November 28, 2012

CTRL+Console: iPad control for Lightroom & Premiere Pro

Check out Jeff Chow’s (now funded) Kickstarter project:

What do you think? It’s great-looking, but I remain a bit skeptical about using touchscreens (which obviously lack the physical variation of a keyboard or dedicated hardware controller) in this way. If you’re a Photoshop user with an iPad, are you using Adobe Nav–and if not, why not? I suspect the problem is that one has to keep glancing over at a touch screen, whereas one can navigate a keyboard (or physical jog wheel, etc.) simply by feel. Yet the concept remains alluring, so I’m curious about others’ assessment.

[Via James Cox]

2:53 PM | Permalink | Comments [3]

July 13, 2012

New demo of the Leap motion tracker

Can. Not. Wait.

Check out more info from the MIT Technology Review, and from the product site.

[Via Mausoom Sarkar]

9:09 AM | Permalink | Comments [6]

July 11, 2012

Wacom Cintiq goes multitouch

Lust-worthy:

I can’t wait to see what Adobe tools can do with multitouch plus a super high precision stylus that pays attention to pressure, tilt, and rotation.

This bad boy costs $3699 and will be available in early August.

10:44 AM | Permalink | Comments [14]

June 02, 2012

(T)ether: A spatially-aware system for animation & annotation

Hey, it’s the return of my (not at all) beloved Nintendo Power Glove!

Cynical take: “Oh, you were bitching that UIs requiring you to lift your hands & touch a screen would make you tired? Wait’ll you have to hold up an iPad in one hand just so you can re-create Lawnmower Man! You’ll be built like Jeff Fahey in no time, tuffy!”

Actual take: Cool!

Check out the project site for more info.

[Via Dave Simons]

8:22 AM | Permalink | Comments [1]

May 25, 2012

Touching—sort of—across time & space

In high school I had my first long-distance girlfriend. My dad would roll his eyes at our pre-Net attempts to connect. “Oh, you’re probably eating a cheese sandwich as 6pm, because Jeanne said she’d eat a cheese sandwich at 6pm…”  He was kidding (and wrong), but there’s much to be said for synchronicity across space.

Enter Marco Triverio’s concept “Feel Me.” As Fast Company puts it,

When a friend is typing, you can see where they’re touching on your own screen. And when your fingers match up, from halfway across the world, haptic feedback can allow you to serendipitously touch. In a text-me-later culture, Feel Me enables communication that’s transient and visceral.

I think it’s rather brilliant. And as for Jeanne, sometimes I now see her across space, hobnobbing with Mitt Romney. Funny old world.

8:08 AM | Permalink | No Comments

May 23, 2012

LEAP Motion promises object-tracking UI breakthroughs

If this thing ($70?!) works even remotely as advertised, we’re in for an exciting future:

[Reader Pierre-Etienne Courtejoie quips, "I just shudder about the possible single-finger gestures to force quit software." (Hmm, seems very John Gruber-positive.)]

10:33 AM | Permalink | Comments [13]

February 16, 2012

Turn any rigid surface into a multitouch UI

Ehhh, what? But yes, it’s apparently real. Read more here.

[Via]

8:38 AM | Permalink | No Comments

December 04, 2011

An enormous multitouch display with stylus input

Jeff Han & Perceptive Pixel blew everyone’s minds with their multitouch demo a year before the iPhone debuted. Six (!) years later he demonstrates their 82″ (!!) multitouch display featuring pen input:

Here’s hoping we see more pen-enabled goodness & lay that “If you see a stylus, it means they blew it” dogma to rest. [Via]

9:09 AM | Permalink | Comments [6]

October 18, 2011

iOS 5 for tots: Quick pro/con

I want Robert Shaw from Jaws to describe my morning as he would a shark attack: “Up comes a reminder on the iPad and the Netflix stops streamin’, and then… ah then you hear that terrible high-pitched screamin’…” Yeah, it got ugly. (Sorry, other conference call participants.)

Good news, though: You can now go into Settings->Notifications, find the Calendar app, and set the notification type from Alert (which interrupts the video) to Banner.  Now our guys can watch their morning Mighty Machines without going ballistic when it pauses.

On the downside, here’s an intriguing little bit of usability research: Finn is often generating four-finger “swipes” (new in iOS 5 for switching apps) when simply trying to drag on the screen. While coloring in lines in the aforementioned Harold, he’d push hard and his little knuckles would register as multitouch swipes.  Thus he’d start switching apps, bringing up the list of apps, etc.  Who knew?

As always, I pine for Apple to introduce multi-user support in iOS.  Now in the kids’ profile I’ll add “disabling global swipe gestures” to “making it harder to exit the app via the Home button,” “disallow scary stuff on YouTube,” etc.

Update: Double who-knew: BubCap home button covers “are just rigid enough to keep toddlers from pressing the home button, yet flexible enough that adults can activate the button with a firm push.” [Via Iván Cavero Belaunde]

2:43 PM | Permalink | Comments [5]

October 14, 2011

New Wacom tablets add wireless, multitouch

The new Capture ($100) and Create ($200) models offer multitouch input, and you can add wireless connectivity for an extra $40. Neat. (And those prices are quite a deal, considering that they include a copy of Photoshop Elements.)

[Via]

8:00 AM | Permalink | No Comments

October 10, 2011

Use multitouch gestures to prototype a design

Adobe Proto captures, I think, the real spirit of tablets: be fun, fresh, immediate, and playful. Here’s a demo from PM Devin Fernandez:

Like Photoshop Touch, it’s coming soon for Android & iOS.

9:26 AM | Permalink | Comments [6]

October 03, 2011

Introducing Photoshop Touch

Combine, Edit, Share. I’m delighted to introduce Adobe Photoshop Touch, a new tablet app for creative imaging. With PS Touch we’re bringing Photoshop fun & power not only to new platforms, but to a whole new audience.

Here’s my brief overview:

To see the app in action, check out Russell Brown’s 10-minute feature tour:

So, when can you get it, and what does it cost?

We plan to release Photoshop Touch for Android shortly, after which we plan to bring it to iOS. When we talk about reaching new audiences, we’re not kidding: Photoshop Touch is priced at just $9.99.

So (to anticipate an inevitable question), why Android first? Many Adobe apps (Adobe Carousel, Ideas, Photoshop Express, Eazel, Color Lava, Nav) have already been released on iOS first, and it’s good to support customers across platforms. We’re busily coding for iOS as well, so I wouldn’t make too much of this particular detail. No matter what tablet(s) you use, we can’t wait to get Photoshop Touch into your hands.

One last thought for now: We’re still very, very early in the evolution of mobile devices for creative work, and Photoshop Touch–along with the many other Adobe touch apps announced today–is just a beginning. We’re eager to hear what you think, and I’m looking forward to hearing ideas & questions here and on Twitter (@PhotoshopTouch). (Today I’ll be largely offline, showing the app in person at Adobe MAX, so I apologize in advance if I’m slow to respond.)

11:10 AM | Permalink | Comments [36]

June 11, 2011

Beautiful Kinect Graffiti

Jean-Christophe Naour uses the motion-sensing gaming platform to paint with light, using his whole body:

[Via]

I’ve had a somewhat similar idea: use the gyroscope a smartphone (or multiple phones) to capture a person’s gestures in space, then use the resulting paths to do 3D painting & animation. That work could happen on the phone itself, or the paths could be imported into After Effects & other apps (think MotionSketch.next.), or even run interactively in Flash, WebGL, etc. Maybe the idea’s too esoteric to have legs, but I’d love to see it tried.

8:08 AM | Permalink | Comments [1]

April 22, 2011

Do-it-yourself huge multitouch

Is it or is it not a great time to be alive?

Check out Seth’s site for more info. [Via]

8:08 AM | Permalink | Comments [2]

June 28, 2010

Huge multitouch wall at the World’s Fair

The Wall of Chile  at the 2010 Shanghai World’s Fair features a 4-by-1.2 meter (13-by-4 foot) display wall that enables visitors to access more than six hours of high-definition video and thousands of photographs.


Here are more info & more projects from the creators.

2:54 PM | Permalink | Comments [3]

November 19, 2009

Interesting multitouch ideas: 10/GUI & BumpTop

Speaking of multitouch, the folks at 10/GUI have some interesting ideas on how to make multitouch practical on the desktop. If nothing else the ergonomic observations are spot on.

[Via]
Then there’s BumpTop, which has been around for a few years & which is now available for download. It’s cool, but as I’ve written previously, I have a hard time imagining it’ll get widely adopted. Here’s the demo:

[Via]

11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments [9]

November 17, 2009

Multitouch comes to Flash

I’ve gotten quite a few inquiries over the years asking when Flash Player would support multitouch inputs. The answer: right now! Here’s a quick video demo:

For more info on multitouch, hardware decoding, etc., check out these interviews with the FP engineers. [Via]

4:29 PM | Permalink | Comments [9]

August 18, 2009

Vector graphics software… from 1963

JFK was in office, and yet the app Sketchpad (from then-25-year-old Ivan Sutherland) offered multitouch input, auto-correction of vector strokes, and even reusable symbols (a la Flash, Illustrator, etc.). Very cool:

Apparently Dr. Sutherland once employed–you guessed it–John Warnock, seen here introducing Adobe Illustrator in 1987. [Via]

7:02 AM | Permalink | Comments [8]

August 17, 2009

Cool interface demos o’ the day

  • SLAP Widgets are “real live plastic and silicone objects that are used in conjunction with a multi-touch table to allow users to control interface values through physical push buttons, sliders, knobs, keypads and keyboards.” Here’s a very cool (albeit slow-loading) video of the system in action*. (Can Slap Chop integration be far behind?)
  • Fontplore is “an interactive application designed for searching and exploring font databases… It does all that on an interactive table, using tangible objects to navigate and control actions.” The site includes a brief video demo.

I keep wanting to see great font exploration & management built into Adobe apps. TypeDNA offers a cool Photoshop-plug-in, using optical character recognition to determine a given font’s name, suggesting font harmonies, and more. I’d like to see these concepts taken even farther, offering browsing, comparison, activation, and purchase in all Suite apps via Flash panels.

* Who knew that Frustrated Total Internal Reflection is a multitouch technology & not just the story of my teenage years (okay, most of my years).

7:05 AM | Permalink | Comments [1]

April 24, 2009

Multitouch coolness o’ the day: WiiSpray.com

I don’t have a lot of background on the project, but WiiSpray.com–using a Nintendo Wii controller + Flash to enable collaborative graffiti painting–caught my eye:

The site is light on info, but you can see a few photos of the spray can controller. I particularly like the idea of controlling a stencil with one hand while spraying paint with the other.
Previously in a similar vein:

10:39 AM | Permalink | Comments [1]

February 25, 2009

Optional plug-in disables trackpad rotation

During the CS4 development cycle, the Photoshop and Bridge teams worked closely with Apple* to support the multitouch gestures supported on MacBook Air and newer MacBook Pro systems.  As a result you can zoom and rotate documents using three-finger combinations.

 

The rub is that especially on the latest systems (with the enormous trackpads), it can be too easy to zoom or rotate accidentally.  Unfortunately Photoshop doesn’t ship with a preference that would govern the behavior.  Therefore we’ve released an optional plug-in that will disable zooming and rotating via the keyboard if you’d like.  Just drop it into your Plug-Ins folder, restart Photoshop, and you’ll be set.

 

* Next time you hear someone start in with a bunch of “Adobe doesn’t care about the Mac” crap, I’d like you to think of this.  People here go the extra mile because they do care.  Deeply.

2:47 PM | Permalink | Comments [36]

May 16, 2008

Flash-based multitouch coolness

Christian Moore & the folks at the NUI Group have created Lux, an open-source framework for creating multitouch-savvy applications.  Check out the video demo & a short interview with Christian on how they’ve used Flash to prototype a very cool implementation.  I’d love to see it updated to take advantage of the GPU hardware acceleration in the upcoming Flash Player 10 (just posted in preview form on Adobe Labs).  Oh, and how about this running in a Smart Object on the Photoshop canvas?  (Hey, I’m just thinking aloud, not dropping any near-term.) [Via Jerry Harris]

 

Interesting related bits:

  • Gizmodo features a short recent interview with Jeff Han, the guy whose multitouch work really lit a fire under the whole area two years ago.
  • Macworld’s Dan Frakes provides a video tour of MultiClutch, a free utility for extending the multitouch features in the latest MacBook Pro & MacBook Air notebooks.  (I was bummed to discover that my wife’s brand new MacBook doesn’t offer the same support.  She’s just happy to have two-finger scrolling, something missing from her deceased PowerBook.)
  • I need to pull together a category for multitouch; in the meantime, past interesting bits are here.
2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments [1]

February 27, 2008

Leather + multitouch = foxy

Ooh, now that’s nice: student Nedzad Mujcinovic has crafted “Livre,” a concept for a leather-wrapped, multitouch-aware electronic book.  Check out the photos as well as the overview.  Could a large e-ink screen, organic materials, gesture-based navigation, and a minimum of button clutter change the game and make e-books widespread?  It would be fun to find out. [Via]

In other cool device news:

  • Small format:
    • Like sketching ideas on cocktail napkins, but wish they were more expensive and susceptible to water damage?  Then perhaps you’d like the Napkin PC.  Naw, the concept is cooler than that–especially if you could combine multiple Napkin PCs into a single work area. [Via Jana Sedivy]
    • Inchworm brings sketching and painting to the Nintendo DS.  It was created by Bob Sabiston, the developer of the “Rotoshop” software used to create Waking Life and A Scanner Darkly. [Via Greg Geisler]
    • Nokia envisions a future full of shape-shifting phones; peep the video for their Morph concept.
  • Multitouch:
  • CNET reports on startup company CeeLite (note: not the singer from Gnarls Barkley) creating flexible sheets of light, useful for wrapping on buses, poles, and other objects.
  • Researchers at Stanford have revealed details on their plenoptic camera work.
  • Alienware offers a cool, curved display for widescreen gaming.  I wonder how well it would work for design & photo editing.
  • Art Lebedev’s Photoshop-savvy Optimus Maximus OLED keyboard (mentioned previously) has started shipping.  You can see it being set up, or you can watch the droll Art himself work his geek-fu on a real live girl. :-)  [Via Jesse Zibble]
8:47 PM | Permalink | Comments [3]

October 13, 2007

Multitouch, holograms, & other next-gen I/O

4:43 PM | Permalink | Comments [2]

July 13, 2007

Interactive Adobe video wall comes to NYC

According to an article in today’s NYT,

Adobe will unveil an interactive wall of projected animation [see video] this morning in Union Square, along the 14th Street side of the Virgin Megastore. As pedestrians walk past the wall, infrared sensors will lock on to the person closest to the wall, who will then be able to control a projected slider button at the bottom of the wall. As the selected pedestrian continues walking and moves the slider along, the wall will start displaying colorful animation and playing music, effects that will grow or recede at the pace that the person advances or retreats.

Measuring 95 square feet, and created by Goodby Silverstein working with animators at Brand New School and video peeps Obscura Digital,
the wall is meant to offer “a single and multiuser experience simultaneously.”  Gizmodo wants to see multitouch interactivity added to the project, saying “Sure, you’d probably wind up with more than a few obscene renderings, but it’s New York, people can handle it.”  (Yes, but could Adobe Corporate*? ;-))

I hope to get photos and videos from the unveiling to share.  If you know of any, please pass ‘em along. [Update: Gothamist has posted a bit more info.]

*Then again, Bruce is from Brooklyn, so I imagine him remaining unfazed.

12:04 PM | Permalink | Comments [2]

July 03, 2007

Multitouch, real & imagined

  • MIT’s Technology Review features multi-touch UI pioneer Jeff Han in a new video.  He talks about ways these screens can get around the "thin straw" of keyboard mouse input; the potential for better storyboarding applications; and more.
  • Mark Coleran has carved out what seems to be a pretty cool gig, designing computer interfaces shown in movies.  His design for a table in The Island resembles the Microsoft Surface concept. [Via]  Mark’s work reminds me of the time we visited the set of one of the CSI shows and met the folks responsible for those Director-powered graphics–you know, the ones that convince average viewers that computers can read The Iliad reflected off the head of a pin.  Thanks a lot for that, guys. ;-)
  • Meanwhile the interface of the iPhone I picked up on Saturday remains a completely imaginary one: thanks to AT&T, I can’t activate the damn thing with my corporate cell number, which means I can’t get past the welcome screen.  Note to self: the whole sequence of
    1. Get all excited, buy lovely, seductive gizmo
    2. Figure out whether said gizmo can actually be used with phone number, work email, etc.

    should actually be reversed.  Gah. This would be that bleeding edge I’ve heard so much about. (It does feel great in one’s hand, however. ;-P)

8:45 AM | Permalink | Comments [6]

June 20, 2007

Multitouch: $2 or $10,000?

The folks at Medallia claim to have devised a multitouch user input device using two dollars’ worth of dye and Ziploc bags.  Hmm–interesting clip, but doesn’t it seem they’ve pretty much mashed up a couple seconds of new footage (producing colored blobs) with chunks of other people’s demos (the chess demo from Tactiva, etc.)?  Beyond the technology, I’m struck by the number of comments below the video that boil down to "hah hah u pwned those fat-cats lolz!!"  Man are there some credulous people in the world. [Via Tom Attix]

Speaking of pwning Microsoft, however, this parody of the recently-announced, $10,000-a-pop Surface project is pretty damn funny.  I can’t wait to get tanked with my friends, using a device the size of a small car. [Via]

11:49 PM | Permalink | Comments [6]

March 15, 2007

Multi-touch photo editing demo

I don’t have much context for this video, but I’m passing it along as it’s an interesting demo of image editing using a multi-touch screen.  The pie menus look useful (is that a Healing Brush icon I see?), though to compete against a keyboard and mouse, I think it would need to be much faster and more fluid.

Sidenote: I like imagining that the choice of bloopy, electro-spacey music may not just be a video editing choice, and that it’s actually emitted by the multi-touch monitors themselves (see also the Jeff Han origin of the genre).  "Hey man, cool screen, but why does it keep playing the pseudo-Moby?"

10:53 AM | Permalink | Comments [9]

January 18, 2007

Multi-touch UI: New video & interview

Jefferson Han is the NYU researcher whose research into multi-touch interfaces–and accompanying super-cool video–exploded onto the Web this time last year.   He’s been on many folks’ brains since last week, when Apple demoed multi-touch features on the forthcoming iPhone.  Now Fast Company has posted a feature on Jeff, along with an new video.  The profile is just a tad breathless ("The scope of the projects he’s involved in is a testament to the sheer wattage of his brain" makes me think there’s a Trapper Keeper with "I [Heart] JH!!!" on it), but it’s fun to learn about a very bright dude with a huge passion for just getting it done.  (Hey, how many 12-year-olds build a laser?)

3:37 PM | Permalink | Comments [5]
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