Posts tagged "Editing"

Saving an effect or multiple effects as a preset in Premiere Pro

About presets

Are you an effects junkie? I am. One thing I often do is create preset effects to help speed up my workflow. You create an effects preset with an effect or group of effects to create a specific visual treatment to a video clip. In the Effects panel, open the Presets bin and note the stock presets that come with the program.

Sure, you can save a single effect as a preset, I do it all the time. However, I often use combinations of multiple effects to achieve a certain result. Can combinations of effects be saved as a single preset in Premiere Pro? The answer is, “yes, you can.” Let’s first see how to create a simple effects preset, then work into making a preset containing multiple effects.

Saving a preset

Screen Shot 2013-09-03 at 3.01.38 PMTo save a single effect as a preset, do the following:

  1. Add any effect to a clip in the Timeline by doing one of the following.
    • Drag and drop an effect from the Effects panel to a clip.
    • Select the clip and then double-click an effect in the Effects panel.
  2. Open the clip in the Effect Controls panel by double-clicking the clip.
  3. Adjust any controls to achieve the desired results viewed in the Program Monitor.
  4. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) directly on the effect.
  5. Choose > Save Preset.
  6. In the Save Preset dialog box, name the preset. Add a description, if desired.
  7. Click OK.
  8. The preset is now available in the Presets bin in the Effects panel.

Screen Shot 2013-09-03 at 3.01.55 PMTo save multiple effects as a preset, do the following:

  1. Add effects to a clip in the Timeline, as outlined previously.
  2. Open the clip in the Effect Controls panel by double-clicking the clip.
  3. Adjust controls for each effect to achieve the desired results viewed in the Program Monitor.
    • Drag the effect to a different place in the stack of effects, if necessary.
    • Readjust controls, if necessary.
  4. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) on any of the effects.
  5. Choose > Save Preset.
  6. In the Save Preset dialog box, name the preset. Add a description, if desired.
  7. Click OK.
  8. The preset is now available in the Presets bin in the Effects panel.

Now, you have a preset that you can apply to any clip or group of clips you like.

Drag and drop the effects preset, or select the clip and then double click the preset to apply it.

More about presets

Note that you do not need to worry about the alpha-numeric order of multiple effects, they remain in the same order that you saved them. Also keep in mind that this preset will be saved in the Presets bin for every project you do in Premiere Pro, not just the current project.

Details about effect presets are found here in the help documentation.

Here is a video tutorial about presets:

Enjoy creating your collection of preset effects!

Share on Facebook

The State of DSLR Video Editing

Rich Harrington on the Planet 5D podcast

Rich Harrington on the Planet 5D podcast

Premiere Pro and After Effects trainer, editor and author Richard Harrington, recently had the chance to be a guest on the Planet 5D podcast. He talked about the state of the art in editing HDSLR footage and more. Worth checking out.

Watch for free here.

podcast #52 Richard Harrington from planetMitch on Vimeo.


Original link is here:
Share on Facebook

Keyboard shortcuts: selecting and toggling panels

Use keyboard shortcuts to select the panel you need.

Use keyboard shortcuts to select the panel you need.

While helping users on the Creative Cow Premiere Pro forum the other day, I happened upon a request by a user who wanted to toggle the sequence tabs in the timeline with a keyboard shortcut like he could with Apple Final Cut Pro. At first, I looked all over the manual for such a shortcut but could not find one. The closest thing was to toggle the different windows to the right and to the left. Not exactly what the user wanted!

UPDATE July 2013: Premiere Pro CC now has a keyboard shortcut for toggling Source and Record monitors.

I then turned to the Premiere Pro engineering staff and was enlightened. I found out that you can toggle tabs in both the Source and Timeline panels by first choosing the shortcut for focusing on that panel, and then repeating the shortcut to toggle to a new sequence or clip.

For example, if you press Shift-3, you will be focused on the timeline panel. By pressing Shift-3 once more, it will toggle to the next open sequence (if multiple sequences are open). Toggle Shift-4 for the Program panel and it works the same way. Pretty cool, eh?

When pressing Shift-2, you’ll be focused on the Source panel. If you have multiple clips loaded into the Source panel, by pressing Shift-2 again, it will toggle to the next clip that you previously loaded. A nice tip is to drag and drop multiple clips into the Source panel all at once. There, they are loaded and ready to be toggled to in an instant.

In other cases, you will need to know the keyboard shortcut to open a specific panel, rather than toggle to it. Here are some handy shortcuts to know, so you can get where you want quickly by using a shortcut.

  • Project Panel: Shift-1
  • Effects Controls Panel: Shift-5
  • Audio Mixer: Shift-6
  • Effects Panel: Shift-7
  • Media Browser Panel: Shift-8
Using keyboard shortcuts to quickly go where you need to can really speed up your workflow. Once you internalize these shortcuts, I’m sure you’ll be editing more smoothly.

Share on Facebook

Video Production with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 & Adobe After Effects CS5.5

Video Production with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and After Effects CS5.5: Learn by Video From Script to Screen with CS5.5

Video Production with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and After Effects CS5.5: Learn by Video From Script to Screen with CS5.5

A new video course from our friends at Learn By Video and Video2Brain has just been released. This video series focuses on the script to screen workflow using Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and Adobe After Effects CS5.5. It’s called, “Video Production with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and After Effects CS5.5: Learn by Video. From Script to Screen with CS5.5.”

Hosted by Maxim Jago (Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5Adobe Premiere Pro CS5: Learn by VideoPremiere Pro CS5 for Avid Editors, and more), this package contains over 8 hours of in-depth training. Maxim shows you how to start a project with Adobe Story, and then import the script into Premiere Pro. After the story is rough cut, add titles and effects with Photoshop and After Effects. Finally, export your production via Adobe Media Encoder to create video files for the web or media files for Adobe Encore. In Encore, you can author a Web DVD, DVD or Blu-ray disc.

Integration between creative applications is the key to a smooth post-production workflow, and that’s what these videos are all about. That’s why I like this training series so much. Here are some excerpts to show the kinds of things you’ll learn:

Meeting the Brief
New Media Features in Premiere Pro
Producing Breakdown Reports for Production and Post
Using Label Colors to Manage Media
Shortcuts to Cut Out Unwanted Media
Creating 2D Titles
Using Text Animation Presets
Preparing Your Premiere Pro Project for the Adobe Media EncoderShare on Facebook

Mouse Scroll Wheel Behavior in Adobe Premiere Pro

The scroll wheel on the mouse can be useful to speeding up workflow in Premiere Pro, that is, if you know how to use it. This is especially true if you are switching to Premiere Pro from another application. For example, Final Cut Pro editors are used to using the scroll wheel to move the timeline vertically to see more tracks. In Premiere Pro, the scroll wheel moves the timeline horizontally. This may seem disorienting at first, but you should know that you can use the mouse to scroll vertically. To do this, hover the pointer over the scroll bars in the timeline, then use the scroll wheel on the mouse to move the timeline vertically.

The scroll wheel has an additional function, and that is zooming in and out of the timeline. Sure you can type the = and – keys to zoom into and out of the timeline, but if you hold down ALT (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and scroll with your mouse you can zoom in and out that way. Scrolling down with the modifier key enabled zooms out of the timeline while scrolling up zooms in.

Just a couple of tips for your scroll wheel that should save you time as you manipulate the timeline in Premiere Pro.Share on Facebook

Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro (CS4, CS5, CS5.5, CS6, & CC)

Welcome to Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro. Whether you’re brand new to editing, have some experience with Premiere Pro, or are coming from another editing application, you’ll need good information in order to be successful. I’ve selected specific high-quality articles and video tutorials so that you’ll have the material to be successful in your efforts.

If you are new to Premiere Pro but are not new to editing, please see the page, “Premiere Pro overview documents for Final Cut Pro and Avid Media Composer Users” for resources to get you started editing quickly. Beginners should go through the material that follows.

1. Overview
Watch this video overview, you’ll learn the basic workflow in Adobe Premiere Pro: import, edit and export. If you are confused about the terminology in the video, check out this online glossary of video terms.

Then, read this page describing basic workflow in Adobe Premiere Pro. Although some of the information is repeated from the video, there are additional links to resources for more information (note that the steps describing Adobe Story and Adobe On Location are optional). More info about basic workflow is in this video.

2. Start editing
Go through the steps in the following tutorial. By doing so, you’ll have the basic building blocks of editing under your belt and be able to create a simple movie. More information can be found in this video tutorial.

3. The fundamentals
Now that you have a basic understanding of the workflow, and have created a simple movie, you’re ready to learn more about the fundamentals of working with Adobe Premiere Pro. First, go through the steps in this tutorial to reinforce what you’ve already learned. Then, learn more about editing technique in this video tutorial.

4. Tutorials about the details
Now that you’ve got some experience with Premiere Pro, you’ll want to check out other tutorials that will give you more training with the basics. For Premiere Pro CS5 & CS5.5, see these videos on AdobeTV, and Creative Cow. See these videos on Adobe TV and Creative Cow to get you up to speed on further details about Premiere Pro CS6 tools and workflow. There is also a free video seminar to assist you in learning Premiere Pro called, “Edit your way faster with Premiere Pro CS6″ with Al Mooney.

There are also materials that you can purchase to further your learning about Premiere Pro. I think that the following resources are the best out there.

If you are coming from a different editing application, like Apple Final Cut Pro or Avid Media Composer, see the materials on this page.

5. Edit more creatively and skillfully using the tools
Now that you’ve got the fundamentals under your belt, create new videos that have more elements than your cuts-only video. For example, add a title, transition or soundtrack to the video. Try techniques that may have been brought up in the tutorials, or try new things by consulting Help. In Help, you can enter terms in the upper left corner of the page. By searching this way, you’ll be using the custom search engine for Adobe Premiere Pro Community Help. If you get stuck, you can always come to the Premiere Pro user-to-user forum.

6. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
While you’re still starting out, you may run into trouble. Before that happens, I recommend that you read through the list of FAQs first. The list of FAQs is located at the top of the Premiere Pro user-to-user forum. You’ll see a drop down menu of FAQs. Simply select the topic you want, and then click the Go button.

If you are interested in getting started with Adobe After Effects, see this post on the After Effects Region of Interest blog.Share on Facebook

Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Information: Articles and Tutorials

It’s finally out! Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 was announced recently, and there is already a good deal of articles and videos that were released in support it. Take a look at each of these links for more info on your favorite Creative Suite Application.

Adobe Blogs
After Effects Region of Interest: After Effects CS5.5: What’s New and Changed
After Effects Region of Interest: Warp Stabilizer in After Effects CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: After Effects CS5.5 Integration with Audition CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: Source Timecode and other Timecode Features in After Effects CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: Improved Trial Version for After Effects CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: Stereoscopic 3D in After Effects CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: Camera Lens Blur Effect and Camera Depth of Field Properties in After Effects CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: Save a Project from After Effects CS5.5 for After Effects
After Effects Region of Interest: Light Falloff in After Effects CS5.5

Premiere Pro Work Area: Premiere Pro CS5.5: What’s New and Changed
Premiere Pro Work Area: Media Encoder CS5.5: What’s New and Changed
Premiere Pro Work Area: Merge Clips and Dual-System Sound in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Premiere Pro Work Area: Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 Integration with Audition CS5.5
Premiere Pro Work Area: Closed Captions in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Premiere Pro Work Area: Improved Trial Version for Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Premiere Pro Work Area: Unified Audio Effects in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Premiere Pro Work Area: Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 Improvements in CUDA processing and the Mercury Playback Engine
Premiere Pro Work Area: Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 Integration with Adobe Story

Adobe TV
Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Production Premium Feature Tour Overview
Greater Performance Gains with the Mercury Playback Engine in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
A Smoother Editing Workflow with Dual-System Sound Support in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Control Light Intensity Falloff with the Light Falloff Effect in After Effects CS5.5
Stabilize Shaky Footage with the Warp Stabilizer in After Effects CS5.5
Create Soft-Focus Effects with the Camera Lens Blur Feature in After Effects CS5.5
What’s New in Audition CS5.5
Experience an Integrated Audio-For-Video Workflow
Get Direct Integration with Adobe Story and Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Improved 64-Bit Adobe Media Encoder in Premiere Pro CS5.5
CS Subscription Overview
Camera Lens Blur in AE CS5.5
Dude, Where’s My Task? Soundbooth vs. Audition
Premiere Pro to Audition
Nested Mercury CUDA
Media Encoder 5.5 on the Z800
Adobe Story: An Introduction
Adobe Story: Collaborating with Co-Authors
CS Review: Integration with Adobe Premiere Pro
Production Workflow Using Metadata
Adobe and Gareth Edwards (Warp Stabilizer)
AE CS5.5: New Creative Techniques Introduction
AE CS5.5: Warp Stabilizer Instant Gratification
AE CS5.5: Warp Stabilizer Basic Parameters
AE CS5.5: Warp Stabilizer Advanced Parameters
AE CS5.5: Outsmarting the Warp Stabilizer
AE CS5.5: Enhancements including Light Falloff
AE CS5.5: Camera Depth of Field Parameters
AE CS5.5: Camera Depth of Field Utilities
AE CS5.5: Orbit Camera Rigs
AE CS5.5: Camera Lens Blur Effect
AE CS5.5: The New Stereoscopic 3D Camera Rig
AE CS5.5: Stereo 3D Controls
AE CS5.5: Stereo 3D Glasses Effect
AE CS5.5: 3D Focus and Stereoscopic Convergence
AE CS5.5: The After Effects/Audition Workflow
AE CS5.5: Advanced Audition for After Effects
AE CS5.5: Edit This/Look at That
AE CS5.5: Searching and Sorting
AE CS5.5: Source Timecode
AE CS5.5: Enhanced Caching
AE CS5.5: Expression Enhancements
AE CS5.5: Save Project as After Effects CS5
AE CS5.5: New Creative Techniques Conclusion

Adobe.com
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Production Premium
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Features
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 System Requirements
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Reviews
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 FAQ
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Showcase
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Extensibility (RED + plug-ins)
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Buying Guide + Subscriptions

Pro Video Coalition
After Effects CS5.5 by Trish and Chris Meyer
Updated: Adobe Warp Stabilizer (P)review by Chris Meyer
After Effects CS5.5 In Production by Mark Christiansen
Adobe Premiere Pro Hits 5.5 by Scott Simmons
AE CS5.5: New Creative Techniques Introduction by Rich Young
What’s New in Adobe Audition by Rich Young
Creative Suite 5.5 Production Premium by Rich Young
Camera Lens Blur in CS5.5 by Rich Young
Production Premium CS5.5 Storms Onto the Scene by Adobe

Studio Daily
Adobe Announces Creative Suite CS5.5 by Bryant Frazier

Vimeo
Warp Stabilizer Effect, New in After Effects CS5.5 by Richard Harrington

RED User
Some Details about RED Improvements in CS5.5Share on Facebook

Free Sample Video Tutorials from Adobe Premiere Pro CS5: Learn by Video

Thanks to the kind folks at Peachpit Press and Video2Brain, new video tutorial samples are now available for Adobe Premiere Pro CS5: Learn By Video. Hosted by Maxim Jago and Jan Ozer, these are high quality tutorials that are designed to help you get started with learning Adobe Premiere Pro CS5. Included is over 15 hours of video training. The book and the DVD provide an overview of Premiere Pro so that beginners can more easily move to the intermediate level.

Here’s a list of the free sample videos (in bold), with links to pages in Premiere Pro Help and related documents and videos for more details on each topic.

Welcome to Premiere Pro

Overview of the Premiere Pro Interface
Help: User Interface

Get Editing
Help: Editing Sequences and Clips
Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 Classroom in a Book: Creating Cuts-Only Vides in Adobe Premiere Pro
Help: Basic Workflow
Help: Create a Project
Video2Brain, Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5: Starting up and Creating a Project
Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 Classroom in a Book: Getting to Know Your Workspace

Track Patching
Help: Work with Tracks
Help: Targeting Tracks

3-Point Edits
Help: Make Three-point and Four-point Edits
Help: Set or Remove Sequence In and Out Points
Help: Adding Clips to Sequences

Interpreting and Replacing Footage
Help: Modifying Clip Properties with Interpret Footage
Help: Replace the Source Footage for a Clip

Adding Motion to Clips
Help: Effects
Help: Motion: Position, Scale, and Rotate a Clip

Creating and Editing Titles
Help: Create New Titles
Help: Titling and the Titler

Exposure and Color Correction
Help: Color Correction and Adjustment
Help: Set Up a Color Correction Workspace
Help: Color Correction Effects
Help: Apply the Color Correction Effects
Help: Adjust Color Balance and Saturation
AdobeTV: Correcting Color
AdobeTV: Basic Use of the 3-Way Color Corrector

Leave Color and Change to Color Effects
Help: Leave Color Effect
Creative Cow: How to Use the Leave Color Effect
Help: Change to Color Effect

Introduction to Compositing
Help: Compositing, Alpha Channels, and Adjusting Clip Opacity
Help: Track Matte Key Effect
Premiere Pro Work Area Blog: Exporting Video with an Alpha Channel (Transparency)

Creating Slideshows and Using Greenscreen
Help: Adding Clips to a Sequence Automatically
Help: Chromakey with the Ultra Key Effect
Help: Keying Effects

Combining Layers via Blending
Help: Blending Modes
Creative Cow: Blending Modes

Nesting Sequences
Help: Nest Sequences
Video2Brain, Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5: Nesting, Auto-Nesting, and Working with Nested Sequences

Encore: Checking Your Project
Help: Testing Encore Projects

(Note: The size of the image in these free sample movies is much smaller than that of the full version on the DVD, so the text in some UI items in the free sample videos is sometimes hard to read. Also, the free sample videos don’t include the source files that are included with the DVD, so you’ll need to use your own assets to follow along.)Share on Facebook

Using the Extend Edit Function in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 & CS5.5

The extend edit function is available in most mature non-linear editing programs and Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 and CS5.5 is no exception. The way an extend edit works is to first place the the current time indicator (CTI) or playhead either before or after an existing edit, engage a keyboard command and then the edit point does a roll trim to the CTI or playhead. To clarify, an extend edit is merely a roll trim that is performed with the playhead and a keyboard shortcut. It’s really a time saving edit function that all should be familiar with.

Achieving an extend edit in Adobe Premiere Pro is very simple, however, you’ll have to customize the keyboard first in order to have access to the function in Premiere Pro CS5 (in Premiere Pro CS5.5, they are already set up for you, so the following steps are unnecessary).

Here’s how to set that up:

  1. Go to Edit > Keyboard Customization
  2. Ensure “Application” is chosen in the drop down menu.
  3. In the Keyboard Customization dialog, scroll down until you see Roll Next Edit to CTI and Roll Previous Edit to CTI.
  4. Select “Roll Previous Edit to CTI” by clicking on the name.
  5. Click once in the Shortcut field next to the command.
  6. Type “E” for extend.
  7. Repeat the process for Roll Next Edit to CTI, except use Shift + E for that command
  8. The Set command for the keyboard will now say [Custom]. You now have a custom set of shortcuts to customize as you see fit, name it by clicking the Save As button and then entering in a name for it.
  9. Click the OK button and the Keyboard Customization window closes.

Now that the keyboard has been properly set up, you’re all ready to go. Follow these steps to complete an extend edit:

  1. In the timeline, target the track(s) that you wish to do an extend edit.
  2. Move the CTI/playhead to a new position either before or after the existing edit point.
  3. Press E to extend an edit forward to the playhead or Press Shift + E to extend an edit backward to the playhead.
  4. Your extend edit is now complete.

This technique is the fastest way in the world to do a roll trim. It works great with audio tracks, as well.

Since we all have a need for a Roll trim in everyday editing practice, I encourage you to map your keyboard right now so that you’ll to be ready to use an extend edit in your next editing session. Doing an extend edit is far faster than reaching for the Rolling Edit tool and then clicking and dragging to make the trim.

Tip: If you target more than one track, the extend edit will function on all of those selected tracks. To see this in action, check out the following example:

Let’s say that I want to do a roll trim to line up the edit points on V2 and Title on V3 with the edit point of the clip on V1. First, I snap the CTI to the existing edit for the clip on V1. Then I select the V2 and V3 video tracks as shown:

Next, type Shift+E to Extend (or Roll) the edit point to where the CTI is positioned.

Note that all three edit points are now aligned quickly and perfectly. If the clip’s edit points are not aligned, one thing may have gone wrong: insufficient handle. An extend edit behaves just like a trim with the Rolling Edit tool and is also subject to the limits of media beyond the chosen in and out points, so be aware of that.

So, there you have it!  A great technique that is used by the pros every day. Because of this function, I rarely use the Rolling Edit tool to make roll edits. It’s just too slow if you know about the extend edit function! I find that the extend edit technique saves me a ton of time in trimming and manipulating edit points of clips, graphics, titles and audio and I hope it will do the same for you.

For more information about the extend edit function, check out this page on Adobe Premiere Pro Help. It’s also described in Help here, as well.

Update Feb. 11, 2011: Karl Soulé has just created a video tutorial for Extend Edit on Adobe TV. Check it out here.Share on Facebook