow, wind and exhaustion?”

Made on a shoestring budget and with entirely volunteer hours, the film brought together artists from two vastly different parts of North America – Banff, Alberta, and Atlanta, Georgia. Strangers at the start, the film team developed strong friendships over the course of production and were united by their common goal of capturing the beauty and essence of a place that inspires them every day.

This 100% human-powered film combines advanced time-lapse photography with an original story and musical score to bring the landscape center-stage and offers a thrilling new perspective that re-establishes the Canadian Rockies among the finest mountains in the world.

[Vimeo]

3:51 PM | Permalink | No Comments

Photoshop talks with a Space Oddity

Col. Chris Hadfield—Space Station commander, orbital Bowie-player, high-tweeting photographer, and more—recently sat down with Photoshop’s Lex van den Berghe for an interesting & varied chat. As you’d expect they nerd out a bit about photography & touch on some interesting details—for instance:

“We keep about eight cameras in the main viewing module—or ‘cupola.’” Hadfield explained. “There are so many high-energy protons coming through the station—things that are usually absorbed by our atmosphere—that they destroy the camera sensor. Pixels start dropping out immediately. On some of my lower light pictures you can see the flaws in the imagery.”

Lex noted later, “Chris was THE MAN… super fun to talk to…fascinating. Killed me that we only had 60 minutes to chat… I could’ve spent all day talking to him, especially if cold beers were also involved.”

8:03 AM | Permalink | Comments [1]
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