Archive for November, 2013

SpeedGrade 10th Anniversary Event – November 21 in Munich

Here’s an interesting fact for you: SpeedGrade was first introduced in 2003. That’s right: SpeedGrade is now ten years young this year! To mark the occasion, we are holding a special event at the ARRI theater in Munich on November 21. If you are based in, or near Munich Germany, or if you happen to be in the area next week Thursday, please join us!

Please note: most of the presentations will be in German. However, if any English-only speakers make the trek to Munich, you can sit next to me and I will do my best to give you a running translation of the presentations. In any case, we will be posting interviews with presenters and other stories about the history of SpeedGrade soon after this event.

Here is the program:

10 Jahre SpeedGrade
Modern Filmmaking and Adobe Creative Cloud

November 21, 2013 – 12:00 – 4:30 pm
ARRI Kino Türkenstraße 91, 80799 München Continue reading…

Using Direct Link with Color Presets

This week I wanted to share a video created by reTooled, showing how to work with look presets in both Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade using the new Direct Link integration.

I spoke with Josh Weiss about reTooled and the color presets they have created for Adobe Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade. Continue reading…

Getting to know Direct Link

SpeedGrade CC 7.1 introduced Direct Link, a new type of integration which connects the editing and color grading workflows. We wanted to explain what Direct Link is, how it works, and how to get the most out of this cool new feature.

Direct Link vs. Dynamic Link
With Direct Link, the whole Premiere Pro project (.pproj) can be opened in SpeedGrade. No file conversions or XML-based translations are involved; you get the complete native Premiere Pro timeline, except that it’s in SpeedGrade.

Dynamic Link works between two applications running in parallel on the same machine (and sharing the same memory). Dynamic Link is great for doing work on specific clips. You get immediate feedback and can make changes on the fly moving back and forth between After Effects and Premiere Pro while you perfect a composition within your editing project.

Color grading is rarely done this way. Although you may do several color grading passes over the course of your postproduction workflow, color work is generally done on a whole project, for example to match shots to each other or apply creative looks across scenes or an entire project. Continue reading…