Posts tagged "tutorials"

Saving an effect or multiple effects as a preset in Premiere Pro

About presets

Are you an effects junkie? I am. One thing I often do is create preset effects to help speed up my workflow. You create an effects preset with an effect or group of effects to create a specific visual treatment to a video clip. In the Effects panel, open the Presets bin and note the stock presets that come with the program.

Sure, you can save a single effect as a preset, I do it all the time. However, I often use combinations of multiple effects to achieve a certain result. Can combinations of effects be saved as a single preset in Premiere Pro? The answer is, “yes, you can.” Let’s first see how to create a simple effects preset, then work into making a preset containing multiple effects.

Saving a preset

Screen Shot 2013-09-03 at 3.01.38 PMTo save a single effect as a preset, do the following:

  1. Add any effect to a clip in the Timeline by doing one of the following.
    • Drag and drop an effect from the Effects panel to a clip.
    • Select the clip and then double-click an effect in the Effects panel.
  2. Open the clip in the Effect Controls panel by double-clicking the clip.
  3. Adjust any controls to achieve the desired results viewed in the Program Monitor.
  4. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) directly on the effect.
  5. Choose > Save Preset.
  6. In the Save Preset dialog box, name the preset. Add a description, if desired.
  7. Click OK.
  8. The preset is now available in the Presets bin in the Effects panel.

Screen Shot 2013-09-03 at 3.01.55 PMTo save multiple effects as a preset, do the following:

  1. Add effects to a clip in the Timeline, as outlined previously.
  2. Open the clip in the Effect Controls panel by double-clicking the clip.
  3. Adjust controls for each effect to achieve the desired results viewed in the Program Monitor.
    • Drag the effect to a different place in the stack of effects, if necessary.
    • Readjust controls, if necessary.
  4. Right-click (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) on any of the effects.
  5. Choose > Save Preset.
  6. In the Save Preset dialog box, name the preset. Add a description, if desired.
  7. Click OK.
  8. The preset is now available in the Presets bin in the Effects panel.

Now, you have a preset that you can apply to any clip or group of clips you like.

Drag and drop the effects preset, or select the clip and then double click the preset to apply it.

More about presets

Note that you do not need to worry about the alpha-numeric order of multiple effects, they remain in the same order that you saved them. Also keep in mind that this preset will be saved in the Presets bin for every project you do in Premiere Pro, not just the current project.

Details about effect presets are found here in the help documentation.

Here is a video tutorial about presets:

Enjoy creating your collection of preset effects!

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Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro (CS4, CS5, CS5.5, CS6, & CC)

Welcome to Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro. Whether you’re brand new to editing, have some experience with Premiere Pro, or are coming from another editing application, you’ll need good information in order to be successful. I’ve selected specific high-quality articles and video tutorials so that you’ll have the material to be successful in your efforts.

If you are new to Premiere Pro but are not new to editing, please see the page, “Premiere Pro overview documents for Final Cut Pro and Avid Media Composer Users” for resources to get you started editing quickly. Beginners should go through the material that follows.

1. Overview
Watch this video overview, you’ll learn the basic workflow in Adobe Premiere Pro: import, edit and export. If you are confused about the terminology in the video, check out this online glossary of video terms.

Then, read this page describing basic workflow in Adobe Premiere Pro. Although some of the information is repeated from the video, there are additional links to resources for more information (note that the steps describing Adobe Story and Adobe On Location are optional). More info about basic workflow is in this video.

2. Start editing
Go through the steps in the following tutorial. By doing so, you’ll have the basic building blocks of editing under your belt and be able to create a simple movie. More information can be found in this video tutorial.

3. The fundamentals
Now that you have a basic understanding of the workflow, and have created a simple movie, you’re ready to learn more about the fundamentals of working with Adobe Premiere Pro. First, go through the steps in this tutorial to reinforce what you’ve already learned. Then, learn more about editing technique in this video tutorial.

4. Tutorials about the details
Now that you’ve got some experience with Premiere Pro, you’ll want to check out other tutorials that will give you more training with the basics. For Premiere Pro CS5 & CS5.5, see these videos on AdobeTV, and Creative Cow. See these videos on Adobe TV and Creative Cow to get you up to speed on further details about Premiere Pro CS6 tools and workflow. There is also a free video seminar to assist you in learning Premiere Pro called, “Edit your way faster with Premiere Pro CS6″ with Al Mooney.

There are also materials that you can purchase to further your learning about Premiere Pro. I think that the following resources are the best out there.

If you are coming from a different editing application, like Apple Final Cut Pro or Avid Media Composer, see the materials on this page.

5. Edit more creatively and skillfully using the tools
Now that you’ve got the fundamentals under your belt, create new videos that have more elements than your cuts-only video. For example, add a title, transition or soundtrack to the video. Try techniques that may have been brought up in the tutorials, or try new things by consulting Help. In Help, you can enter terms in the upper left corner of the page. By searching this way, you’ll be using the custom search engine for Adobe Premiere Pro Community Help. If you get stuck, you can always come to the Premiere Pro user-to-user forum.

6. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
While you’re still starting out, you may run into trouble. Before that happens, I recommend that you read through the list of FAQs first. The list of FAQs is located at the top of the Premiere Pro user-to-user forum. You’ll see a drop down menu of FAQs. Simply select the topic you want, and then click the Go button.

If you are interested in getting started with Adobe After Effects, see this post on the After Effects Region of Interest blog.Share on Facebook

Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Information: Articles and Tutorials

It’s finally out! Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 was announced recently, and there is already a good deal of articles and videos that were released in support it. Take a look at each of these links for more info on your favorite Creative Suite Application.

Adobe Blogs
After Effects Region of Interest: After Effects CS5.5: What’s New and Changed
After Effects Region of Interest: Warp Stabilizer in After Effects CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: After Effects CS5.5 Integration with Audition CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: Source Timecode and other Timecode Features in After Effects CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: Improved Trial Version for After Effects CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: Stereoscopic 3D in After Effects CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: Camera Lens Blur Effect and Camera Depth of Field Properties in After Effects CS5.5
After Effects Region of Interest: Save a Project from After Effects CS5.5 for After Effects
After Effects Region of Interest: Light Falloff in After Effects CS5.5

Premiere Pro Work Area: Premiere Pro CS5.5: What’s New and Changed
Premiere Pro Work Area: Media Encoder CS5.5: What’s New and Changed
Premiere Pro Work Area: Merge Clips and Dual-System Sound in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Premiere Pro Work Area: Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 Integration with Audition CS5.5
Premiere Pro Work Area: Closed Captions in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Premiere Pro Work Area: Improved Trial Version for Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Premiere Pro Work Area: Unified Audio Effects in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Premiere Pro Work Area: Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 Improvements in CUDA processing and the Mercury Playback Engine
Premiere Pro Work Area: Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 Integration with Adobe Story

Adobe TV
Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Production Premium Feature Tour Overview
Greater Performance Gains with the Mercury Playback Engine in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
A Smoother Editing Workflow with Dual-System Sound Support in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Control Light Intensity Falloff with the Light Falloff Effect in After Effects CS5.5
Stabilize Shaky Footage with the Warp Stabilizer in After Effects CS5.5
Create Soft-Focus Effects with the Camera Lens Blur Feature in After Effects CS5.5
What’s New in Audition CS5.5
Experience an Integrated Audio-For-Video Workflow
Get Direct Integration with Adobe Story and Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5
Improved 64-Bit Adobe Media Encoder in Premiere Pro CS5.5
CS Subscription Overview
Camera Lens Blur in AE CS5.5
Dude, Where’s My Task? Soundbooth vs. Audition
Premiere Pro to Audition
Nested Mercury CUDA
Media Encoder 5.5 on the Z800
Adobe Story: An Introduction
Adobe Story: Collaborating with Co-Authors
CS Review: Integration with Adobe Premiere Pro
Production Workflow Using Metadata
Adobe and Gareth Edwards (Warp Stabilizer)
AE CS5.5: New Creative Techniques Introduction
AE CS5.5: Warp Stabilizer Instant Gratification
AE CS5.5: Warp Stabilizer Basic Parameters
AE CS5.5: Warp Stabilizer Advanced Parameters
AE CS5.5: Outsmarting the Warp Stabilizer
AE CS5.5: Enhancements including Light Falloff
AE CS5.5: Camera Depth of Field Parameters
AE CS5.5: Camera Depth of Field Utilities
AE CS5.5: Orbit Camera Rigs
AE CS5.5: Camera Lens Blur Effect
AE CS5.5: The New Stereoscopic 3D Camera Rig
AE CS5.5: Stereo 3D Controls
AE CS5.5: Stereo 3D Glasses Effect
AE CS5.5: 3D Focus and Stereoscopic Convergence
AE CS5.5: The After Effects/Audition Workflow
AE CS5.5: Advanced Audition for After Effects
AE CS5.5: Edit This/Look at That
AE CS5.5: Searching and Sorting
AE CS5.5: Source Timecode
AE CS5.5: Enhanced Caching
AE CS5.5: Expression Enhancements
AE CS5.5: Save Project as After Effects CS5
AE CS5.5: New Creative Techniques Conclusion

Adobe.com
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Production Premium
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Features
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 System Requirements
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Reviews
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 FAQ
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Showcase
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Extensibility (RED + plug-ins)
Adobe Creative Suite CS5.5 Buying Guide + Subscriptions

Pro Video Coalition
After Effects CS5.5 by Trish and Chris Meyer
Updated: Adobe Warp Stabilizer (P)review by Chris Meyer
After Effects CS5.5 In Production by Mark Christiansen
Adobe Premiere Pro Hits 5.5 by Scott Simmons
AE CS5.5: New Creative Techniques Introduction by Rich Young
What’s New in Adobe Audition by Rich Young
Creative Suite 5.5 Production Premium by Rich Young
Camera Lens Blur in CS5.5 by Rich Young
Production Premium CS5.5 Storms Onto the Scene by Adobe

Studio Daily
Adobe Announces Creative Suite CS5.5 by Bryant Frazier

Vimeo
Warp Stabilizer Effect, New in After Effects CS5.5 by Richard Harrington

RED User
Some Details about RED Improvements in CS5.5Share on Facebook

Tutorials for After Effects in Arabic at Qtab.net

Cairo, Egypt: the home of Qtab.net.

Cairo, Egypt: the home of Qtab.net.

After Effects Help is translated into a number of languages for our foreign customers. Unfortunately, it is not possible for us to support every language on the planet. That’s why when we come upon a new resource for foreign language users of After Effects, we like to tell you about it.

Recently, I happened upon a cool After Effects resource for Arabic speakers. It’s a tutorial based website called Qtab.net, located in Cairo, Egypt. The site is run by Essam and Heba Hawas. Heba is the voice behind all the tutorials and she does a wonderful job (check out Heba’s tutorial about the Roto Brush here). They also do tutorials for the cartoon creation program, Toon Boom.

In addition to the Qtab website, you can also reach out to Qtab on both Facebook and Twitter (@qtabdotnet). Heba Hawas also has some videos uploaded to Vimeo here. Be sure to connect with them if you are interested in learning more about After Effects in the Arabic world.

Not an Arabic speaker but looking for resources for After Effects in your native language? There’s already a fine blog post called, “Getting Started and Help and Support Pages in Several Languages” that addresses foreign language support on Todd Kopriva’s “After Effects Region of Interest” blog.

The folks at qtab.net can also be found helping folks out with After Effects on the new Arabic language forum here at Adobe.Share on Facebook

Promote Your Articles and Tutorials at Adobe

Do you write books, tutorials or DVDs about Premiere Pro or After Effects? Then you’d probably like to know that there is a simple and powerful way to promote your content. How? Add a comment to Help, that’s how! Comments, which may include links to your work, can be added quickly by content creators directly to Help. For example, if you made a video tutorial about titling in Premiere Pro you could go to the Help page about titling and add a comment with a link to your work. This will appear right at the bottom of the page. It’s easy to do too. This blog post aims to show you how to do just that.

Before I get into the methodology of adding comments to Help, content creators will want to know the advantages of adding comments in the first place.

  • Many more users come to Adobe.com than standard tutorial sites.
  • Your comment is targeted directly to users that need your content.
  • It’s a great way to promote your tutorial books or DVDs.
  • Drives more users to your content giving you more credibility at tutorial sites.
  • Positions you as as one of the “leaders” of the community.

To make a comment with a link, start by going to the Help Pages online.

  1. For Premiere Pro, go to Help online: http://bit.ly/a50FeO
    For After Effects, go to Help online: http://bit.ly/amSwN2
  2. In the upper left corner of help, check the “This Reference Only” option, type in the search term for the topic you wish to provide a link for, and then press Enter.
  3. After you’ve found the proper page, click “Add Your Comment and Rating” at the top of that Help page.
  4. The Adobe ID page launches.Log in to Help with your Adobe ID. If you do not have an Adobe ID, go here to get one: http://bit.ly/ab9Zj5
  5. Scroll down to the bottom of the page and click the “Add Comment” button.
  6. A comments field will launch. Enter the relevant information in the field. Don’t forget to include the link for your content in the body of the comment—no HTML code is required.
  7. When you are satisfied with the comment, click the “Save” button.
    Your comment will then be posted with a link to your content.

Feel free to do this on your own any time you like. If you need help doing this, you can contact me (kmonahan—AT—adobe.com) and I’ll add it to the Help comments. Help comments can be seen by every user that goes to help for that particular product. The best tutorials get permanently added to Help (folded in from comments) as long as they are high quality.

If you’re offering tutorials and “how to” books or videos for sale, I can also fold in portions of your content (via your publisher) into Help. This is a great way to promote your books and videos to the Adobe community completely free of charge. If you are authoring this kind of content, drop me a line and let me know what you’ve worked on so I can request access to your content from your publisher.

If you would like to do more tutorials but are running short of ideas, I can also help with that too. I have areas of content that do need reinforcing. Content that matches our needs is ideal.

If you know a content creator be sure to tell them, as well.Share on Facebook

Adobe Premiere Pro Tutorials from Andrew Devis

The Creative Cow has always been one of my favorite portals for information about digital video. It’s really a great pro community you should definitely check out. Over at “the Cow” there is thing that is never in short supply, tutorials! There are loads of them for Premiere Pro, so be sure to check out the entire catalog here.

Recently, a bunch of new tutorials for Premiere Pro CS5 has cropped up. Authored by Andrew Devis, these are valuable nuggets of information sure to get you to the next level of expertise. Thank you Andrew!

Here are the links to get you started.

Premiere Pro Starting Splash Screens
Using and Creating Title Templates in Premiere Pro
Title Style Shortcuts in Premiere Pro
Spicing Up Your Titles in Premiere Pro
Rolling Titles in Premiere Pro
Audio Editing Basics for Premiere Pro and Soundbooth
Balancing Audio Levels for Multiple Clips in Premiere Pro
Pan and Zoom and Corner Pin Effects in Premiere Pro
Links to all of Andrew Devis’ Tutorials

Note: I am appending this post because Andrew Devis has cranked out even more tutorials in the past few days. Check out these links:

Sync Lock and Target Tracks
Unlinking Audio and Video for J and L Cuts
Using Markers to Pace Your Editing
Understanding the ‘Source Panel’ ToolsShare on Facebook