Posts tagged "motion graphics"

Saving an effect or multiple effects as a preset in Premiere Pro

About presets

Are you an effects junkie? I am. One thing I often do is create preset effects to help speed up my workflow. You create an effects preset with an effect or group of effects to create a specific visual treatment to a video clip. In the Effects panel, open the Presets bin and note the stock presets that come with the program.

Sure, you can save a single effect as a preset, I do it all the time. However, I often use combinations of multiple effects to achieve a certain result. Can combinations of effects be saved as a single preset in Premiere Pro? The answer is, “yes, you can.” Let’s first see how to create a simple effects preset, then work into making a preset containing multiple effects.

Saving a preset

Screen Shot 2013-09-03 at 3.01.38 PMTo save a single effect as a preset, do the following:

  1. Add any effect to a clip in the Timeline by doing one of the following.
    • Drag and drop an effect from the Effects panel to a clip.
    • Select the clip and then double-click an effect in the Effects panel.
  2. Open the clip in the Effect Controls panel by double-clicking the clip.
  3. Adjust any controls to achieve the desired results viewed in the Program Monitor.
  4. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) directly on the effect.
  5. Choose > Save Preset.
  6. In the Save Preset dialog box, name the preset. Add a description, if desired.
  7. Click OK.
  8. The preset is now available in the Presets bin in the Effects panel.

Screen Shot 2013-09-03 at 3.01.55 PMTo save multiple effects as a preset, do the following:

  1. Add effects to a clip in the Timeline, as outlined previously.
  2. Open the clip in the Effect Controls panel by double-clicking the clip.
  3. Adjust controls for each effect to achieve the desired results viewed in the Program Monitor.
    • Drag the effect to a different place in the stack of effects, if necessary.
    • Readjust controls, if necessary.
  4. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) on any of the effects.
  5. Choose > Save Preset.
  6. In the Save Preset dialog box, name the preset. Add a description, if desired.
  7. Click OK.
  8. The preset is now available in the Presets bin in the Effects panel.

Now, you have a preset that you can apply to any clip or group of clips you like.

Drag and drop the effects preset, or select the clip and then double click the preset to apply it.

More about presets

Note that you do not need to worry about the alpha-numeric order of multiple effects, they remain in the same order that you saved them. Also keep in mind that this preset will be saved in the Presets bin for every project you do in Premiere Pro, not just the current project.

Details about effect presets are found here in the help documentation.

Here is a video tutorial about presets:

Enjoy creating your collection of preset effects!

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Creating a reflective floor using After Effects

A common task in After Effects is to create a reflective floor in After Effects. Rob Garrott shows you how to create one with this video tutorial from Lynda.com. This is part of a series called, “Design in Motion.” Check it out!

Other videos in the series:
Creating motion blur in After Effects
Depth of field in C4D and After Effects
Glowing “sci-fi” text in C4D and After Effects

Design in Motion is a series of creative techniques featuring short projects using After Effects and CINEMA 4D. Taught by motion graphics expert Rob Garrott, the course covers how color correction, expressions, rendering type, lighting, and animation are used in each program, and the topics are updated weekly. Using these tips and tricks, motion graphics designers will find designing to be a more efficient process.

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Free After Effects CS5 Tutorials from Lynda.com

Ian Robinson

Recently, the venerable tutorial site, lynda.com, released several free tutorials for creating motion graphics with After Effects CS5. Presented by Ian Robinson, these high quality tutorials should help you learn about such subjects including workflow, using animators with type, and creating storyboards. In this blog, I’ve embedded the videos and provided some related links below each one.

Welcome Video

Workflow for creating motion graphics
Help: Planning your work

Converting type from Photoshop
Help: Convert text from Photoshop to editable text

Using Animators with Type
Help: Examples and resources for text animation
Help: Text animation presets

Creating storyboards in After Effects
Adobe TV: Making Storyboards

Applying the final effects
Help: Keyframe Interpolation
Help: Add randomness to a property with the Wiggler

Thanks to Ian and lynda.com for creating the tutorials. Don’t forget to check ‘em out. Here is a link to all the tutorials and the courseware: After Effects CS5: Creating Motion Graphics. Enjoy!Share on Facebook

After Effects Leftovers, Secrets You May Have Forgotten

If you’ve been using After Effects for a long time, you may have forgotten some of the more useful features over time. If this sounds like you, then have I got an article for you!

Over at Pro Video Coalition’s “Motion Graphics and Visual Effects” section, Chris Zwar has written up a 5 part series called, “After Effects Leftovers”, which features over 40 tips, tricks, workflow suggestions and general reminders about topics like layout, masking, painting, rendering and even the After Effects interface. Along with the articles are helpful videos. Click the links for those at the end of each article. There are corresponding project files that are available from Chris Zwar’s website, as well.

Sounds good? Then hop right over to the series and read all about it in the following locations.

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5

If you have any questions, keep in mind that you can always find info at the After Effects Help Forums or the Manual.Share on Facebook