Author Archive: kmonahan

QuickTime HDV file issues in Premiere Pro CS6 (Windows)

Working with HDV QuickTime files generated on a Mac in a Windows version of Premiere Pro? If so, you may have run into a problem with the video portion of the clip not displaying. This issue is related to Apple not including the HDV component in the Windows version of QuickTime.

If you need to have access to the HDV QuickTime files on your PC, you have a few options:

  • Purchase the Calibrated{Q} XD Decoder for PCs. This allows you to read QuickTime XDCAM and HDV QuickTime video files.
  • Transcode the files to another codec on a Mac
  • Transcode the files to another format using a program like VLC.

Thanks to Walter Soyka for pointing this out.Share on Facebook

Support for growing files in Premiere Pro CS6

Premiere Pro CS6 provides tools for editors working in diverse fields. For example, there are editors that need to handle video files that continuously grow in duration. Growing files are generated at live events, sports, broadcast, and others. These video files are referred to as “growing files.” Premiere Pro CS6 supports growing files for those needing that workflow.

Supported codecs for growing files include:

  • AVCI50/100
  • IMX30/40/50
  • RDD9-compliant XDCAM HD 50/35/25/18
  • QuickTime wrapped reference files in these formats are supported in Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.2), and later

Support for growing files to automatically refresh, and how often they should refresh, is available in Media Preferences. The updated duration can be viewed in the Source Monitor. See Media Preferences for details.

Ingesting or capturing media for growing files can only take place if Premiere Pro can read the volume (Premiere Pro can read footage from a unc path (“//somewhere/something”), but the drive must be mapped (“H:\somewhere\something”). The file can then be imported using the File > Import command.  You can then edit with these clips as you normally would any other clip.

Note: growing files cannot be ingested through the Media Browser.

For growing files support for all current formats, update to Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.2).Share on Facebook

Video Production with Creative Suite 6 by Maxim Jago

Maxim Jago presents a new video tutorial series by video2brain entitled, “Video Production with Creative Suite 6.” In this series, Maxim shows the methods for video post-production by using a number of applications in Creative Suite CS6. More importantly, he shows how the applications interoperate for a smoother workflow.

Although one of the most powerful features of Creative Suite has always been integration, the best way to share work between applications is not really known by most users. In this video tutorial series, Maxim Jago shows you the steps to use the best applications for the task at hand, and then how to integrate that work into other applications for further refinement, or output. If you want to be able to use Adobe Creative Suite CS6 to its ultimate for video post-production, this series can be a great help.

See this page on the video2brain website for full details.

Free Video Tutorials
Introduction to Multi-Application Post-Production
Improving Speech-to-Text Analysis
Preparing Images for Video in Photoshop
Sending Work from Premiere Pro to After Effects
Other topics in the series Related topic in community content or Help
Introduction: An Overview of Dynamic Link and Round-Tripping Adobe Dynamic Link (CS6)
Dynamic Link vs. Round-Tripping About Dynamic Link
One-Way Trips and the Edit Original Command Edit a clip in its original application 
Using Breakdown Report Producing Breakdown Reports for Production and Post
Organizing Projects with Prelude The Prelude workspace
Sharing Prelude Rough Cuts with Premiere Pro Rough cuts
Browsing in Bridge View and manage files in Adobe Bridge 
Batch Renaming with Bridge Automate tasks in Adobe Bridge
Editing Metadata with Bridge Label and rate files 
Preparing Images for Video in Illustrator Preparing and importing Illustrator files
Using Illustrator Files in After Effects Continuously rasterize a layer containing vector graphics
Using Illustrator Files with the Premiere Pro Title Tool Add images to titles
Working with Photoshop Files in After Effects Working with Photoshop and After Effects 
Working with Photoshop Files in Premiere Pro Working with Photoshop and Premiere Pro 
Creating Audio for Video with Audition Working with video applications 
Sending Work from Premiere Pro to Audition Edit audio clips from Adobe Premiere Pro or After Effects
Round-Tripping a Soundtrack from Premiere Pro to Audition Edit audio in Adobe Audition
Preparing Content for Premiere Pro in After Effects Working with Premiere Pro and After Effects 
Preparing Content for After Effects in Premiere Pro Create and link to After Effects compositions with Dynamic Link 
Sending Work from After Effects to Premiere Pro Import an Adobe Premiere Pro project 
Outputting Pre-Graded Shots for the Edit from SpeedGrade Offline editing and grading workflow
Sending Work from Premiere Pro to SpeedGrade Send a sequence to Adobe SpeedGrade CS6 
Share Sequences Between Premiere Pro and Encore with Dynamic Link Adobe Dynamic Link
Sending Work from Premiere Pro to the Media Encoder Workflow and overview for exporting 
Using the Media Encoder to Output from After Effects Add and manage items in the encoding queue 

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Smaller Premiere Pro CS6 trim tool icons

The interface upgrade for Premiere Pro CS6 included an updated look for certain trim tools, including the Selection tool, the Ripple tool, and the Roll tool. For some users, these icons are larger than they would like at certain zoom levels in the Timeline. Some have described that there is too much zooming in and out when performing simple trims because of the larger icons.

DSLR specialist, Philip Bloom feels the trim tools are too large, as well. His friend, “James,” (described as the English “MacGyver”) has created new icons that can be used in place of the existing ones. You can install these tool icons “at your own risk” by following instructions on Philip’s blog entitled, “Little fix to make using Premiere CS6 a little bit better!”

Take a look and see if the replacement icons might work better for your workflow.Share on Facebook

Premiere Pro CS6 video tutorial series by Andrew Devis

Andrew Devis has been very busy, indeed. Already one of the community’s most prolific content creators, Andrew has released a comprehensive Premiere Pro CS6 video tutorial series on the Creative Cow website. Already featuring 75 in-depth video tutorials, the series helps people get started with Premiere Pro CS6, and those that are coming from other applications.

This series is a good introduction to Premiere Pro, and a boon to all those wishing to know more about the application. Thanks to Andrew!

Introduction
Opening Premiere Pro CS6
Project Panel
Playback Controls
Workspaces
Keyboard Short-cuts
Matched Sequences & Bins
Preferences
New Items
Importing Assets
Importing PSDs
Sub-Clips
Timecode & Playhead
Insert & Overwrite Edits
Targeting Tracks
Tools Part 1
Tools Part 2
Tools Part 3: Rate Stretch
Tools Part 4
Trim Monitor
Timeline Trimming
JKL Trimming
Dynamic Trimming
Un-Linking Tracks
Exporting Single Frames
Three & Four Point Editing
Replacing Footage
Track Headers Options
Naming Conventions
Transitions: What, Why, When
Applying Transitions
Audio Transitions
Titles 1: Basic Titles
Titles 2: Formatting Titles
Titles 3: Title Styles
Titles 4: Exporting Titles
Titles 5: Text on Paths
Titles 6: Rolling Titles
Titles 7: Crawling Titles
Titles 8: Creating an Arrow
Project Management
Fixed Effects
Animating Fixed Effects
Picture in Picture Presets
Corner Pin Effect
The Pen Tool
Color 1: Color Correction
Color 2: Color Waveform
Color 3 The Vectorscope
Color 4 RGB Parade
Color 5: Color Cast
Color 6: Output Levels
Color 7: Skin Tones
Color 8: Color Corrector
Color 9: Secondary Color Correction
Color 10: Vignettes 1
Color 11: Vignettes 2
Color 12: Luma Corrector
Color 13: Luma Curve
Color 14: RGB Curves 1
Color 15: RGB Curves 2
Color 16: Levels Effect
Color 17: Day for Night
Color 18: Leave Color Effect
Color 19: Change to Color
Color 20: Blend Modes 1
Color 21: Blend Modes 2: Lens Flare
Color 22: The Filmic Blend Technique
Color 23: Adjustment Layers
Audio 1: Track Types
Audio 2: 5.1 Audio Channel
Audio 3: Clips & Tracks
Audio 4: Clip & Track FX
Audio 5: Some Audio FX
Importing Image SequencesShare on Facebook

Premiere Pro CS5 & CS5.5 Keyboard Shortcuts

For Premiere Pro, the keyboard shortcuts article is typically the most popular page in the Help system. However, when we launched CS6, there were some issues with search engines not finding specific pages that were previously easy to find. The page, Default keyboard shortcuts (CS5 & CS5.5), was unfortunately one of those pages. While we search for a fix, here is a link to the current set of keyboard shortcuts for Premiere Pro CS5 & Premiere Pro CS5.5:

Adobe Premiere Pro (CS5 & CS5.5) keyboard shortcuts

For Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 keyboard shortcuts, see this blog post.Share on Facebook

Premiere Pro CS6 Keyboard Shortcuts

For Premiere Pro, the keyboard shortcuts article is typically the most popular page in the Help system. However, when we launched CS6, there were some issues with search engines not finding specific pages that were previously easy to find. The page, Default keyboard shortcuts in CS6, was unfortunately one of those pages. While we search for a fix, here is a link to the current set of keyboard shortcuts for Premiere Pro CS6:

Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 keyboard shortcuts

For Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 & CS5.5 keyboard shortcuts, see this blog post.Share on Facebook

Free video tutorial samples from “Learning Premiere Pro CS6″

I just reviewed several of the new Premiere Pro CS6 sample video tutorials from Jeff Sengstack and Infinite Skills, and they’re quite good. Entitled, “Learning Premiere Pro CS6,” this series is one of the most in depth training series on Premiere Pro CS6 to date. Over 22 hours of training and 111 lessons are available. Jeff has in depth knowledge about Premiere Pro and his delivery is enjoyable to follow along with. There are 22 free video tutorials from the series available on this page on the Infinite Skills web site, so be sure to check them out.

 

The following subjects are covered in the free tutorials. I’ve added links to corresponding Help topics:

Here are the topics that are covered, and the corresponding topics in Help:

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Creating a reflective floor using After Effects

A common task in After Effects is to create a reflective floor in After Effects. Rob Garrott shows you how to create one with this video tutorial from Lynda.com. This is part of a series called, “Design in Motion.” Check it out!

Other videos in the series:
Creating motion blur in After Effects
Depth of field in C4D and After Effects
Glowing “sci-fi” text in C4D and After Effects

Design in Motion is a series of creative techniques featuring short projects using After Effects and CINEMA 4D. Taught by motion graphics expert Rob Garrott, the course covers how color correction, expressions, rendering type, lighting, and animation are used in each program, and the topics are updated weekly. Using these tips and tricks, motion graphics designers will find designing to be a more efficient process.

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Alternatives to the jog shuttle controls in Premiere Pro CS6

The Premiere Pro CS6 user interface has been vastly improved, with a cleaner look and customizable buttons. In cleaning up the UI, however, there was one casualty: the jog shuttle controls.

We know that a number of our users relied upon the jog shuttle controls for scrubbing through footage, but many more did not. We found this out through research from our Product Improvement Program, the prerelease program, from observing professional editors in action during customer visits and in studios at our office. We observed that more editors used the J-K-L keys to scrub footage, rather than the jog shuttle controls. The obvious benefit of the removal of the controls is that the interface looks much cleaner.

We were aware, though, that a sample of our users might be upset if we removed them. To those users, we apologize. The alternative is to use the J-K-L keys to scrub footage. The use of these keys imitates the jog shuttle controls closely, with the benefit of not having to use the mouse to precisely click a set of controls.

We know that J-K-L scrubbing could be improved. We are aware of the following problems:

  • The high speed scrubbing with JJJJ or LLLL is not fast enough, compared with other NLEs.
  • When scrubbing at high speed, the audio pitch is too high, and therefore not as audible as it could be.
    • Note: You can dial down the audio pitch to be much more audible when scrubbing at high speed.
      • When scrubbing forward with LLLL, press the Shift key, and then press the J key multiple times until audio playback is more audible.
      • When scrubbing backward with JJJJ, press the Shift key, and then press the L key multiple times until audio playback is more audible.
    • Press Shift + L to play forward slowly. Continue to press the L key until the pitch and speed is satisfactory.
    • Press Shift + J to play backward slowly. Continue to press the J key until the pitch and speed is satisfactory.

See this video by Maxim Jago for a good explanation of how to use the J-K-L keys:

For information about how to operate J-K-L scrubbing, see this page in Premiere Pro Help.

Some users report that third-party hardware, such as, the Countour Shuttle works as a suitable replacement for the jog/shuttle controls.

If you can think of any other improvements, please file them as a feature request here: http://www.adobe.com/go/wish.Share on Facebook