What do you want to know about Macromedia Central?

The title says it all. What do you want to know about Macromedia Central? Post your questions in the comments section.

Update: We you can see a new Central screen shot at the following sites:

You can find a ton of additional information at the Macromedia Central Development Center.

136 Responses to What do you want to know about Macromedia Central?

  1. Ryan Matsikas says:

    uhm when is my turn for the beta coming?that is all i got 🙂

  2. Rich says:

    How will it help me in using Flash and XMLSockets? SSL for Flash outside the browser? Faster processing of larger amounts of data? Will it help secure the products I develop? Can my SWF still be ‘read’ and then ‘duplicated’? How will this product strengthen the communities I’m trying to develop (online and offline)?

  3. Rich says:

    Yes this is serious.I’m very tired of never being ‘let-in’.How are you going to prevent Shirky’s Law from taking over?http://www.shirky.com/writings/powerlaw_weblog.html

  4. mike chambers says:

    >How will it help me in using Flash and XMLSockets?Won’t help or hinder. It will work the same as in the player.>SSL for Flash outside the browser?Yes. This is supported in Central.>Faster processing of larger amounts of data?Yes. Although it will depend on what you are doing. We also have native web service support, so performance should be improved when using web services.>Will it help secure the products I develop?How so? Can you give me an example?>How will this product strengthen the communities I’m trying to develop (online and offline)?Of course this will depend in part on your community, but I think Central offers a ton of possibilities. Aside from just being a great platform for deploying community / collaborative applications, it also has integrated try / buy support so you can easily offer value added apps / services for users (and make it easy for the community to support you and the community).mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  5. mike chambers says:

    >How are you going to prevent Shirky’s Law from taking over?I am not sure what you mean in the context of Central.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  6. Geoff Bowers says:

    Why not release a sample app in the next DRK that acts as an offline/online blogger like Zempt (http://www.zempt.com/) — working against the XML-RPC MoveableType blog API (perhaps leveraging the xmlrpc cf components released in DRK4)?

  7. mike chambers says:

    hmmm…. that seems like it would the perfect type of app for Central…: )mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  8. mike chambers says:

    >uhm when is my turn for the beta coming?We will be having a public beta in the comming weeks / months.Plus, we are doing the beta in stages, so you may still be added before that.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  9. Is Central preparing to roll out across all FP6 platforms? Linux, Mac, PDA, cellphones at the same time?Will central allow more access to system functionality, such as apple script, or windows features such as SAPI (speech recognition). I could see Central really being the offline/online app of the next generation, especially if it could use a 3rd party speech/command recognition system.

  10. Peter Elst says:

    Will the Central payment gateway allow for donations or is it only possible to determine a fixed price?Just wondering ;)- Peter

  11. Bill says:

    why should I care? with all the tools to see the flash source code who would buy any of the apps?

  12. > Will the Central payment gateway allow for donations or is it only possible to determine a fixed price?Peter,You’ll be able to request a payment at any time, for any [dynamic] amount.

  13. >Faster processing of larger amounts of data?”Yes. Although it will depend on what you are doing. We also have native web service support, so performance should be improved when using web services”Don’t forget, Regular Expression support.>How will this product strengthen the communities I’m trying to develop (online and offline)?If you want your app to work well offline Central offers some pretty cool caching features.

  14. Charles Parcell says:

    Before I ask y question I want to echo th questions about tools that rip Flash code and if there is any copy protection of the Flash app from cache.Ok, now mine…Will Central be a spring board for allowing “Xtras” into Flash?How large does Macromedia invision the applications being built for Central? ex “Flash Office”? or “Calculator”?Will Central be allowing robust imaging of raster graphics? ex ActionScript that allows the same functionality as Director’s imaging Lingo.Will we be able to save “custom” file types to the users machine? How large can files be? I assume that the limit for SharedObjects at the very least will be increased.

  15. Here’s one for you,If the payment system is that dynamic, what is going to stop people from trying to use it to sell goods?Is that allowed? If not, how do you tell the difference?

  16. mike chambers says:

    >Is Central preparing to roll out across all FP6 platforms?Yes. initially we will release on Windows and OSX and other platforms will follow shortly after that.>Will central allow more access to system functionality, such as apple script, or windows features such as SAPIHmm, that is an interesting suggestion. Currently we don’t have that functionality planned, but I am going to pass this onto the team.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  17. > If the payment system is that dynamic, what is going to stop people from trying to use it to sell goods?Hmmm… I don’t think there would be a problem with that. Just remember that Macromedia scrapes ~20% off of the transaction. Although this may not apply to all transactions, and just the purchase of the application. There will be different licensing options that may cover this.

  18. l.m. orchard says:

    I’m going to assume that Central provides a great environment, both API-wise and UI-wise, but I just posted some musings over at my blog:http://www.decafbad.com/blog/geek/mm_central_works.htmlBasically, Central sounds great to me, but I’m wondering what will make it different than all the other “little downloadable app corralled in by a big manager app” ideas that have come before?Because I’d love to see it take off so I can find more excuses to muck around with ActionScript and connecting Flash frontends to data.

  19. Vinny Timmermans says:

    With the release of Breeze Live Macromedia started competing with their own developers community. They made a switch in their busines strategy from being a tools provider towards a provider of tools and ready-to-use information convenience solutions. Although I think Central is a great idea, I am very curious if developers are willing to place all their innovative ideas on a platform that is fully controlled by their new competitor. How does Macromedia, which has immediate insight in the market success of all Central applications, guarantee that Central will not become a big container of innovative ideas from their developer’s community that will be used for new ready-to-use Macromedia solutions.

  20. > used for new ready-to-use Macromedia solutionspatent your application / innovation; everyone’s doing it these days…

  21. James Ahlschwede says:

    Re: Rich’s comment about Shirky’s Law.I think what Rich is talking about is that it’s inevitable that among the total collection of all Central Apps, the usage pattern will follow a power law. So, some apps will get used a lot and be very successful, while the majority will not. Now, this usage pattern is not inheriently unfair, because it’s based on rational reasons – unique functionality, better functionality, etc, and it’s a decision made by the market not from above.However, the pattern is that as time passes, it gets harder and harder to join that top 20% of the most used apps. As the overall audience grows, the inequality increases.The problem is that the people with the longest exposure to Central will have a head start working on their apps. Out of the gate, they be more likely to produce higher quality apps and be more likely to jump straight to the top of the list of most used apps.Macromedia’s problem is this – you still need a lot of developers if you’re going to grow the system overall. But here we already have one person who feels you’ve rigged the game against him. Your selection of Beta testers is a selection of preordained economic winners. Basically, you’re deciding who has first mover advantage. (The dot-com bust didn’t discredit the power of first mover advantage, it just proved that being the first mover isn’t sufficient in and of itself for success. You still need a viable business plan.)What you need to do is explain why this isn’t the case, why Rich should still bother to develop his apps for central – and remember just saying “we’re sure the market will be big enough so that everyone makes buckets of cash” isn’t the answer, because as described by Shirky’s Law a bigger market doesn’t distribute evenly, and the power of being popular early can trump higher quality that is created later. Honestly, I don’t know what you can say – the only way you could have avoided this was to have had all the betas be open.Rich is pissed because you haven’t selected him to be in the preordained group of winners. Can you blame him?

  22. Charles Parcell says:

    Here is another question.Will we be able to distribute application that use the Central API without putting it up in the Central Try/Buy model?For example: I get a contract from company XYZ and I want to develop the application using the Central API for the application but I ONLY want company XYZ to be able to use it.

  23. Charles,Applications can be distributed from intranet / extranet. there will be different licensing options other than the try/buy.

  24. mike chambers says:

    >Rich is pissed because you haven’t selected him to be in the preordained group of winners.Well, we are doing a number of things to address this:1. We are dedicating a lot of resources to make sure that learning to create apps is as easy and straightforward as possible. More info on this in the coming weeks.2. We are doing a rolling beta, which means that we will be adding more people at intervals.3. We will be holding a public beta well in advance of the final release, so anyone who is interested in creating apps should be able to get up to speed in time (i.e. before our launch).4. We are trying to be very open about Central. (the reason behind this weblog post, and some of the screenshots and info available).I am not convinced that Shirky’s law necessarily applies here. Initially, there will be an advantage to having apps available at launch (which everyone will have the chance to do). However, as more apps are creating, the main differentiator will become the quality and usefulness of the apps.hope that helps…mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  25. mike chambers says:

    >Will we be able to distribute application that use the Central API without putting it up in the Central Try/Buy model?Yes.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  26. James A.,It’s like that with any beta I’d say. Some people get to use the tools before everyone else. They may be able to make better / do better things because of it. Thats just the way it is. They also have to go through all of the changes that the program goes through and buggieness that goes along with it.

  27. It seems that all the apps in the Central Beta are using the same font (“Verdana” I think) for dynamic text. How does Central handle shared fonts and can our apps have some sort of repository for frequently used assets?

  28. >How does Central handle shared fonts and can our apps have some sort of repository for frequently used assetsWell, Flash has shared libraries and such… These can be cached on the users machine.

  29. > what capabilities are there for multiple usersAssuming each user has a different login / account on the computer, there shouldn’t be a problem. Or you’d have to emplement some kind of login.

  30. Moedit says:

    >Assuming each user has a different login / >account on the computer, there shouldn’t >be a problem. Or you’d have to >emplement some kind of login.Most family computers don’t have that…So I guess it’s up to us 😛

  31. >Most family computers don’t have that…A bit off topic but… they should, where theres one computer in the house. 🙂 I wouldn’t want my kids reading my documents, looking into my cache, using my expensive programs, deleting stuff……and in XP, how easy is it to switch users. just a couple of clicks.

  32. James Ahlschwede says:

    Geoffrey W.,Just to clarify – personally I’m not upset about the beta process. I was just restating Rich’s question since Mike didn’t grok it. Though, I do have a few questons about Central now that I think about it.Mike,How does Central deal with greedy apps? If my app wants to download 20 MB every time it connects, or if wants to hit the server every 2 seconds it’s going to starve the other apps of bandwidth – are all remote connections managed by Central to spread out the resources? Or will they still be accessing the network in the normal fashion?Something I think I understand, but I’m not 100% clear on – will each developer be hosting their own backend? Or is there some sort of remote data storage/processing backend implied by the Central platform? (Will Macromedia or some designated third party be running servers to host Central apps?)A question sorta asked above but not answered yet – will there be a built-in framework for file uploads and downloads, and using local files to load data? This would be so that people can save copies of their work locally, and share them with other people via email and whatnot. (I know we can already save data locally- but files would facilitate data backup, and be more reassuring to the users than Flash’s usual methods of storing local data.) The download-data, pass-to-friend, have-them-uplaod into their application seems semi-straightforward (except that we currently have to use an html browser for file uploads), but will there be a way of accessing the data without having to pass it through the server? Following up on the not-always connected nature of Central apps, will I be able to process data from a file without passing it through a server?If not (and actually, even if so) is there a built in mechanism for passing data to other users? Is there going to be a registry of users – or will users have a Central unique id for me to pass data to? (Obviously we can all do user to user data passing on our own, but will there be something to facilitate this – and perhaps even allow passing of data between similar apps from different developers. For example provided we can agree on a file format could I pass a document from my word processor to my friend using a word processor written by someone else?)Sorry if some of these questions have already been answered somewhere – I’ve been very busy lately (lots of demand for Flash work!) and haven’t been able to follow Central as much as I would like to. Is there a FAQ somewhere that I’m missing, or is that what we’re creating right now?

  33. mike chambers says:

    >what will make it different than all the other “little downloadable app corralled in by a big manager app” ideas that have come before?I think there are a couple of things that set Central apart.1. integrated try / buy support. It will be very simple for developers to sell their apps (or allow users to try them for a set amount of time). This takes away a ton of the hassle for developers trying to make money from their work.2. Support of Macromedia / Marketing. Macromedia makes money when developers do, and thus you can be assured that we are going to do everything possible to 1) make sure that Central is successful, 2) make sure that developers sell a lot of apps.3. Ubiquity : Since Central is based on the Flash player, we will be able to quickly port it to new operating systems. We plan to release with versions for Windows and OSX, and will follow shortly there after with a Pocket PC version. The Flash player is available on tons of other platforms (linux, solaris, etc…), so there are tons of opportunities.Just some quick thoughts, hope that helps…mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  34. > will each developer be hosting their own backend?Yes.> and perhaps even allow passing of data between similar apps from different developers.Cooperative apps is one of the big selling points with Central. There will be an API to facilitate this and a “standard” data format to help them communicate.

  35. andy makely says:

    I would like to know if any MM folks remember POINTCAST. If so, what makes Central succeed where Pointcast failed years ago?(http://www.wired.com/news/business/0,1367,35208,00.html)Pull vs. push? Online vs. offline? Pointcast hogged so much bandwidth that many corporate IT departments BANNED it from use and blocked its port at the firewall.

  36. andy makely says:

    oops…strip the last “)” off the above wired.com url…

  37. Hans Omli says:

    Will Central have support for right-clicking and contextual menus (aside from the regular, highly annoying menu Flash forces on users outside of a textfield)? This is one of the major drawbacks I see in creating any application in Flash versus HTML or most other environments.Will Central have support for scroll wheels or other scrolling mechanisms included on various devices? This is the major complaint I hear from my users about the current Flash components. The DataGrid, for example, MUST have support for scroll wheel before my customers will accept it.

  38. mike chambers says:

    >How does Central handle shared fonts and can our apps have some sort of repository for frequently used assets?They will be treated the same as if you were building a web based app.It will also have the ability to locally cache content such as xml files, jpgs and other assets.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  39. mike chambers says:

    >How does Central deal with greedy apps?Currently, Central limits the total amount of space that apps can save to the HD (through shared object, scaching data), but the user can increase or decrease this.As far as downloading tons of data, currently, there are no limits put in place by Central. If a particular application makes the system sluggish, or otherwise degrades performance, we expect that users will uninstall the application (similar to if you installed a regular app that did the same).However, I would interested in hearing any suggestions on how such as bandwidth restriction could / should work.>Something I think I understand, but I’m not 100% clear on – will each developer be hosting their own backend? Or is there some sort of remote data storage/processing backend implied by the Central platform? (Will Macromedia or some designated third party be running servers to host Central apps?)If your app requires data from a server (which we expect many will), then you are responsible for that data and server.As far as hosting apps / data, what type of data / services do you think would be useful?>A question sorta asked above but not answered yet – will there be a built-in framework for file uploads and downloads, and using local files to load data?This is something high on our list, but it probably will not make it into the first release (although, as everything I say about Central, that could change).>If not (and actually, even if so) is there a built in mechanism for passing data to other users?There is a built in mechanism and standard format for passing data between apps. I will see if we can release some more info on this soon (maybe a new screenshot?)As far as passing data to users, that would require server integration and can be done in the normal ways this is done with Flash (i.e. FlashCom, XML, XML Sockets, Flash Remoting).>Is there going to be a registry of users – or will users have a Central unique id for me to pass data to?I am not sure what you mean here.>and perhaps even allow passing of data between similar apps from different developers. For example provided we can agree on a file format could I pass a document from my word processor to my friend using a word processor written by someone else?Yes. We have spent a lot of time on this, both in making it easy for developers and end users.Hope that helps…mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  40. mike chambers says:

    >Another question – my understanding is that Central is intended to be some sort of indexed Application Browser, kind of like Netscape+Google, but for applications. (All Central applications are listed in a big searchable database, right?) So, my question is, are there going to be terms of service that govern metadata and content?Yes. We want to ensure that everyone has a good user experience, and thus we will be taking steps to prevent abuse / or content being posted that is against our terms of service.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  41. Vishi says:

    Lots of questions:Is central going to ship with a list of standard components? Which ones?Can I put my app in the system tray? Will the console be in the system tray? Can the app run in the background without a window open? What are the different ways in which my app can alert me? If I make a component, will it get cached in central even when the app is deleated?How can my app pass data to other apps? Through a central standard or do the developers setup their own standards for interoperability?

  42. mike chambers says:

    >Is central going to ship with a list of standard components? Which ones?The final list is not complete (we are adding more), but they will contain all of the standard components (push button, radio button, etc…).>Can I put my app in the system tray? Will the console be in the system tray?Not in the first version, although the console will be in the system tray. You can send alerts / notices that will notify the user of an event.>Can the app run in the background without a window open?Yes.>If I make a component, will it get cached in central even when the app is deleated?No.>How can my app pass data to other apps? Through a central standard or do the developers setup their own standards for interoperability?There will be a standard data format and API, as well as a standard interface for users.hope that helps…mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  43. Anthony says:

    From everything I have read about Central, it sounds really interesting. I have just a few quick questions.1. When I first heard about Central, for some reason, I got the idea of a program that is embedded in the desktop, like a new type of wallpaper that would always be up and running on the user’s computer. After looking at the screenshots, it is clear that central runs as a program in its own window. I was wondering how the user accesses Central. Is it setup to automatically start when they turn on their computer (Like an IM program), or do they have to open it separately just like they open a web browser on their computer to access the internet?2. I was wondering how Central will be marketed to the masses. It seems to me that it would require a fairly large marketing campaign to have the average Joe internet user learn about Central. Is Macromedia planning a large marketing push, or is this something that will be spread by word of mouth? Am I going to see TV commercials telling me about Central? Just curious.3. My last question is about the ease of installing and uninstalling apps. Will it be as easy as a quick uninstall button next to each app, or will they have to navigate through a set of menus to try to figure out how to get rid of some app.

  44. mike chambers says:

    >Is it setup to automatically start when they turn on their computer (Like an IM program), or do they have to open it separatelyThe user can configure it either way.>Is Macromedia planning a large marketing push,Yes.>or is this something that will be spread by word of mouth?Yes.>Am I going to see TV commercials telling me about Central? Just curious.: )>Will it be as easy as a quick uninstall button next to each appIt will be pretty straight forward, / easy.hope that helps…mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  45. Bazard says:

    There was a question asked by Peter Elstabout the security of the source code that was not answered… What kind of encryption will be used ?Will the actionscript code will be this time really safe from software such like ActionScriptViewer or any SWF decompiler ?For me it is the main problem, I don’t want to spend time my time developping something huge and find it later somewhere with a crack to use it… :/

  46. ehrm… am I going to see any TV commercials telling me about Central? : )

  47. > What kind of encryption will be usedI’d say none (aside from your payment transacrions)… SWFs are open source, just like your html docs and such. Only SWFs are harder to ‘crack.’ Any secure stuff should be processed server side.

  48. Phillip Kerman says:

    Talk about a lot of questions. Here are a couple replies:–regarding beta people getting a headstart. I’ve been on lots of betas and in many ways this is true. However, the longer you’re on the harder it is because you have to adapt to changes along the way. Plus, I’ve never seen a new app that comes out (with good docs and examples) that wasn’t picked up nearly immediately by talented developers. I think it’s balanced.–greedy apps. I think Central should have something equivalent to the Windows’ performance tab of the task manager… that’d be nice. Or, maybe just a log of internet transactions over time that can be graphed. Sort of like my web page’s stats report. Then a user could see “wow, that one app is a hog”.–right click and mouse scroll: this is basically Flash player 6 with a couple extras like SOAP…. so I don’t think that’s built in.–marketing. I would think Intel would be a good one team up with. They seem to throw around money any time there’s an opportunity to push technology. I know they were on stage at Flash Forward regarding the Centrino chipset.–how cool: everything I’ve seen and heard so far sounds very cool. At first I thought it was a great idea with a week implementation… but the screen shot I saw today blew me away. Of course there’s also all the information too.–people stealing code. Seems like a non issue if you ask me. It’s data, information, and creative ways of presentating that which makes a great app. If you want the best sorting loop it’s nearly a commodity. Not saying programmers aren’t valuable, but the real value is in the great executions. Besides, stealing is stealing.Suggestion: make an organized wiki/faq type of thing with all these questions and answers.Thanks,Phillip

  49. James Ahlschwede says:

    >>Is there going to be a registry of users – or will users have a Central unique id for me to pass data to?>I am not sure what you mean here.The larger question I’m asking if there’s going to be something like Microsoft Passport (at least as far as the universal identification aspects of it go) with Central, and if people will be able to use the universal ids for purpose of data transmission. Assuming you would have something like this, the detail I was asking about was would there be a method for looking up other user users in a directory, or would it be something like an email address, which has to be passed outside of the system person to person.>>How does Central deal with greedy apps?>As far as downloading tons of data, currently, there are no limits put in place by Central. If a particular application makes the system sluggish, or otherwise degrades performance, we expect that users will uninstall the application (similar to if you installed a regular app that did the same).>However, I would interested in hearing any suggestions on how such as bandwidth restriction could / should work.The reason I am concerned about this, is that one application can degrade the performance of another application, and the source of the problem might not be apparent. (And let’s face it, if an application runs poorly, the user response will probably be either “my computer sucks” or “Central sucks” instead of – “this new program requires system resource beyond what I can provide, I will uninstall it, and everything will be ok”. A gal I’ve been hanging out with really doesn’t like computers, mostly because she had a job where she was forced to use a very unresponsive Visual Basic Scripted DHTML interface written by Microsoft. Her opinion of computers is that they make her angry, and she doesn’t know or care who or what’s responsible, she just knows that her computing experience sucked.)If my memory serves me (and please correct me if I’m wrong – I might not be remembering this right), old Macs had “cooperative multitasking” where applications could share resources if they just played by the rules and released resources when they weren’t the active application. Of course, either no one did this or they did it poorly, and the result was Apple saying “hey, we’ve got multitasking” – allowing people to launch multiple applications at once, and when they didn’t work well people’s opinion (mine anyway) of the platform went down. (That memory of the Mac OS seems too specific too be true, so someone else please chime in if I’ve got it wrong.)As far as how would you implement something like that? Well, this obviously needs more research but that never stopped me from trying to give an answer before. Off the top of my head you generally need to do a couple of things. (Some of which, are – to me – unobvious how you would accomplish in Flash.) First of all, you’d need to overwrite all the usual functions for loading external stuff for any application within Central. (I know how to overwrite the built in functions for a specific instance of an object, but is there a way to overwrite, for example, the load function for all XML objects that will ever be instantiated – something with prototypes maybe, I haven’t needed to get into that stuff too much myself.) Well, you could either do that, or introduce new data transfer objects with Central and ban the old ones, but you’d have to probably ban the old ones to the point of scanning the files for the contraband requests and not allowing them in Central if they’re in there – if people don’t have to obey the rules they won’t.These new data transfer calls add transfer requests to the bandwidth manager instead of directly requesting the network resources. The bandwidth manager would know the total amount of bandwidth available (I’m not sure how it would know this – can the Flash Comm server make some sort of determination?), it would have an id for each running application, and well, I’m getting a amazingly simplistic and vague here, but you’d use some sort of heuristics to know if a request for data transfer should be sent (what percent of the bandwidth is being used, how many applications are requesting connections, and is an application requesting more than one transfer are the type of things you might consider) but the key would be that if the application had been greedy (used a lot of bandwidth and made other apps wait) it would have its messaging priority reduced in comparison to requests from other applications.For example, I send a request for 2 large files from my drawing program, the first file gets requested, and since I’m already making one request from the domain, it doesn’t send the other request right away. (I’d rather wait 30 seconds for one file, and then 30 seconds for the other than wait 1 minute and then get them both.) While the first file is downloading my financial application sends a request to update the value of Macromedia’s stock. Unfortunately the drawing file download is maxing out the available bandwidth (it’s my understanding that TCP will increase a connection’s transmission rate until it detects congestion and then back off – so, unless I’m missing something on a higher network layer – there’s no point in sending another request while all the bandwidth is in use.) The stock quote request gets added to the list of unsent requests. Our first drawing file download completes and now the bandwidth manager looks through the list of requests – this is where it applies all the rules that determine if a request should get sent – maybe the second graphic file gets marked down because the application id is the same as the previous transfer, maybe it gets marked down because the last request from that application blocked a request from another application – whatever the reason, the outcome we would want would be that because the drawing application just used a bunch of resources the request from the financial application gets priority. So, request for the stock price gets sent before the request for the second graphic file. The rules you would use could get very complex if you wanted including a history of transfer sizes, current application state, user preferences, how long has a request been waiting – whatever wacky rules you want to use – or it could be as simple as each application has to take round robin turns. I just shudder thinking about some laptop user who normally has a nice high bandwidth connection who takes his computer on a trip, dials up a connection on the modem and then has a hundred Central applications split the bandwidth a hundred ways – All the data would slowly populate, and it might take quite some time before anything in Central was useful at all.It’s something to consider anyway, and it wouldn’t necessarily take a lot of system resources to implement.Just to respond to the comment “Will central allow more access to system functionality, such as apple script, or windows features such as SAPI…” which you said you’d pass on to the dev team. I’d just like to say: please don’t. Actually, if I understand Central’s implementation I have no idea how you could do that, but not everything in the Flash Player is fully documented, so I still beg your restraint. It would be a good way to fragment the Central platform. It’s a strategic decision that I’m sure you all understand.Geoffrey, my good man, the Slashdot reader in me has a nit to pick with your last comment. You said:>> What kind of encryption will be used>I’d say none (aside from your payment transacrions)… SWFs are open source, just like your html docs and such.The phrase open source has a very specific (trademarked) meaning, that you can learn more about here: http://www.opensource.org/ What you’re trying to say is that the SWF format is publicly documented, which has made it easier for people to make decompilers and asset strippers. It should be noted that no data sent over the Internet is truly “unstealable” – if you’re sending it to someone so they can use it, at the very least they will have an unencrypted copy of the data when they are using it. Closed standards only give a false sense of security. For example, many musicians stream music in the Real Audio format in the false belief that streamed media cannot be saved. However, even though these are closed proprietary standards it is trivial to save the data transmitted. All the sound data has to be unencrypted, decompressed, and put in a standard format before it’s sent to the sound device that will send the sound to your speakers. So you make a fake sound device to capture the data after the software for listening to the audio has made it all nice and readable for you, the encryption and secret format make no difference because it has to be made understandable if I’m going to be able to understand it when I listen to it. (It also doesn’t prevent tape recorders held up to speakers either.) Java can be decompiled too. The fact that Flash isn’t made of special unsaveable bits shouldn’t worry you – it’s the nature of the Internet. Heck, the LZW compression in Flash 6 could be considered encryption if that makes you feel better, but I think you can see how any confidence that fact gives you is false.Securing your application from unauthorized users is another whole topic – which I won’t get into. I’ll just say that the fact that any installation of a Central application requires an Internet connection, and the fact that most Central applications will be designed to interact with data on remote servers makes everything much easier. (Maybe you can pirate the software for Everquest, but can you pirate an account?)Mike – thank you for entertaining all my long rambling questions today and answering so quickly. I think I’m the only person in your comments who hasn’t learned the fine art of brevity. Your willingness to entertain public questions about an unfinished product of this magnitude is unprecedented in my experience, and I commend you for it.

  50. Bazard says:

    Thanks Geoffrey for your post but I am still very surprised that Macromedia has not included a code to make actionscript code very hard to read and understand (by humans not machine of course) even if it is in open source. I use this solution to protect my works and it is fine for me.Anyway a solution like ActionScript Obfuscator (from http://www.genable.com/aso/ ) would be very great if it could be integrated in the next Flash MX released. I don’t think it is much hard to include it and it will really give much more credibility to secure the actionscript code against reversing and engineering attacks.Well in fact as the previous version of ActionScript Obfuscator has been bought by a software company, I really thought it was by Macromedia.If Macromedia Central allows people to try appz then I am sure they will be decompiled and the code be post in any actionscript forum. This won’t contribute to make Macromedia Central to the flash MX developpers magnet as any solutions will be found in help forums or any other Central’s cloned websites.Security of the actionscript code should be the first priority of Macromedia. How can you ask to people to sell their appz to anyone if you are not even able to guaranty the copyright… it is none sense to me. I prefer selling my appz to unique customers I work with.In my opinion, don’t expect to have genial appz if the copyright can not be protected. If Macromedia Central is only to see the next text editors or scientist calculators appz kind made in flash it is really uninteresting and with no value.Anyway I wish you good luck in this new experience, you will need it :)And finally a huge Thank You to Mike Chambers for giving all his previous time to Flash MX community.

  51. jeff says:

    Wow, all these difficult questions are putting me off thinking about Central. Here are a few more:- how does macromedia justify a 20% cut?? You really are not doing much for that cut. Even Visa and Mastercard, who provide a better infrastructure, don’t come close to that amount. I might want to use my own payment system.- is Flash the only dev environment? To be honest, it’s not a great IDE, nor a great development enviroment. Why restrict it to SWF? There are other technologies out there that are better suited to this stuff (maybe Java… heck even SVG)- how are you going to tie into the platform? I might need platform widgets, keyboard shortcuts, icons, taskbar, restricted file system access, and the list goes on. Are you going to replicate all this in every RIA that is downloaded???But to repeat the best question from above.. why will central succeed where Pointcast and Marimba failed? Java is a much better dev environment than Flash (yeah yeah I know it’s bloated but we are talking about applications here, not animations)

  52. David Sharpe says:

    I can’t wait till Central arrives. I think it will be great. I had an idea about creating a simple little app that would list upcoming athletic events for my Alma Mater. I think this is a simple app, yet could recieve a lot of appeal. Any comments?I also have a dumb question. Would it be possible to set Central as the background/ desktop on Mac OS X, or Windows? Mac users try to do this all the time. I see the desktop being like a stock trader screen, with all these info apps running in the background.

  53. Erik Westra says:

    All i want to say:i like all question and think its great that u macromedia kind of ppl are trying so good to awnseri dont like the (very) depressive minds of ppl who are only trying to think about thereselvessomething else: Why ask for more if they are allready giving u much more then u had?I hope central will be what it looks like :)Credits for all the effort.

  54. Hans Omli says:

    –right click and mouse scroll: this is basically Flash player 6 with a couple extras like SOAP…. so I don’t think that’s built in.Drat!Mike,These two basic issues are *the* reasons my customers give me for not believing Flash is capable of “real” applications–Central or otherwise. In addition, they both significantly hinder the interaction capabilities of Flash applications–especially with more advanced users. If I can’t do these in Flash soon, I’m going to be forced into evaluating another platform for many of my applications.PLEASE consider getting this into the short-term plans for both Central and Flash Player in general. Thanks!

  55. mike chambers says:

    >PLEASE consider getting this into the short-term plans for both Central and Flash Player in general.fyi, these are very high on our list, but probably won’t be implimented in version 1.0.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  56. mike chambers says:

    >Would it be possible to set Central as the background/ desktop on Mac OS X, or Windows?This will not be possible with version 1.0.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  57. mike chambers says:

    >with all the tools to see the flash source code who would buy any of the apps?Central is aimed at regular people, not just Flash developers.I can guarantee that when my mom is using a recipe app in Central, she is not going to use ASV to de compile and view the source. (unless she has been learning flash without telling me!)So, if you have super secret algorithms that you can’t risk any one else seeing, then you either need to:1. implement them on the server.2. don’t use flash.But, this applies for virtually any language, including Java and C#.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  58. mike chambers says:

    >how does macromedia justify a 20% cut?? You really are not doing much for that cut.Well, we are building the app (which will be distributed for free), setting up the entire payment infrastructure, helping promote Central and your app.That is just off the top of my head.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  59. mike chambers says:

    >Central is aimed at regular people, not just Flash developers.btw, I didn’t mean to imply that Flash Developers were not also “regular people”.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  60. mike chambers says:

    > I might want to use my own payment system.Based on the current plans, you will be able to do that.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  61. While I don’t think people ripping off code is a problem, what I fail to see is how Central opens up anything new here. You can already hack .swfs in your cache. So what if you can do that with Central too.I may be missing something but I don’t think this is connected to Central.Regarding the 20% cut. It’s easy to see if it’s worth it to you or not. Really what MM is doing is the merchant side. Naturally, they’re making your apps more legitmate by putting their name on the infrastructure, but you don’t even have to charge for the apps. For my clients I know selling the app is not going to be their #1 business model. Connecting people to their data… data that eventually brings customers back to their company (to spend money directly or otherwise). That’s what they want.Thanks,Phillip

  62. vinny timmermans says:

    Based on all the information provided above I have drawn the following conclusions about the Central concept.First of all great technology and innovative vision – the occasionaly connected app – that will be very welcomed by developers community. Macromedia did it again. Great job!Second, the whole commercial concept (try-buy etc.) has some real disadvantages to make the Central concept the next killerapp. Central in its current form will be a big container everybody can grab ideas and code from without a lot of effort. The patenting suggestion is not a realistic option for the average developer/small company. Too much hassle, too much time and too much costs. At this moment it seems that Macromedia can not guarantee any form of protection.Therefore I am wondering whether the technology behind Central will be made available outside the scope of Central applications. Will the next version of Studio Royale MX provide developers with the framework and all the tools to build ocasionally connected apps without using Central. Although I don’t expect to get an answer at this moment, I’ll give it a try 😉

  63. Bazard says:

    Well, I am sorry to insist about the code protection but as long as you will try to sell something in any business, you have to guarante the copyright or make it harder to be decompile otherwise it is opensource and free. You can not make a half-half protection.So let’s be serious and I am not talking about your mom who will never go into the code.To be well understood, I will take an example. Let’s say I make a cool app but the interface looks awful… Someone find my app usefull and decide to use my code, add new functionalities, integrate it in a much nicer user friendly interface and decide to sell it at Macromedia Central too.So here are the questions1. how do you protect code copyright ?2. Who can claims to be the owner of the code and how will you manage this case ? (I am sure it will happen)3. if as u said there is no guarante why Macromedia should take 20% of something that is virtually free ?And to finish :”So, if you have super secret algorithms that you can’t risk any one else seeing, then you either need to:1. implement them on the server.2. don’t use flash.”With such remarks I am not sure you will attract much serious developpers for Macromedia Central.We are talking about business not code party right ?

  64. Derek says:

    Regarding the 20% commission to Macromedia: Considering that the online transactions are taken care of for the developer and the potential exposure given by Central – 20% sounds great to me. I think Central will provide a great opportunity for large _and_ small-scale developers to make money from their skills and ideas.Personally, I see it allowing me to focus more on creating applications and less on promoting my apps or creating an online store.-Derek

  65. Richard says:

    “This hammer you sold me can’t drive screws.”If you’re looking to drive screws, you probably need a screwdriver, not a hammer.Regarding the 20% cut…sure it’s steep, but you’re getting built in marketing, distribution, and a secure payment processing system. You’re instantly getting your little app in front of everyone who has installed Central. Setting this up on your own would give you a greater profit margin, but you’d probably have less sales, given the difficulty of getting people out there to see it, nevermind downloading and installing it.If you think you’re better off doing it on your own, then do so.Second, it’s not Java because this thing is being made by Macromedia. If Central was being made by Sun do you think they’d support Flash files? Regardless of which is superior you can’t expect them to push a product that isn’t theirs. If you prefer Java, use it.

  66. mike chambers says:

    >With such remarks I am not sure you will attract much serious developpers for Macromedia Central.No, but this is an issue with virtually any program that is released is almost any language (java, c#, etc…). They can be hacked, decompiled, etc…> Who can claims to be the owner of the code and how will you manage this case ?If you think someone has stolen your code, then there are legal recourses for dealing with that.Again though, this isn’t a Central issue, or even a Flash issue, but an issue with releasing a program written in virtually any language.That is not to discount your concerns though, they are completely legitimate. But I just wanted to point out that this was an issue with most programs and not an issue with Central.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  67. vinny timmermans says:

    If you believe the intellectual property concerns are completely legitimate, Macromedia should put more effort to get the legal framework of Central above the current alpha or beta stage. Macromedia is very dedicated to provide the tools and technology frameworks that make life easier for their customers. What’s wrong with being as innovative and having the same attitude on other business aspects as well?

  68. Hans Omli says:

    > fyi, these [right click and mouse scroll] are very high on our list, but probably won’t be implimented in version 1.0.Glad to hear they are very high on MM’s list. Not possible for 1.0? Bummer. Hope to see them get in as close to version 1.0.0.1 as possible then. 🙂

  69. Phillip Kerman says:

    I really don’t mean to discount the code-protection side of things (although I disagree with the “either you protect it or it’s open source and free” theory).In any event, what I don’t understand is how Central has anything to do with this? Your Flash .swfs are already downloaded. Albeit to the browser cache.I just don’t quite get it.Thanks,Phillip

  70. Bazard says:

    To answer to Phillip, I know the problem of the code-protection doesn’t come from Central but from .swfBut I would like to remind you Central is supposed to be a business place. Not a forum lilke flashkit.com.Am I asking too much to just have at least a code-protection. It can comes from a Flash MX update or whatever. Plus, as I mentioned before, solutions excist and it can be easily added in Flash MX.If you people don’t mind to spend your time in building nice appz and see some malicious guys using or posting your code somewhere then it is fine. For me it is a huge problem.Making business means at least a minimum of copyright protection. See the mess in Music industry with MP3 and copyright. If you want Central to work fine, you should at least, the very least make it safe.Any software industries try to protect their codes, even Macromedia does. So why asking to people to develop in Flash MX and sell their appz if you can not protect your hard work ? It is total nonsense.PS: I am sure you are tired of reading my code-protection complain, so from now, it will be my last post. Anyway one day or another, Macromedia will have to add a code-protection, this is the natural process.

  71. vinny timmermans says:

    First of all I want you to know that I am not joining this discussion to annoy you Central people with my criticism, I spend my time on this discussion because I am a true Macromedia evangelist – great company, near-perfect tools, a bunch of enthousiastic and talented technologists and a great site. Having said that, here I go again.What really suprises me in all your – Phillip, Geoff, Mike – answers is the complete focus on technology: we take care of the technology, you take care of the rest. Although this approach may work for selling tools (Flash MX) it definitely falls short for selling solutions (Central). With Central you have entered a different ball game with different rules and a different audience. This requires another mindset and additional competences. What I really misses is a marketing mindset (“What do you want Macromedia Central to be” vs “What do you want to know about Macromedia Central”) in your approach.Let me give you another Macromedia-related example to explain what I mean. This week I received an email about the new European Macromedia store. Very nice store application build according to the latest Jacob Nielsen laws. From a technological viewpoint a great store. However, I will never buy one item from this store. Why? Because form an internet-marketing viewpoint it is a complete disaster. For example, a full Studio MX costs 999 euros in the European store. The same product in the American store costs $ 899, that’s 799 euros. I could not find a value added that justifies a 200 euros price difference. Although we Europeans may be labeled as “the old economy”, we are definitely not “the retarded economy”. So we keep shopping at the American store. What happened is that Macromedia forgot to look at one of the laws of Jeff Bezos. Experience Matters, But Price Matters More. Great technology needs to be accompanied by great marketing.I strongly believe that the group of talented developers and small companies you need to give Central a real swing, only will start allocating resources to develop Central applications when they get the feeling that the concept as a whole will be a success. Until that time you will be overloaded with a lot of useless stuff you may find on too many other sites as well, for free. I don’t think that’s what you are aiming for.

  72. Joe says:

    Just to put in a quick comment to all those that are whining about having their code downloadable, it’s never going to stop. You’ll always be able to get the code out of a flash file, whether it’s on the web, standalone, or Central. The reason? Well because the more that this goes on, the more money Macromedia makes. Have you ever wondered why Macromedia does ABSOLUTELY NOTHING about this? Because Macromedia is not in it for the developers. Never have been and never will be. They are in it for the money. Well… I could go on and on about it and it’s only too obvious that Central is just another scheme to use anothers hardwork for easy cash. It seems like a decent idea, and I’m sure quite a few of the beta testers are nicely ahead of the pack to get their foot in the door to push others out, but that’s cool too. I’m curious though, how is this going to help anybody when you can try before you buy??Here’s the deal. I download Central, install it on my comp and then go through each and everyone of the apps starting with AAAAAAAAAPsychicBosomEnhancer. An believe me, MM won’t be turning people down to get apps in there… they’d lose their %20 cut… So anyways, I download it, run it and find that I really like it. SO I take my favorite actionsript peeper and steal all the code, change the design up a bit and run it through Screenweaver so I can have my own version… then just uninstall the $59.99 AAAAAAAAAPsychicBosomEnhancer and move on to the next one. Of course thanks Mike for mentioning mommy with the recipe program, you had to mention the LEAST able person to be able to do this, but you forgot about her son who is a flash maniac and is already working on getting it rendered out of Screenweaver as we speak….That’s Central in a nutshell. 🙂

  73. Daniel Dura says:

    Joe,Although I can somewhat see your point, I think it is very much over inflated fear. The honest truth is, that if someone wants to go to all that trouble…..have at it. If someone wants to steal my stereo out of my car, it will take them approximately 10 minutes…..go for it. There are many applications I buy on the web that I could probably either write myself, or decompile. Do I? No…. I respect the developers hard work and pay them, and I know of many of my friends who do the same thing, when quite honestly they could probably decompile, crack, or even write the program themselves.Although there will always be hackers, crackers, and thieves out there, this has not and will not destroy the software industry. There are idiots all over stealing Macromedia software… but Macromedia still seems to sell enough to make a profit and run an extremely successful business. Although I believe that any app I publish will be stolen….in the end I will be fine. I will sell my app, and be paid back for my hard work. As for those who decompile the app….they are petty thieves who apparently have no respect for those who do the real work… I wish them all the luck in thier careers.

  74. Phillip Kerman says:

    I’ll try to resist adding any more analogies to this discussion.Regarding answering what Central is vs. listening to what you want it to be. Well, I’m in no position to react to your requests… but Macromedia certainly does. So, after everyone sees Central 1.0 they’ll surely have lots of improvements to suggest.I agree with Daniel regarding the difficulty level for people to rip off the code. It’s not like Central is particularly revolutionary. It’s cool because it’s well thought out and it’s in a form that will get great distribution. I could make an app that did just as much in Director or Screenweaver, but I’d have a hard time distributing it the way Central will let me.

  75. Eric Okorie says:

    umm.. i still don’t get it.occasionally connected computing has been around for a while:spyware.software updates.windowsUpdate.napster.flash modules with URLs.why is Macromedia Central different? is this just an app for internet appliances?is Macromedia Central a good name for an Internet RIA/OCC app? i thought the Internet is “decentralized”.Central implies a junction or conduit for all available information.just wondering…

  76. Bob Franz says:

    Mike,> Central is aimed at regular people, not just Flash developers.> I can guarantee that when my mom is using a recipe app in Central, she is not going to use ASV to de compile and view the source.My mom has never been to Macromedia and if this is the target audience for Cental, it is doomed to failure.My other comment:“What makes a resource truly strategic—what gives it the capacity to be the basis for a sustained competitive advantage— is not umbiquity but scarcity.“You only gain an edge over rivals by having or doing something that they can’t have or do.â€?- Harvard Business Review, May 2003What will be truly unique about what central is offering, so what there will be another 200 weather apps, 200 more news apps, 200 stock chart apps. Look at the preview screenshots for central and tell me one thing that is unique and if you have a good idea MM or a trove or other developers will flood the space to develop a better app based on your IDEA.Unless you can add something only you have access to (data, a new technology) no one will make money except for MM and a few of the “chosen” MM developers.THIS IS ABOUT SELLING MM PRODUCTS AND NOT SELLING YOUR APPS.Suckers

  77. Bob Franz says:

    Another thing I still don’t understand, If I develop a cool app in Flash:Why would I want to send them over to MM Central to view other developers apps?Why would I pay 20 percent to MM when I have paypal?Why would I inclued MM overhead in my apps? With the risk of having to share processing power?Why would I want to brand Central vs. my apps / products brand. If by chance they purchased my app when they are looking for another app why would I want them to go to Central and not my Site?If anyone is thinking of using central go find a business selling products, a business major or someone with business sense. Show them the MM offering and ask the prior questions.Think about who really gains from Central.IT WOULD SEEM THAT THIS IS A WIN-WIN SOLUTION FOR MM, YOU ARE SENDING ALL YOUR TRAFFIC TO MACROMEDIA CENTRAL, YOU ARE BRANDING CENTRAL FOR THEM, IF YOU SELL SOMETHING, YOU PAY MACROMEDIA.AND MACROMEDIA HAS ACCESS TO ALL YOUR BUYERS DATA! WHO PURCHASED YOU APP HOW MANY TIMES THEY ARE USING IT. MM CAN EVEN SELL OTHER STUFF TO YOUR CUSTOMERS!DOES THIS SOUND GOOD FOR YOU? SUCKERS

  78. vinny timmermans says:

    Central guys, wake up, swallow your pride, get some coffee and incorporate the results of all your hard work in the new Studio MX. It should be clear by now that Central is a solution for a problem that does not exist and could easily become a problem in itself. Forget about this half-baken Microsoft type of activity that will certainly harm your corporate image within your customerbase. Do what you can do best: deliver great tools and stay on top.

  79. Phillip Kerman says:

    The simple advantage Central has over selling your app directly is REACH. You get your app listed for users to find, you can assure customers your app is “safe” because it runs inside Central. Plus, you can take advantage of Central’s collaborative app concept. Instead of attempting to make the next killer app that does everything plus wash the dishes, you can make an app that’s very good at one single thing. Make it play nice with other apps and you’ve got a great platform.I think the declarations Central sucks and will ruin life as we know it are out of proportion. On balance, it’s also impossible to say this is the next industrial revolution. That is, it’s in the future… no one knows. However, I’d bet on it being somewhere between those two extremes.”a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist” Huh?Thanks,Phillip

  80. Eric Okorie says:

    Phillip.Thank you; I get it now.:) I understand.Allowing developers to focus on their specialties will bring out richer, more polished apps.This should be very interesting, especially for mobile computing applications.Eric

  81. vinny timmermans says:

    Central in it’s current form – yes, I have read all materials available at Macromedia site about Central and lots more – has too many disadvantages. Summarize all serious comments listed above and you will have to admit that the only interesting thing about Central is the technology.The rest of the concept is one big marketing blooper and must have come from someone who just failed his first marketing exam. Serious developers and companies will never use Central as their distribution platform. Why?1. They want to stay in full touch with their clients and never will let anybody else come in between.2. Macromedia has become a competitor of their own developers in the solutions industry. Do you think Macromedia will ever send the source code of Flash to Microsoft. Why do you think serious developers are different?3. The legal framework of Central has been totally forgotten. Developers are not in the business to fight legal battles. If that was the case, they would have become lawyers.Good applications are easy to sell, you do not need Central for it. Central will only get you into trouble. That’s what I meant by saying a solution to a problem that does not exist.In a very short time Central will become an expensive exchange forum of freeware-quality applications below-average developers are trying to sell. That’s the future of Central. I’ll bet on it! Does any of the Central team dares to take the challenge?

  82. Neutral Profesor of Economics says:

    Ouch Macromedia!!!This thread must be really starting to hurt your plans and the community at large since it turned sour on you and the no-response white flag from Mr. Chambers won’t do you any favours either.It would appear a many home truths have come to light and it’s about time too. I shan’t regurgitate what’s already said but let me say that I totally agree with many of the comments.All I want to say is;Macromedia, did you really expect to be able to launch this ‘evil marketplace’ without having the true nature your greedy financial model and malicious built-in product-stimulation via zero-code obfuscation?And all this under the guise of this promised ‘holy grail’ for developers of RIAs and an OCC. Please spare us the insult.The botom line:Give your developers some credit!We are not all blind MM junkies on a Flash drip.Many of us have do have commercial acumen and some of us even construct business models as well as Flash movies.Consider yourselves well and truly exposed!The question now is what are you going to do about it?John KnoxFlash Developer AND Businessman

  83. cub says:

    It appears from Mike’s latest post that he is in the process of moving from one coast to the other. That might explain why he hasn’t been replying to some of this stuff – maybe.

  84. You can’t declare Central a flop until AFTER it actually flops. That’s assumming it does. Just because you think it will doesn’t make it so.Indeed, if you can sell apps without Central then go for it. For me, the fact customers don’t have to trust me (just MM) makes it very interesting. Plus there are ways to make a collaborative app. That is, you don’t have to come up with the next “do-everything” app… just do one thing really good. And, let users share data your app manages.I can promise that some people will make useful apps with Central. Some people will also make money. You may not be that person. Also, you can ensure you’re not that person too if you have already decided it’s not worthy.What’s the benefit of pronouncing it Dead (beofore) Arival? I mean, I’m here to say things I like about it. Also, things I think can be improved. But to just write it off… seems like a fun pastime though.Thanks,Phillip

  85. vinny.timmermans says:

    Phillip, you do not need to be a prophet or strategy guru to declare a concept or idea a flop BEFORE it actually flops. If someone tells you about a new plan to sell music cd’s to deaf people, you can foresee that this idea will flop. Enjoying music requires the ability to listen. Some pragmatism, realism and common sense will do the work. The same is true for Central. Concepts like Central require a set of conditions to become a success. I have elaborated on some of them in my previous comments like trust, innovative technology and marketing power among others. I hope you understand this is not the place to go into a detailed strategic analysis and a detailed explanation of all possible Central scenarios, but I cannot see a REALISTIC scenario for a succesful Central in its current form. As I mentioned before I strongly believe that the disconnected collaborative application vision is very promising and the technology will be welcomed by developers as well as their customers and therefore should be integrated in next versions of tools and servers. That’s where I think this technology should be.However, a Central flop is not the worst case scenario for Macromedia. As this discussion makes clear Central could really hurt the corporate image of Macromedia. Until now Macromedia has a very positive image – a cool company of enthusiastic innovators, developers loved to be associated with. Central may change this all. Central may give Macromedia a totally new corporate image of a tiny Microsoft in disguise, a company of greedy guys who prefer stealing to innovating. If that scenario will come true Central will be a katalysator in alienating Macromedia from its primary customerbase.I believe the best strategy for Macromedia is to focus on building and selling the best tools, servers, components, add-ons, best-practice example applications etc. in the market that make it really easy to rapidly design and develop cool, reliable applications. That’s the best guarantee for a growing customerbase and a satisfied shareholder.PS This will be my last contribution to this discussion because I get the feeling that I start repeating arguments I have mentioned before. If i can be of any help on strategic issues feel free to contact me.

  86. Eric Okorie says:

    Actually, vinny, you do need to be guru to predict the way a product or investment will be accepted by customers before it has been tested on the market (e.g., Warren Buffet).There are two market principles that dominate: competition and market reach.::Competition::Home Depot’s service was terrible before Lowe’s Home Improvement came along. Now, Home Depot and Lowe’s are fighting for customers. Prices are coming down and the stores are cleaner with nicer people. The reason is because of competition. Another example is mainland China competing with Taiwan for laptop production (notice that your notebooks are getting cheaper and cheaper).::Market Reach::Why does everybody talk about the SuperBowl commercials the Monday after the game? Because everyone was watching the same channel! 😉 wow! talk about market reach.Soon people want information to be literally at their fingertips. Baby boomers who are retiring soon don’t want to be bogged down with their electronics devices. They want the info when they want it. They want it “Senior-Friendly”.Also, this version is Central 1.0.I am sure Central 2.0 will be better.I’m not a MM convert yet, but I have gained the necessary perspective to understand that this product is the beginning of something special.Stop the victory dance.Mark is not on the ropes.Mark is moving.*^_^*

  87. Bazard says:

    Well at least you won’t be able to complain, we have warned you more than enough.Good luck.

  88. OPEN says:

    As I’ve stated in the past Central is Win-Win for Macromedia.It’s just bad business sense for YOU the app developers to use Central.> “The simple advantage Central has over selling your app directly is REACH.”The question is who are you reaching? Consumers who would buy your app or OTHER DEVELOPERS WHO WOULD STEAL YOUR IDEA, CODE AND APP.In fact I would argue that central is the last place you want your app to be, YOU WANT GO DIRECT TO THE CONSUMER MARKET FOR YOUR APP NOT OTHER DEVELOPERS.And I have yet to see a response from MM on:>Why would I want to send them over to MM Central to view other developers apps?>Why would I pay 20 percent to MM when I have paypal?>Why would I inclued MM overhead in my apps? With the risk of having to share processing power?>Why would I want to brand Central vs. my apps / products brand. If by chance they purchased my app when they are looking for another app why would I want them to go to Central and not my Site?

  89. mike chambers says:

    Sorry for the delay in responded to some of the questions / comments. I was out of office last week:>Why would I want to send them over to MM Central to view other developers apps?I am not sure what you mean by this. You don’t have to send your users anywhere. Central is just a program that other apps run within. It has an integrated app finder, so once end users are running Central it is more likely that they will find out about your app.>Why would I pay 20 percent to MM when I have paypal?If you want to set up your own payment and try / by infrastructure, handle and process the payment, and write all of the code to ensure that the app is licensed and used correctly (as well as give up potential marketting from Macromedia), then Central is probably not for you. However, if you dont want to have to worry about all of that, and you want to focus on building a great application, then you will probably find Central useful.>Why would I include MM overhead in my apps? With the risk of having to share processing power?Verses what? You have to share processing power with any apps running on the users computer. If you are running it within the browser, you have to contend with the browser’s cpu usage.>Why would I want to brand Central vs. my apps / products brand. If by chance they purchased my app when they are looking for another app why would I want them to go to Central and not my Site?Well, there is nothing stopping you from branding your app however you want. We will have a suggested UI guideline though, so that users have a more consistent user experience (one of the primary complaints about Flash apps). This will make your app easier for users to use though since elements will already be familiar.You keep saying “go to Central”. Central is not a website, it is an application. If you want them to go to your website after they get your app, then you can redirect them there from your app.However, if the goal of your app is to drive traffic to your website, then Central may not be the best solution for you.hope that helps…mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  90. mike chambers says:

    >Do what you can do best: deliver great tools and stay on top.Actually, that is exactly what we are doing with Central.Central is a tool for end users that makes it very easy for developers to deliver and sell their apps.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  91. mike chambers says:

    > YOU WANT GO DIRECT TO THE CONSUMER MARKET FOR YOUR APP NOT OTHER DEVELOPERS.Sure. But I think you will find that most Flash developers do not have the resources to do this.Central allows them to focus on what they do best, develop apps.But, if you a a Flash Developers, with experience in marketing, and the resources to reach the general consumer, then Central may not be for you.However, I would still suggest that in most cases it is, as it would allow you to save resources in developers and marketing.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  92. mike chambers says:

    >Macromedia, did you really expect to be able to launch this ‘evil marketplace’ without having the true nature your greedy financial model and malicious built-in product-stimulation via zero-code obfuscation?John, so you think Central is a bad idea because it does not contain code obsfuscation for the Flash apps?If you need that, you can use on of the third party Flash obsfucators. Otherwise, this is an issue with all Flash apps (and apps created in other languages).So, how do you protect your current Flash applications that you create?mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  93. OPEN says:

    > if the goal of your app is to drive traffic to your website.Yes this is the goal of most companies, including Macromedia. Its called BUILDING A BRAND. Develop Applications and Services, Find Customers, Have them purchase, have them Return to YOU and YOUR site for more products and services.I noticed on the Macromedia site you don’t offer Adobe products, I wonder why?>> If you want to set up your own payment and try / by infrastructure, handle and process the payment.You don’t have to build your own… it’s called PAYPAL, c2it by Citibank is another, Achex… AND paypal is 2 percent vs. macromedias 20 PERCENT and 18 percent savings for developers.>> Sure. But I think you will find that most Flash developers do not have the resources to do this.I am not sure what you mean by this. All you need is a web page and Paypal?>> You don’t have to send your users anywhere. Central is just a program that other apps run within. It has an integrated app finder, so once end users are running Central it is more likely that they will find out about your app.”over to MM” as in connect to macromedia, and it seem that you still need to answer the question “Why would I want to send them over to MM Central to view other developers apps?”>> Verses what? You have to share processing power with any apps running on the users computer. If you are running it within the browser, you have to contend with the browser’s cpu usage.So you are saying there is zero overhead with the added Central code?>> Well, there is nothing stopping you from branding your app however you want.So you are saying there is zero branding with the Central added bar? The screenshot would seem to say otherwise. As Stated: “Why would developers want to brand Central” and essentially other developers apps?AND the most important item is that IF A APP DEVELOPER HAS A REALLY GOOD APPLICATION THAT SOLVES A NEED, IT WOLD TRAVEL THROUGH THE FLASH COMMUNITY THRU BLOGS IN A DAY. And this the the REACH that has been working great for developers prior to “CENTRAL”What I find confusing is why Macromedia is telling application/software developers to market their products one way yet at the same time they are in the same market sector and doing the opposite of everything you are saying?DEVELOPERS LOOK AT ALL THE CENTRAL SLAES POINTS AND SEE IF MACROMEDIA IS DOING THE SAME TO SELL THEIR APPLICATIONS.

  94. OPEN says:

    Some other BUSINESS reasons for not using CENTRAL.- IF you plan on licensing you application to other websites or companies using CENTRAL would most likely kill the deal or you would have to develop it again without the CENTRAL overhead.- IF you plan on selling you application to a larger company using CENTRAL would most likely kill the deal. Most larger companies would NEVER have a third party branding on their apps.

  95. mike chambers says:

    >Some other BUSINESS reasons for not using CENTRAL.Those are quite the generalizations, and I can tell you from personal experience that they are both incorrect.More info as we get closer to the Central launch.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  96. Eric Okorie says:

    Like me, I think some people may be missing the point of Central at “first glance”.If you look more closely, you will see that you have your deployment, security, market distribution, wide-spread availablity, name recognition and payment infrastructure all wrapped into one solution.From a developer’s point of view, this is very good because (let’s be honest) most programmers are only good at one thing: programming.Central streamlines the workflow after the completion of product development process. In other words, if you are a lousy programmer, like me, you cannot blame your release delays on distribution. 🙂 hehe.One quick example:Remember the “little train that could” (Casey Junior)? As it goes up the hill slowly while huffing and puffing the train says, I THINK I CAN. I THINK I CAN. This symbolizes your product development cycle.Then after the train makes it over the mountain, the train says, I THOUGHT I COULD, I THOUGHT I COULD. 🙂 This resembles your distribution of your app on CENTRAL. Quick and painless so you can spend your time doing other things like learning snowboarding or knitting.20% is not very much, especially if the distribution of the apps will be completely automated for instantaneous delivery.Customers really like that.Instant gratification.Thanks for reading.Eric Okorie”Blessed are the flexible.For they don’t get bent out of shape.”– Your Mom

  97. OPEN says:

    Mike,> Those are quite the generalizations, and I can tell you from personal experience that they are both incorrect.It’s like your saying something without saying anything, and I can tell you from personal experience that they your comment says nothing.

  98. mike chambers says:

    Thats fine. I think it was consitent with your statement.Regardless, once Central is released, there will be more info on who is building apps, and which type of apps they are building.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  99. Eric Okorie says:

    OPEN,>Why would I want to send them over to MM Central to view other developers apps?you won’t need to. MM Central app developers will steal your customers from you. (awww …. here’s a kleenex).Observation: OPEN is an ironic handle.

  100. OPEN says:

    > From a developer’s point of view, this is very good because (let’s be honest) most programmers are only good at one thing: programming.Is that why all other attempts at this type of> 20% is not very much.I can tell you don’t know that much about business. I thought Central was about selling applications and making money. If people want to just focus on developing applications, then they should work for a company doing just that.For the other developers that want to get paid for thier applications you will get raped by the Central Solution.One quick example:I post an application to central, others developers will see and steal my ideas and code (thanks to MM), MM will steal my customers, and I will make no money.

  101. mike chambers says:

    >I post an application to central, others developers will see and steal my ideas and code (thanks to MM), MM will steal my customers, and I will make no money.I don’t see how this has anything to do with Central. You concern applies to virtually any programming language or program.Scenario 1:I create an application on my website using Flash. Other developers see it an steal my code / ideas.Scenario 2 : I create an application in Java that runs in a browser. Other developers see it and steal my code / ideas.Scenario 3 : I create a standalone application in Java. Other developers see it and steal my code / ideas.Scenario 4 : I create a windows application in c#. Other developers ee it and steal my code / ideas.etc….mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  102. OPEN says:

    Mike pleas respond,> AND the most important item is that IF A APP DEVELOPER HAS A REALLY GOOD APPLICATION THAT SOLVES A NEED, IT WOLD TRAVEL THROUGH THE FLASH COMMUNITY THRU BLOGS IN A DAY. And this the the REACH that has been working great for developers prior to “CENTRAL”> What I find confusing is why Macromedia is telling application/software developers to market their products one way yet at the same time they are in the same market sector and doing the opposite of everything you are saying?DEVELOPERS LOOK AT ALL THE CENTRAL SLAES POINTS AND SEE IF MACROMEDIA IS DOING THE SAME TO SELL THEIR APPLICATIONS.

  103. Eric Okorie says:

    OPEN,>> I can tell you don’t know that much about business.I know that I would rather be fishing than worrying about deployment of my webware.I know that babyboomers want visual, easy-to-use content for their retirement years. They are tired of fighting computers.I don’t know much about business, but I know a lot about serving customer need.>>I post an application to central, others developers will see and steal my ideas and code (thanks to MM), MM will steal my customers, and I will make no money.If your code is good, then chances are that people will steal it and improve it. Then their code will be better.Then someone will steal that code.Then the code will become excellent.Your code is good. Their code is excellent. This is the nature of competition.Maybe you can propose creating a government level agency called the Department of Job Security.(awww… here’s another kleenex)

  104. OPEN says:

    Eric,> If your code is good, then chances are that people will steal it and improve it. Then their code will be better.I’m glad we agree that central developers will make no money and spend hours coding for nothing.”What makes a resource truly strategic” what gives it the capacity to be the basis for a sustained competitive advantage” is not umbiquity but scarcity. “You only gain an edge over rivals by having or doing something that they can’t have or do.”- Harvard Business Review, May 2003

  105. mike chambers says:

    >> What I find confusing is why Macromedia is telling application/software developers to market their products one way yet at the same time they are in the same market sector and doing the opposite of everything you are saying?We are not telling developers how to market anything. We are providing them additional options which do not currently exist to sell and distribute apps.There currently is not a large market for Flash developers to sell their apps to end users. This is due to a number of reaons:1. there is not an easy way to distribute applications to end users (web distribution is not always optimal).2. Most Flash developers do not have the marketting resources to communicate with end users.3. Setting up try / buy / payment infrastructure, and integrating it with your app is difficult.Central attempts to address all of these issues.>IF A APP DEVELOPER HAS A REALLY GOOD APPLICATION THAT SOLVES A NEED, IT WOLD TRAVEL THROUGH THE FLASH COMMUNITY THRU BLOGS IN A DAYSure. And that is great. But guess what… Flash Developers are only a very small segment of the potential market for applications. Plus, even then, you still run into the issues above.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  106. OPEN says:

    > I don’t see how this has anything to do with Central. You concern applies to virtually any programming language or program.Are you saying that it’s as easy to reverse engineer a .swf file as a C or Java application?Second, most companies don’t alert other developers to their product offering they go to their customer base.You are right, macromedia should focus on just making great technology and products and leave the selling part to Adobe, and you should add adobe branding to you applications for that great service, and Adobe should have access to your customer base.GREAT IDEA.

  107. mike chambers says:

    >Are you saying that it’s as easy to reverse engineer a .swf file as a C or Java application?Yes. Just go do a search for decompilers on google.If you are concerned about this, then use on obsfuscator.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  108. OPEN says:

    > We are not telling developers how to market anything. We are providing them additional options which do not currently exist to sell and distribute apps.I am not telling developers how to market anything. I am just telling them of the downside of using Central.

  109. mike chambers says:

    >I am not telling developers how to market anything. I am just telling them of the downside of using Central.Sure. That is fine. But what isnt clear to me, is how those concerns are any different than developing just in Flash (or any other language).But, I will be the first to admit, that all technologies have advantages and disadvantages. Whether the advantages outweight the disadvantages depends on your particular concerns and situation.I think it is clear that you feel the potentials disadvantages outweight the advantages. That is fine. But I think a number of other people have made it clear that they feel the advantages for them will outweight any disadvantages.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  110. OPEN says:

    > Yes. Just go do a search for decompilers on google.I suggest you decompile a swf file and a java or C file and see the result. First off Java and C don’t cache in the Temporary Files foler.THEN tell me that it is as easy to port the decompiled code.MM developers are Smarter than that.

  111. mike chambers says:

    >I suggest you decompile a swf file and a java or C file and see the result.I have.It is rather trivial to capture the code from web based apps.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  112. Eric Okorie says:

    >> Flash Developers are only a very small segment of the potential market for applications.Bingo!!Joe Beercan wants to football scores. Jane Yoga wants to find the dress in a Size 2. Joe Moneybags wants to see his grandson’s trust fund. Joe Bag-O-Donuts wants bagels for the reception this afternoon.The End-User. This is the target market.Joe Beercan can barely use his PDA or PC, let alone download a decompiler and see how we integrated the XMLthingy into the FScommesticator.OPEN, you should fire your marketing director. Things are only go downhill from now on if you don’t.

  113. OPEN says:

    > Sure. That is fine. But what isnt clear to me, is how those concerns are any different than developing just in Flash (or any other language).Developing if Flash is fine, we are talking about Central.Than MM should follow it’s own adviceMacromedia should focus on just making great technology and products and leave the selling part to Adobe, and you should add adobe branding to you applications for that great service, and Adobe should have access to your customer base.GREAT IDEA.

  114. OPEN says:

    Eric,> The End-User. This is the target market.Yes, this is the target market. and they don’t go to Macromedia. Period.My mom, doctor, non-tech friends, most computer users don’t know who or what Macromedia is or do they care.Even if they see flash files every day browsing the net.

  115. mike chambers says:

    thanks.We will take your comments into consideration.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  116. Eric Okorie says:

    OPEN,>Macromedia should focus on just making great technology and products and leave the selling part to Adobe, and you should add adobe branding to you applications for that great service, and Adobe should have access to your customer base.Acutally, that is a wonderful idea……but then, Jasc Software and ACDSystems might not like that. they would lose money. Boo hoo hoo.

  117. Eric Okorie says:

    OPEN,>>My mom, doctor, non-tech friends, most computer users don’t know who or what Macromedia is or do they care.MM has introduced Contribute, Contribute 2 which is gradually easing non-technical users into the workings of small web tasks such as editing web pages. AOL taught America how to check e-mail. Contribute will teach America how to make small changes to web content without @#$%ing-up the whole website.Soon, non-technical users will want to take this experience a step further. They will desire the ability to customize their content to every last detail, filtering out the other information they don’t want. Specialized information gathering is performed by apps. The apps are distributed by Central.People are not familiar with my KillerApp-WannaBe, but they are familiar with Macromedia who gave them Contribute.And if you tell people that the same company (whose web animation player called Flash is on 99.3% of all web browsers) is providing this product. People will already feel secure with MM’s ubiquity and curiosity and demand for apps will drive the MM Central app market.”Market research is not required for product development, but highly recommended. The sit-on-your-booty-and-make-bling-bling economy is long gone, baby.”– Anonymous

  118. mike chambers says:

    >My mom, doctor, non-tech friends, most computer users don’t know who or what Macromedia is or do they care.We will be taking steps to ensure that they know about Central. More details on that as we get closer to the release.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  119. OPEN says:

    > More details on that as we get closer to the release.I’ll change my opinion of Central when you have more details that are in more favor of the Developers.> We will be taking steps to ensure that they know about Central. More details on that as we get closer to the release.AGAIN,It’s like your saying something without saying anything, and I can tell you from personal experience that your comment says nothing.

  120. OPEN says:

    Erick,I love your use of the word IF…To all the Developers out there that are going to spend days, weeks, months making applications, “IF” is the great addition that Central will bring to you. That is, “IF” anyone makes money.And it seems that Mike is making the same point. “More details on that..”AGAIN,> My mom, doctor, non-tech friends, most computer users don’t know who or what Macromedia is or do they care.I can tell you that “My mom, doctor, non-tech friends, most computer users” will never use Contribute 2, 3, 10, or 50.AND your comparison of Contribute 2 to AOL, with sales of $40.2 billion is a Joke.> And if you tell peopleI thought that Central was going to give developers REACH to consumers, why would I have to tell people anything.

  121. Macromedia Central: Is the browser about to die?

    Simon Bisson [UK-The Guardian], looks at the future for web applications built with Macromedia Central. Central is going to give Macromedia a big challenge. Best known for its design and development tools, it now has to appeal to a new…

  122. Vishi says:

    Will the apps in central connect to data on any domain or only the domain it was downloaded from?Also, great work with all the answers.

  123. mike chambers says:

    >Will the apps in central connect to data on any domain or only the domain it was downloaded from?Yes.mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  124. Eric Okorie says:

    mike,Is Central designed for PDAs? or Pocket PCs? will Central have enterprise-level or production-level stability for use by nurses or doctors in critical situations?this also may be a silly question, but will Central have a download manager to handle interrupted downloads?thanks.eric

  125. mike chambers says:

    >Is Central designed for PDAs? or Pocket PCs?Yes. We are planning to release a version for Pocket PCs, although initially we are concentrating on Windows and OSX.>will Central have enterprise-level or production-level stability for use by nurses or doctors in critical situations?In general yes. Can you give me more info and what type of things you are looking for.>this also may be a silly question, but will Central have a download manager to handle interrupted downloads?No. Are you looking for a download manager for loading apps? or for loading data into an app?hope that helps…mike chambersmesh@macromedia.com

  126. Eric Okorie says:

    >>will Central have enterprise-level or production-level stability for use by nurses or doctors in critical situations?> In general yes. Can you give me more info and what type of things you are looking for.Sure. Looking for speed and stability.Two quick, time-critical examples:#1: A nurse, using a tablet PC, wants to find the medical history of a patient who has come in with drug overdose, in which case time is critical. Quick access to patient info with the photo ID and verification methods is essential. Finding these records should take less time than walking to a file cabinet or computer terminal.#2: A doctor wants to see how many other cases of a disease has occurred in a 24-Hour period; if they can collaborate instantly with other doctors spotting the illness, then they can quickly implement procedures to isolate the patients and stem epidemics. The really cool thing about this is that we can geographically plot the cases in real-time so we can get a quick snapshot of the situation.>>this also may be a silly question, but will Central have a download manager to handle interrupted downloads?>No. Are you looking for a download manager for loading apps? or for loading data into an app?Loading data into app. I am concerned about data integrity over lossy connections.> hope that helps…yes, it helps. thanks.Eric Okorie

  127. Jeffrey Embregts says:

    Can I compare the generated central programs to Macromedia’s Shockwave created by Macomedia Director MX?Cause this is also for off/online use.

  128. Jeffrey Embregts says:

    Can I compare the generated central programs to Macromedia’s Shockwave created by Macomedia Director MX?Cause this is also for off/online use.

  129. Jeffrey Embregts says:

    woops sorry about the double post it was my Inter Explorer..In europe the MS smartphone will be introduced soon on the market which you can run shockwave and some other files i believe, what about central applications? Anyone information about this?

  130. MX Guru says:

    I believe Macromedia has made some great decisions in the past, but lately it seems to be a bit greedy (i.e., Flash Professional?!). Macromedia, I hope, won’t turn into another conglomerate like Microsoft, and abuse the enthusiasm of it’s fans and followers. I’m already starting to feel a bit used. Well, now your thinking.. “what’s that got to do with Central?”… everything! There creating a Man/Woman made collective unconscious that will suck the creative balance from 90% of it’s contributors and leave there dead carcass behind, all the while Macromedia and the 10% (those who are fortunate enough to be friends with the right peeps) rake’n in the bucks. Oh!, never mind, that’s America, capitalism at it’s finest. Careful Macropeeps, the big foot is coming your way!

  131. Chris Velevitch says:

    At time of Flash 4, I find some really cool Flash files. As I explored various examples, I came to realise that Flash would be really great for designing and developing user interfaces. At that time, I wasn’t able to convince anyone to go with the idea as Flash 4 wasn’t really up to UI design and development (well, I guess with knowledge and experience with Flash something could been done, but at the time I didn’t).When Flash MX came out, I was able to convince the powers to be to give it a try and I was able to develop a prototype as a proof of concept, which, although was petty rough as my first atttempt with Flash, was successful. Unfortunately, the company I working for wasn’t. The writing was on the wall, so I left. Then, 6 months later, they were on the wall.With Flash Components, Flash Remoting and Flash Communications, I could see that everything was in place for real serious industrial strengh internet-based application development (aka Rich Internet Applications).With the announcement of Central, Central provides some solutions to a couple I hadn’t considered deeply (least as I understand it solving). A mechanisim for automatically updating applications and a mechanism for handling intermittant internet connections (aka Occasionally Connected Computing).With the announcement of Royale, Royale (as understand it) solves (or has the potential to solve) a number of problems I recognised as being an impediment to team-based, large-scale, enterprise application development. The ability to source-code control a Flash file, automated unit testing, automated builds and automated system testing. As I understand Royale, Flash files can be generated from the server from plain text files (XML based I believe). Thus, making it easy for a team of enterprise developers to use their existing methodologies for managing, testing and building enterprise systems.From the solid foundation of the Flash Player, I see the realm of enterprise, client/server applications moving step in new and exciting direction of Rich Internet Applications (RIA).My experience, as a developer, has always been in the development of multi-user enterprise applications. With the advent of the internet, Flash and the supporting tools and platforms, I can see my future as being very bright in the field of RIA-based multi-user enterprise applications.What about you?

  132. sami a.abulaban says:

    Hi manIam create MovieClip in actionscript and load image in this movieHow put this image scrollableI want if the image is large I wanna to show scrollbarHow can help meSami Abu-Laban

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