Posts tagged designer

LC Designer: Wrong variable getting deleted

If you are working on a form in LiveCycle Designer which has not just form variables but also object collections and/or script objects all those will be listed on the Hierarchy tab under Variables.
Issue: If you delete a form variable from the Form Properties dialog (File > Form Properties > Variables) the wrong one will get deleted if the variables are not sorted.

To resolve this issue read this blog post.

LiveCycle ES4 Certification Exams Now Available

The LiveCycle Adobe Certified Expert (ACE) exams are now available through Pearson VUE. Becoming an Adobe Certified Expert gives you advanced skills recognized and respected by employers. By proving your expertise with Adobe solutions, you demonstrate your commitment to advancing your skills and taking on greater challenges.

Know more at this blog by Jeff Stanier.

Displaying PDF documents/forms from Adobe LiveCycle in the browser

Users of Adobe LiveCycle quite regularly interact with PDF documents. Some examples are:

  • Rendering customised documents for print purposes
  • Creating PDF forms for on- and offline use to collect data for further processing
  • Rendering pre-filled PDF forms to send out to customers/users for completion and physical signature etc.

In a lot of cases those PDF documents are what’s called an XFA-based PDF form/template. XFA is Adobe’s XML Forms Architecture and a proprietary technology to describe form information. I spare you the technical details, but essentially quite often those XFA-based forms get wrapped into a PDF document, this is done by rendering the XFA information over a PDF page background.


Read the issue and steps to fix it at this blog.

Adobe LiveCycle Designer book – 2nd edition released

JP Terry has done it again! JP is the CEO of SmartDoc Technologies and he’s released the second edition of his very popular Adobe LiveCycle Designer book. The first version sold over 11,000 copies! This edition has all-new sections of best practices for PDF forms and is up-to-date with Designer ES4 features.

Read about what is included and find a purchase link in this blog post.

Rendering a Chart in Mobile Forms

In this article we will use JQPlot charting capabilities to draw a pie chart.To Learn more about JQPlot- click here The charts data will be coming from the table which is designed using the LiveCycle Designer. We will also be exploring the FormBridge API’s to access the Table’s data to feed into the JQPlot chart.

Read the complete post here.

Mobile Form upscaling

Mobile Form rendition of an XFA form is almost similar to PDF Form rendition in terms of behavior and appearance. Some of the dissimilarities are discussed in Mobile Form Vs PDF Form post. In this post, I’ll discuss one key difference that a form designer should take care while designing the XFA Template and that is where it is so critical to preview your templates from the designer itself.



Read the complete post here.

Decoding Mobile Form Html

Mobile Form generates html snippet from XDP template designed from LiveCycle Designer. In this post, we will decode the internal structure of the generated html snippet. Once you are familiar with the html structure, you can customize it at will.

Generally, Mobile Form generates an html <div> element for every object of XFA form maintaining the same hierarchical structure. Here is the html snippet source of the xfa form and the red lines shows the 1-1 mapping between xfa objects and html.



Read the complete post here.

Mobile Forms: LiveCycle Designer way

You want to quickly test your designed form on how it would look like as Mobile Form, you can do it right from the livecycle designer without any other application. You first need to point your designer to use an LiveCycle ES4 server. You can configure it in LiveCycle Designer.

To know how to do this configuration, read this blog post.

Accessible Mobile form

An accessible form is one that a wide range of people can use, including those who may have disabilities that affect how they are able to interact with the form on the computer screen. For example, the form user may have a visual impairment or reduced mobility.

Mobile form uses ARIA html5 accessibility standard to support a number of features and capabilities that enhance the usability of forms for users with a range of disabilities, and assist form authors and create forms that are more accessible to people with disabilities.



Read the complete post here.
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