Posts tagged document security

Page 0 support for protected documents in LiveCycle Rights Management ES4

Adobe LiveCycle Rights Management ES4 introduces Page 0 (Wrapper Document) support for Policy protected documents in Adobe LiveCycle ES4 release. In case of most of the non-Adobe PDF viewers, on opening LCRM protected documents a blank screen appears or the application aborts. With Page 0 support, for RM Policy protected PDFs, Cover Page or Page0 is displayed instead of the previewer displaying a blank screen or being completely aborted when viewed in non-Adobe PDF viewers.

Read the complete post here.

AEM document services and document security add-ons, powered by LiveCycle

Today we are announcing new AEM document services & document security add-ons, powered by LiveCycle.  These AEM add-ons let you publish & secure enterprise forms and documents on your website.  Learn more here: http://adobe.ly/14uV8lM

Security misconceptions – Watermarks, Usage Rights and Rights Management

-Tai

There is a confusion about what features of Acrobat and PDFs in general offer by way of securing documents. I would like to do a very cursory overview of the items that I have so far seen users consider “security.”

To be clear, by “security” I mean the ability or inability to access the contents of the PDF, thus safeguarding information from entering the wrong hands.

1) Not Security-Oriented

a) Watermarks

Unlike on your Dollar, Euro or Pound notes (etc), the watermark is NOT a guarantee of integrity, veracity or anything at all.

In the PDF world, a visible watermark only exists as a notification mechanism. If a watermark says “Confidential,” it is only warning the viewer that the content is confidential, but will not otherwise try to make itself indelible.

It is meant to be a very visible mark on the page, with the added property of not completely obfuscation the items underneath (allowing readability to be maintained)

b) Certification

A Certified PDF carries a digital signature certifying that certain things can and cannot be done with it. Namely:

-A PDF certified to run privileged scripts can run scripts requiring special privileges, such as writing to the hard drive.
-A PDF certified to be unmodified means that so long as the PDF has been modified withing given parameters (fields filled in for example), then the certification will hold. If a visual aspect of the PDF changes though, the certification will be broken, and Acrobat will report an error.

Certification covers a number of other use cases as well, but I hope the above illustrates sufficiently why this is a not a security-related item, rather a usability concern.

c) Reader Extensions Usage Rights

Acrobat and LiveCycle can extend the usability of PDFs to Adobe Reader, the free PDF viewing application. By extending usability features, you can allow Reader users to fill in forms and save that content, add comment annotation, and other functionality.

However, if the same extended form is opened in Acrobat, the user can do to the PDF pretty much anything that Acrobat has at its disposition.

REUR adds functionality to Reader. Any extra functionality it does not add is a restriction that Reader already had.

2) Security-Oriented

a) Password Protection

Using password protection, you can encrypt the PDF so it can only be opened by a person who has the password. You can also prevent the PDF from being used in certain ways, such as modifying the pages.

You cannot however track who has opened the PDF, when and at what IP. That is the domain of Rights Management.

b) LiveCycle Rights Management (aka Policy Server)

LiveCycle 7 introduced Policy Server, later renamed to LiveCycle Rights Management. Adobe LiveCycle/ADEP Rights Management protects your documents from being accessed by parties you have not authorized to do so.

This allows the document publisher to:
-protect with a user ID/password combination
-force the identification to go to a remote server
-restrict usage rights depending on the user’s group

……………..

Read the full article at http://blogs.adobe.com/an_tai/archives/176.

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