Posts tagged CEM

Postprocessing your correspondence

Saket Agarwal

Correspondences created in enterprises would typically have to be integrated to a back-end process for further distribution (via email, fax, print), document processing (apply digital signatures, encryption, etc.) or archival of the correspondence.

The Adobe Correspondence Management solution provides a convenient way to achieve this by leveraging orchestrations/processes on the ADEP Document Services platform for defining the back-end process (that can use one or more Document Services, based on the enterprise requirements), and providing the ability to easily bind them to a given correspondence template.

Read more about creating a postprocess for the CM solution on the Document Server.

Once such processes are created on the Document Server, can then be mapped to a Letter template in the  Postprocess drop down of the Letter Template Editor (as shown below), where the available postprocesses (as defined on the Document Server) are listed:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tip: If you create a new process, with an existing Manage Assets UI session opened, your process will not be listed in the Postprocesses dropdown until you relaunch or refresh (F5) the Manage Assets browser window (or open the Manage Assets UI in a new browser window).

When the correspondence creation is complete (using the Create Correspondence UI), users can Submit the correspondence (see snapshot below indicating the Submit button), which invokes the associated/mapped postprocess for that Letter template, with the final correspondence PDF and XML data (used to generate the PDF). The postprocess, which would be an orchestration, can then act upon the document (PDF) as necessary.

 

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Original article at http://blogs.adobe.com/saket/cm-postprocess/.

Project and team hierarchy in ICR

The campaign is the highest layer in the Integrated Content Review object hierarchy. The project is the second layer in the object hierarchy and the asset is the third layer. In fact, an asset is the basic unit of work — a work item — in the Integrated Content Review workflow.

Multiple levels of project nesting are supported.

Assets are actively managed through review cycles and drive all statuses in the campaign. For example, if an asset is late, the status of the parent campaign automatically becomes red. If all the constituent assets of a campaign are on time or green, the status of the campaign is green. Therefore, the status of a campaign is derived bottom-up instead of top-down.

Team member inheritance

Teams are built in a bottom-up fashion. Team members at any level in the campaign hierarchy include team members from lower levels. In other words, a campaign includes all members of a project. A project, in turn, includes all members of the assets within it.

Additionally, at any level in the campaign, a new member can be added directly to the team list. These new members have no responsibilities towards the campaign, but they receive notifications when statuses change. They also get access to the solution interface so that they can proactively see how the campaign is progressing.

For background information, you can refer to the Integrated Content Review Solution Guide.

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Original article at http://blogs.adobe.com/samartha/2011/09/project-and-team-hierarchy-in-icr.html.

What is Customer Experience Management?

Customer Experience (CX a.k.a CEM) is the sum of all experiences a customer has with a supplier of goods or services, over the lifecycle of their relationship. This covers several phases including awareness, discovery, attraction, interaction, transaction, use, service, cultivation and advocacy.
These are not simply sequential, but rather a continuum of phases existing within the context of CX.CX is not something you just bolt on to your existing enterprise architecture.
So why does CEM/CX matter? The simple answer is for retention of your existing business customers. Your competition is a click away and studies show people are 3 times more likely to tell others about a bad experience than a good one.  People declaring a bad experience with you are ripe for your competition to steal.

With social media, bad CX stories can escalate virally and ruin the reputation of a business in weeks or even days.  People notice BAD experiences and get emotional!  They want a good customer experience.

 

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Original article at http://technoracle.blogspot.com/2011/04/what-is-customer-experience-management.html.

Building a Better Digital Customer Experience Doesn’t Have to Cost MILLIONS

In my role I spend a lot of time talking with organizations in both Corporate and Government sectors about creating great customer experiences. In fact, understanding the challenges and opportunities for these organizations is the aspect of my role that I enjoy the most. These organizations all want to achieve great digital customer experiences…who wouldn’t? […]

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Original article at http://www.avoka.com/blog/?p=1424.

Adobe’s Ed Van Siclen talks Customer Experience on Sky Business News

Mark Szulc

Adobe’s Ed Van Siclen talked to Sky Business News about the importance of Customer Experience Management (CEM) during a recent visit to Australia. I’ve talked to Ed on many occassions and seen him present. He clearly gets what CEM is all about and how organizations are taking advantage of the latest solutions Adobe is providing. […]


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Original article at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarkSzulcsBlog/~3/ji1CC5AFOSY/.

Configuring email notifications for the Managed Review & Approval Solution Accelerator

- Gilbert Yu

The Adobe Managed & Approval Solution Accelerator 9.5 is a wonderful solution for automating reviews for documents in your organization. One of the handy features  of the solution is email updates for automated reviews. For example, emails are automatically sent for these scenarios:

  • When a reviewer completes a review or review stage.
  • When an approver approves a document.
  • When reviewers or approvers are added to or removed from a review.
  • When a review or review stage completes.

This requirement is necessary for organizations that have regulated review and approval workflows. However, in non-regulated environments, this requirement may be a distraction to users because of the number of emails  that can be sent in reviews that involve significant number of people.

Alexandra Phillips has provided an article to describe how to configure  the emails that are sent using the Solution Template provided with the Managed Review & Approval Solution Accelerator. Check out the article here.

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Original article at http://blogs.adobe.com/ADEPhelp/2011/07/configuring-email-notifications-for-the-managed-review-approval-solution-accelerator.html.

Adobe Launches New Digital Enterprise Platform for Customer Experience Management

Mark Szulc

New Solutions Empower Marketing and IT to Transform Multi-Channel Customer Experiences June 20, 2011 12:04 AM Eastern Daylight Time SAN JOSE, Calif.–(EON: Enhanced Online News)–Adobe Systems Incorporated (Nasdaq:ADBE) today announced its new Adobe Digital Enterprise Platform for Customer Experience Management (CEM). The platform enables enterprises to build immersive, multi-channel digital interactions for today’s social and mobile customers. […]


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Original article at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MarkSzulcsBlog/~3/W8pYZMeRIiI/.

Adobe Retires the “LiveCycle” Brand, Its Services Become Part of Broader Capability

Jayan Kandathil

On June 20, 2011, Adobe announced its new “Digital Enterprise Platform” software or ADEP. The platform is designed to address a new problem domain that Adobe and others have identified as “Customer Experience Management” or CEM. Please use the Twitter hashtag #AdobeCEM to follow tweets regarding CEM.

For customers with extant investment in Adobe LiveCycle and are wondering about what all of this means to them, here are some points to consider:

1) The enterprise services, and the orchestration capabilities that LiveCycle provided will all continue to be available as part of the new Adobe Digital Enterprise Platform software. They will henceforth be called “Document Services“.

2) “Document Services” will continue to be J2EE (JEE) applications requiring a J2EE appserver such as JBoss, WebSphere or WebLogic as well as a relational database such as Oracle, SQL Server, DB2 or MySQL.

3) Day CQ5 will become a “Customer Experience Solution” named “Web Experience Management”. There will also be other Customer Experience Solutions.

4) Mosaic will henceforth be called “Composite Application Framework”

5) LiveCycle Data Services will become “Data Services”

5) All “Customer Experience Solutions”, “Composite Application Framework” and “Data Services” will run on the new Apache Felix OSGi framework, not J2EE (no Tomcat, JBoss, WebSphere or WebLogic required). They will be using a JSR-283 compliant Java Content Repository (JCR) – no relational database will be required.

Here’s a simple equation to remember:
ADEP = LiveCycle + (Day) CQ5 + Mosaic + Data Services + “Customer Experience Solutions” (formerly “Solution Accelerators”)

We will be renaming this blog once the Adobe Digital Enterprise Platform software is released.

For those interested in the history of Adobe’s LiveCycle brand, see this.

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Original article at http://blogs.adobe.com/livecycle/2011/06/adobe-retires-the-livecycle-brand-its-services-become-part-of-broader-capability.html.

Customer Experience Management – A Case Study in Failure

I want to share an example of a failure for a company to grasp the importance of customer experience management.  If you have not heard, Customer Experienceis a term used to describe the sum of all experiences a customer has with a supplier of goods or services, over the duration of their relationship. Customer Experience covers multiple phases and contexts including awareness, discovery, attraction, interaction, purchase, use, cultivation and ultimately advocacy or ranting (like I am doing).

The story starts with me.  I am an avid outdoors type person.  I love having good ski, snowboard, mountain bike, kayak and hiking gear.  I generally buy nothing short of the best as I’ve found myself in places where your life depends upon your equipment.

Recently I bought some Vibram hiking boots from Mountain Equipment Co-op.  They basically wore out in about a year despite the fact they were only one of 6 pairs of footwear I used in that year.  This includes the gaping holes in the toes and any of the plastic area.  I called MEC which were very helpful but they said my best bet was to talk to Vibram myself.  I went to the website twice now and left messages telling someone what happened and asking at the very least if they would contact me.  I feel the quality of the boots is real bad and could have been possibly improved by the company examining them (I will otherwise not use them anyways).

Anyways, long story short, no one returned any communication to me.  The company has permanently lost me as a customer over this.  They showed no consideration for me as a customer.

Now while I rant about other companies on this blog with similar story (Rheem Water Heaters, Hillcrest Plumbing – both criminals IMO and The evil City Center Florists), I also want to commend companies that do really good things with customer experience.  I recently made a post applauding Marriott Hotels for outstanding customer experiences.   I’ve had similar great experiences with Shaw Cable Group, Delta Faucets (great warranty service) and others like Mountain Equipment Co-op.

So what are the lessons to be learned here?

1. If you run a company, you can no longer ignore the power of the people to spread bad news of horrible experiences via social media such as blogs, twitter, facebook etc.  A simple person like myself can put such a message out and it will eventually reach potentially millions of your customers.

2. I would suspect people are much more motivated to spread negative experience than good ones.  Companies like Vibram and ignore your customers when they have serious and legitimate complaints, it will hurt you.  Just read the follow on messages on the City Center florists blog post about how others reacted to their deceptive and illegal business practices – http://technoracle.blogspot.com/2010/03/vancouver-city-centre-florists-use.html

3. You need a platform to reconcile the multiple channels of experience into a single view at your company.  This should take into account social media activities as well as data from existing business processes and CRM type systems.

4. Understanding the context of an experience is essential.  This will probably involve ontology work or semantics for a shared understanding of the possibilities, meaning and concepts within an experience, with inside of and outside of the enterprise.

5.  The old way of doing business is dead!  Big multinationals cannot simply adopt the Ostrich move (stick your head in the sand until danger goes away).  YOu must be proactive in ensuring your customers have the best experience or they will not be your customers much longer.

In closing, if I owned stock in Vibram,  I’d be selling it as fast as I can.  Bad experience, shoddy workmanship and no desire to communicate with customers are a recipe for financial disaster.

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Original article at http://technoracle.blogspot.com/2011/03/customer-experience-management-case.html.

How the architect looks at Customer Experience (video)

What does Customer Experience Management really mean, abstract of how it is implemented?  This was what I considered when being interviewed in Barcelona earlier this year. The goal was to explore what “Customer Experience” means in terms of how enterprise architects might think.

 

The idea of “user experience” itself is not new. Most competent architects consider the users’ perspectives during any interaction with a system or systems they are designing. Customer Experience is unique and represents an emerging discipline of modern enterprise architecture covering many aspects of the logical, data and process views of any enterprise, spanning more than one system. Customer Experience (CX) is the sum of all experiences a customer has with a supplier of goods or services, over the duration of their relationship. This duration may cover several unique stages including awareness, discovery, attraction, interaction, purchase, use, cultivation and advocacy. CX as a term covers multiple contexts (the lifetime of a relationship down to an individual transaction. (Source = Wikipedia).
To give a more concrete example, an individual may have a history with an enterprise. This history may encompass several of the stages mentioned above including discovery (data may be stored in website interaction analytics, browser cookies, and tracking), interaction (data may be stored in CRM systems), use (data may be stored in the state of a business process instance), and advocacy (data may be stored in tweets, Facebook posts, and other social media).
The question that looms before any architect is how to reconcile the various data and historical interactions so your enterprise can deliver the best possible experience. Even the term “Customer” here is probably too prescriptive. The experience factor can also cover users that are within your own domain such as employees. Now factor in that this customer may have multiple concurrent channels of communication open and the problem comes into focus very quickly. How can you reconcile social media trails with CRM data? How can the telephony system be reconciled with the users’ web browsing data and process interactions? The graphic below illustrates this challenge.

 

The idea of converging the data required in any specific channels of interaction so you can deliver that experience is really powerful in terms of the experience it can deliver. If I call a company and the person who picks up the phone can immediately have full access to all my data, chances are high that they will serve me better.  The more they know about me, the less they have to query me at the very least.  It always agitated me when I would phone the credit card company and had an automated attendant ask me to key in my CC number, only to be forwarded to a human operator who had no visibility of the data I just entered, so I had to provide it to them again (or having my call forwarded to another department of an enterprise and having to repeat an entire conversation from start to finish).  An important thing to note here is that companies that successfully mitigate this have a huge advantage in garnering customer loyalty over those who ignore it.  Even though customers may not be able to distinguish the exact reason one company offers a better experience over another, the experience will be felt.So where does Adobe fit in?

The development of LiveCycle ES as a service oriented platform, essentially what the industry calls an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB), enabled data to be aggregated from various sources and gave enterprises the ability to access data and orchestrate data and services into processes, both short and long lived.  The acquisition of Omniture gave Adobe the leading web analytics suite.  The acquisition  of Day Software completed the technology for delivering CX and integrating social media channels however the integration of these technologies will really shine in the next evolution of the LiveCycle ES platform.  Additionally, the acquisition of Demdex provides the next evolution of our enterprise platform with the ability to enable clients to aggregate and manage their strategic data assets as well as make data actionable in a broad range of third-party advertising technologies.  Even the latest beta release of Flash Player 10.3 is rife with new media measurement features that allow deeper access of analytics data.

The mainstream press seems to have missed the agile Adobe acquisitions in terms of where the company is heading and what it will be able to deliver to enterprise customers in years to come. Some analysts like RedMonk, Forrester and, Gartner seemed to have taken notice though.  We’ve quietly built ourselves into a superpower in terms of being able to deliver CX to our customers.

To sum this up, architects MUST consider the view of overall customer experience over the lifetime of the relationship between their enterprise and the customers.  The alpha architects will need to consider how to successfully integrate RIA data with back end systems and distributed web data, sometimes in the form of a trail of digital breadcrumbs.  When they consider the many aspects and challenges of this view of architecture, it will become apparent who has positioned themselves as the leader.

Enjoy the video!

 

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Original article at http://technoracle.blogspot.com/2011/03/how-architect-looks-at-customer.html.

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