Feedback wanted for the Flex Boot Camp

I would love to get some feedback from those of you who attended the Flex Boot Camp. We’re going to be holding it again in Barcelona and I’d like to make sure that we address some of the issues we found. Things that I know could use improvement:

– We need to have Internet access working and power for everyone
– We should make sure that a Macbook will be able to present just as well as a Windows laptop
– The name boot camp is misleading for what we had intended. I admit that my expectation was that anyone attending would have at least a few Flex sessions under their belt, and that therefore we did not need to spend time on beginner topics. However half the audience was total beginners and therefore we should have had more prepared.
– We also ended up having more presentations and no code-along sessions. Would people have liked to code along? I think each session would need to be longer and we’d need to cover less.
– Should we even allow this to be ad hoc or should we have everything planned out beforehand?

Please send comments ASAP 🙂

Thanks! And thanks for making this MAX so great!

7 Responses to Feedback wanted for the Flex Boot Camp

  1. David Tucker says:

    I think overall it was a good session – but I don’t think it was clear who the target audience was. Beginners came to the class thinking it was an “Intro to Flex” and the Advanced came thinking it would be a cutting-edge “code-along”. I think a bit more of a detailed description in the sessions list could have made it a bit more specific. However, I feel that overall – there was a lot of good stuff. Oh – and thank for the chance to present on Cairngorm at the Boot Camp.

  2. Fuad Kamal says:

    Hi Matt, overall I think the session was beneficial, but I agree with most (not all) of your observations. Yes – the session name had led me to have other expectations – but I would still have like to have seen those expectations met. Namely, cutting out the beginner stuff (like ‘intro to Cairngorm’) and I was really interested to see what the coding session was going to be like.I think a common problem that occurred across ALL the MAX sessions I attended was hardware issues. I am guessing the projectors were supplied by McCormick place? They seem to be dated equipment…maybe in future conferences the specific hardware to be supplied by the facilities should be discussed up front and well in advance. 800X600 maximum resolution on a projector kind of sucks, and these dinosaurs looked like they might break the suspension on a small car…Things like the Internet going out are problems that could be planned for, though; we could have set up an ad hoc network, especially since most of us were running on Macbook Pro’s (that was a surprise – seemed to be the typical choice for most attendees) I think it might have been relatively simple to stitch together a quick peer-based solution using AirPort.I would have liked to have seen something like the Allurent talk put into practice, live & ad hoc – split the room into two or three large developer groups and challenge us to see who can build an app faster and better – implenting things like Unit Testing and that [source] magic Daniel eluded to (I’m still not sure I understand it fully) – all in the span of an hour or so. Make it more interesting by profiling the attendees beforehand and making sure the groups are split into more equal teams by splitting the experienced folks up into the different teams, including Adobe people. That way, we all get to learn more. Event better, get Adobe consulting folks into that mix, so we really learn from their battle-hardened experiences. The hour or so I spent Monday night with AC was extremely beneficial, if for no other reason than hearing Steven Webster say first hand that they developed Cairngorm the way they did from field experience and that they continually tear apart their own methodologies based on what they experience in the field. I guess it just inspires more confidence to realize that this stuff is not just based on classroom theory.

  3. Bootcamp generally means an immersive introduction to technology so it’s not surprising a lot of people came along expecting to go from 0-60 in one intensive half day session. The bootcamp name was *extremely* misleading. If I’d known that it was going to be random people giving random talks, I would not have wasted two hours of my time – I’d have gone to other sessions and learned something worthwhile instead (I hung around for two hours *hoping* it would get organized and back on track but I finally gave up).I’ve heard similar feedback from people who were in the other bootcamps. Whose bright idea was it to label them “bootcamps”???If I’d known what it was really going to be, I would have gone to the ColdFusion one and probably volunteered to present / run an exercise.At least I won’t be tricked by the name in Barcelona (but PLEASE make sure you get the word out as to what these sessions really are – they are NOT bootcamps for the technology!).As for descriptions of sessions – this was a general problem because neither the pocket guide in the name tags, nor the larger event guide in the notebook actually had session descriptions at all – and the print out of the scheduler did not provide session descriptions. Nothing that attendees were given contained the descriptions as far as I can see. Just the web site.

  4. Eric B says:

    I agree with everyone above. Every boot camp I have been to involves much coffee, a computer, code, and compile errors. It should have been called Flex Open Mic – Come all who want to show off your projects but don’t show anyone how you built it.Overall, I’m not very pleased with the last day of the conference. It almost seems like a recovery day for the big party of the night before. Don’t get me wrong, I really enjoyed the party, but my company paid good money for me to bring knowledge back and I can’t honestly tell them the last day was totally worth it. Also, I had another class on the last day where the instructor didn’t even show up. None of the staff seemed to know where he was until at least 30 minutes into the class.

  5. Overall, I���m not very pleased with the last day of the conference. It almost seems like a recovery day for the big party of the night before. Don���t get me wrong, I really enjoyed the party, but my company paid good money for me to bring knowledge back and I can’t honestly tell them the last day was totally worth it. Also, I had another class on the last day where the instructor didn’t even show up. None of the staff seemed to know where he was until at least 30 minutes into the class.this is good idea

  6. oyunlar says:

    would love to get some feedback from those of you who attended the Flex Boot Camp. We’re going to be holding it again in Barcelona and I’d like to make sure that we address some of the issues we found this think is a little wrong

  7. oyunlar says:

    As for descriptions of sessions – this was a general problem because neither the pocket guide in the name tags, nor the larger event guide in the notebook actually had session descriptions at all – and the print out of the scheduler did not provide session descriptions. Nothing that attendees were given contained the descriptions as far as I can see. Just the web site.this is interesting idea