Posts tagged "color grading"

Introducing Adobe Capture CC

From inspiration to asset creation: Turn any photo into a color theme, Look, vector graphic or unique brush that you can use in your creative projects.

In June, we released Adobe Hue CC, a mobile app that allows you to capture color and light as you see it, saving these dynamics as Looks to enhance your video files. Today, we’re pleased to share that Adobe Hue’s features are now available as part of a brand-new app, Adobe Capture CC, available for iOS and Android.

Adobe Capture CC combines the power and full capabilities of Adobe Color CC, Shape CC, Brush CC and Hue CC to give you the ability to create color themes, custom brushes, vector graphics and unique Looks from a single photo in a simple workflow. Check it out:

Use these production-ready assets in all your creative work. Through CreativeSync, the inspiring light dynamics, color themes, shapes and textures you capture will be instantly available to use in Premiere Pro, After Effects, Premiere Clip, Photoshop, and more. Any Looks (as well as color themes, brushes, and vector shapes) you’ve previously saved to your Creative Cloud libraries through the individual apps will be automatically available within Capture CC, so you can keep on capturing inspiration wherever it strikes.

Want a jumpstart on a unique library? Check out “Inspired by Amsterdam” created by Team Adobe using Capture CC, and download these production-ready assets to use in your video, photo, and design work:

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A Closer Look at the Lumetri Color Panel

With IBC around the corner, we are pleased to announce the key features in the next release of Adobe’s pro video & audio tools. Find out what’s coming:

Update 10/5/15: Adobe Hue CC, mentioned in this post, is now part of Adobe Capture CC, a mobile app that combines the power of Hue, Brush, Shape, and Color. Capture CC is available for iOS and Android

This past spring we brought powerful new color workflows into Adobe Premiere Pro with the Lumetri Color panel, and extended your desktop workflow with Adobe Hue, a new type of mobile app that allows you to translate color and light information from a real-life scene into a Look. Today, we are pleased to announce that this control panel is now available in Adobe After Effects, allowing you to bring your color-graded footage into After Effects with complete fidelity, and the ability to continue to tweak the color until you have exactly the look you want.

The Lumetri Color panel combines Speedgrade technologies with Lightroom-style controls, bringing color correction and grading directly into your editorial workflow. Here, we’ll take a closer look (pun intended) at the Lumetri panel to show how you can build a Look, starting with a real-life inspiration, all the way through professional color grading in Premiere Pro, and seamlessly continue your work in After Effects.

Here’s the clip from a travel show that we’re going to work with:


It’s a nice shot with great dynamic range – but rather neutral and emotionally not evocative. It’s already linear, but still rather flat looking. Let’s start by using inspiration from the real world to produce a look for this shot.

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Setting the Mood with Adobe Hue CC: Jason Levine

This post is part of a series where we challenge filmmakers to transform the atmosphere or feel of a short video clip, by using custom Looks created with Adobe Hue CC. Show us what you can do with the same footage by downloading it here.

Update 10/5/15: Adobe Hue CC is now part of Adobe Capture CC, a mobile app that combines the power of Hue, Brush, Shape, and Color. Capture CC is available for iOS and Android

Color and light have a huge impact on the art of filmmaking. They set the mood and tone (no pun intended!) of a scene, and guide our experience of the story. To illustrate this phenomenon, we caught up with Jason Levine (@Beatlejase) and asked him to use the all-new Adobe Hue CC to capture three custom Looks and apply them to the same set of video clips using Adobe Premiere Clip to see how creative looks alter the feel of a piece.

Here’s the original montage:
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Thinking Like a Colorist

Watch a replay of Robbie Carman’s Ask a Video Pro webinar to learn how you can bring creative color into your editing and postproduction workflow:

Colorist Robbie Carman began his career as an editor, so he knows both sides of the traditional divide between cutting and finishing. But he’ll be the first to tell you that the traditional divide is a thing of the past. With today’s digital workflows, powerful hardware and production tools creative work with color is much more accessible.

At NAB this year, Robbie presented a session that would have been inconceivable even just a few short years ago: “Work Like an Editor, Think Like a Colorist,” where he highlighted the new color workflows between Premiere Pro, SpeedGrade, and Project Candy. Most importantly for many filmmakers and production professionals, he showed how color can be a incorporated into everyone’s workflow – especially with the new color tools coming soon to the Creative Cloud.


Robbie kicked off his NAB presentation with a quote from Expressionist artist Vassily Kandinksy: “Color is a power which directly influences the soul.” Robbie continued, “Everything I do as a colorist, I try to live by this guiding principle.” As a speaker, he has a knack to making complex content easy and engaging.

Watch the presentation below and get inspired by Robbie’s passion – as well as a nice overview of some of the great things coming to Adobe pro video.

And if you want more Robbie (and really, who wouldn’t?) you can watch a replay of Robbie’s Ask a Video Pro session – at

What’s coming next to SpeedGrade and Creative Cloud? (Hint: it’s going to be colorful)

This year at NAB 2015 we’re taking the wraps off some really exciting new tools and workflows for video pros, including a new mobile Look capture technology, a brand new Color workspace in Adobe Premiere Pro, and Creative Cloud Library support for Looks, so you can share Looks between Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Premiere Clip. And we haven’t forgotten SpeedGrade: the next release of our professional color grading application includes support for Lumetri Looks created in Premiere Pro – meaning that every color manipulation made in Premiere Pro is rendered identically in SpeedGrade. You will also get more responsive scopes, new SpeedLooks, and general performance and stability improvements.

Our team of color geniuses has done some amazing work. When you see the release you’ll see their attention has been focused above all on Premiere Pro and incorporating the Creative Cloud and mobile workflows into the creative color process. This is all about re-inventing the ways we work with color – and making color tools more accessible, and more flexible than they have ever been. Let’s take a closer look at what’s coming.


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Behind the scenes with colorist Thomas Bergman

Recently Adobe TV posted a beautiful video created by Thomas Bergman of Silbersalz Film, a production company located in Stuttgart, Germany. The film is one of my all-time favorites: their production quality is stunning. Their work illustrates the impact of  “creative looks” on moving images, and shows the range of a professional color grading application for shaping narrative visually.

Needless to say, I am proud that the company is an all-Creative Cloud, all-SpeedGrade post house.

This interview was recorded on set at the Silbersalz facility during production on their SpeedGrade film.

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Interview with cinematographer and colorist Will Read

I spoke last November with Will Read, a brilliant filmmaker based in London and a keen Creative Cloud and SpeedGrade user. Will was one of the presenters at the SpeedGrade 10th anniversary event we held in Munich in November 2013.

UK-based filmmaker Will Read

UK-based filmmaker Will Read

In the interview, Will speaks about his integrated approach to filmmaking. His workflow was born from a bad experience with his first film project. Although he had taken great care to shoot that film well, the final result was spoiled by bad telecine work and even worse color grading. He vowed then and there never again to let someone else ruin his images. Will then set out to learn color grading on his own, so that he could marry that expertise with his love of cinematography. The ultimate result was an end-to-end pipeline which gives the maximum amount of artistic control to the minimum number of people.

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Adobe SpeedGrade: Getting Started – by Alexis Van Hurkman

We’re big fans of Alexis Van Hurkman and his fantastic introduction to the art of color grading – The Color Correction Handbook – has a special place on our bookshelf. So we were thrilled when we heard that Alexis would be writing a new SpeedGrade book for our favorite publisher, Peachpit Press.

Adobe SpeedGrade - Getting Started - Alexis Van Hurkman

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Applying Creative Looks across Multiple Clips

The power of SpeedGrade lies in the way it allows you to build up color corrections and creative looks as grading layers. Because grading layers are non-destructively applied in SpeedGrade, you can play around to your heart’s content until you get your footage looking just right.

It gets even more interesting when you add grading tracks on the Timeline. Grading tracks allow you to add a new set of grades on top of your clip-based color corrections – and they allow you to do this across multiple clips, or a whole project.

In this post, I’m going to show you how to add a grading track. Continue reading…

Adding Atmosphere with Vignettes

Vignettes are a great tool for visual storytelling. They add a depth to shots and they help give digital content a more filmic feel – and Adobe SpeedGrade CS6 offers powerful tools for creating them.

Psychologically, vignettes allow you to focus the viewer’s attention on the subject and subtly mimic the human eye, where color perception drops off around the periphery of our field of vision.

You create vignettes for an individual shot, by adding a mask to a grading layer, within a clip, or by adding a separate grading track on the timeline, for example to go across multiple clips. Colorists sometimes combine vignettes, adding atmosphere and a greater sense of space to their shots. In this post we’re going to look at how to add a single vignette to a shot in SpeedGrade. Continue reading…

Grading Secondaries in SpeedGrade

Thanks to everyone who joined us for the SpeedGrade webinar with Jeff August last week! In case you missed it, we’ll have a recording of the webinar available in a few days. In this post we’re taking a look at how to apply secondaries in Adobe SpeedGrade CS6.

Secondary color corrections are applied to specific colors within your images – as opposed to primary color corrections which affect the whole image.

For each secondary, you select a color range, and then apply adjustments to just those pixels. Secondary adjustments allow you to accent, modify, or tone down parts of your image. With SpeedGrade, secondary color corrections are added as individual grading layers within the overall grade. Continue reading…

Upcoming: SpeedGrade webinar for editors

Please join us for SpeedGrade for Aspiring Colorists, a special webinar on August 16, starting at 10:00 am PST.

If you are an editor, and you want to learn about color grading, this course if for you. The session will start with a review of the color tools in  Adobe Premiere Pro and then move on to provide a primer in the powerful color correction and look design capabilities of Adobe SpeedGrade CS6. Continue reading…

Extending SpeedGrade with SpeedLooks

SpeedGrade CS6 has been out for a few months now and we’re already seeing some great third-party additions. SpeedLooks, created by LookLabs, are a great example, and help to illustrate the power of color grading to dramatically transform your images.

I chatted with colorist Jeff August of LookLabs recently to learn more – quick plug: Jeff will be giving an online seminar on color grading for video editors on August 16

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Color Correction Basics – Working with the Waveform

Most color grading workflows include two types of tasks: color correction and look design. Look design is what you do to give your story its individual character: it’s the visual style that communicates mood and place.

For example an action film might have a gritty, de-saturated look; a horror story might have a cold blue otherworldly look, a period piece might have vibrant colors, like a painting or an old color photograph. Different scenes within a film usually use slightly different palettes. In short, look design is a part of storytelling Look design is a very exciting aspect of the new digital filmmaking tools: we never had as much freedom as we do now to define how we want our productions to look.

Before you get to detailed look design, you will usually want to begin by color correcting your shots. Continue reading…

A Quick Look at the SpeedGrade Look Panel

The Look panel is where all the fun happens in SpeedGrade. This is where you apply color corrections and design your look: the two parts of most color grading workflows.

Color correction, sometimes called the “technical grade,” is about making your shots look good and matched.

The creative part of grading is where you give your project its distinctive visual style. Here in SpeedGrade-Land we usually refer to this as “look design.”

To open the Look panel, make sure you have a clip selected on the Timeline (see Four Ways to Load Footage in SpeedGrade for more info). If a clip is not selected, the Look panel tab will remain inactive and you can’t open it. Continue reading…

SpeedGrade – A Little Bit of History

The origin of SpeedGrade can be traced back to a playback application called FrameCycler, which was first release by IRIDAS in 2001. FrameCycler provided uncompressed playback of frame sequences and was widely adopted in the visual effects community where artists needed an easy way to check their work.

In a recent interview on Animotion (great site, by the way), Lin Kayser, the founder of IRIDAS tells the story. As Lin points out in that interview FrameCycler employed the pixel shader technology in GPUs to provide LUT support in FrameCycler. Pixel shader technology is widely used in gaming to provide really fast screen refresh rates, but is not commonly used professional color applications. Continue reading…