Posts tagged "Looks"

Setting the Mood with Adobe Hue CC: Jason Levine

This post is part of a series where we challenge filmmakers to transform the atmosphere or feel of a short video clip, by using custom Looks created with Adobe Hue CC. Show us what you can do with the same footage by downloading it here.

Color and light have a huge impact on the art of filmmaking. They set the mood and tone (no pun intended!) of a scene, and guide our experience of the story. To illustrate this phenomenon, we caught up with Jason Levine (@Beatlejase) and asked him to use the all-new Adobe Hue CC to capture three custom Looks and apply them to the same set of video clips using Adobe Premiere Clip to see how creative looks alter the feel of a piece.

Here’s the original montage:

Look #1: Desert Sunrise

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When & Where did you capture this Look?

This look was captured in Las Vegas, Nevada at approximately 6:15am, in April 2015.

What inspired you to create the Look?

There’s simply nothing like a desert sunrise, a true feeling of rebirth and resurgence, particularly during spring. On this particular day, amidst beautiful reflections from the adjacent hotel, I stood in awe… and then snapped the shot.

How does the Look change the story or feeling of the video clip?

Naturally, there’s a sense of ‘warmth’ that is immediately added to the video…but it’s more. It feels like ‘a beginning’, and this is where the ‘time of day’ essence (and brilliance) of Hue CC really shines. It not only makes the scene ‘feel’ warmer, brighter…but it feels like morning.

Is that what you intended or expected when you captured the Look?

It produced the result I expected, however, I was equally impressed to see that it really carries the essence of that original time and place, regardless of what footage it’s applied to (sometimes with subtle tweaks, but often, as-is).

 

Look #2: Sandstorm

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When & Where did you capture this Look?

This look was captured in Las Vegas, Nevada at approximately 5:15pm, April 2015 (and curiously, it was later in the same day as the previous look, ‘Desert Sunrise’).

What inspired you to create this one?

Living in the desert myself, I’m no stranger to sand storms and dust storms. This particular one, however, came about very quickly and almost immediately darkened and clouded the entire city. There was so much wind that I wasn’t able to grab a clear shot whilst on the ground, so this image was once again captured from my window inside my hotel room.

How does this Look change the video clip?

In the case of this Look, it really adds more drama and dimension to the video in question. It feels darker, more mysterious. It creates a moodiness and atmosphere that is totally opposite of the previous example. And by tweaking the shadows/highlights and exposure in Clip (on the original footage), I was able to give it a little more contrast and dimension.

What did you expect when you captured this Look?

I was curious how this Look would perform on the Seashore clip. One of the benefits of Adobe Hue CC is that the Looks created will never completely de-saturate, so while the primary tones of the Look were nearly monochromatic, it leaves behind enough essence of color to just add to this creepy, moody feeling. And again, because you can always go back into the Look itself and alter the intensity and primary hue angle, I was able to achieve a cinematic ‘darkness’ instantly, with footage that was shot in a bright, clear environment.

Look #3: Spring SouthwestLook3_0190

When & Where did you capture this Look?

This Look was captured in Phoenix, Arizona at approximately 12:00pm, late March 2015.

What was the inspiration for this Look?

While people are accustomed to the earthy red and brown tones of the desert, some are unaware that there’s also a lot of green…and blue sky is almost a daily occurrence. This particular day seemed to have the perfect combination incredibly vivid blues and greens (with a hint of desert brown).

How do you think this one impacts the clip?

Based on the midtone shift that I selected when I was creating this Look, once applied to the video clip, it really emphasizes the blues and greens at the beach; the water sparkles, the plant life thrives, and you can definitely sense that this isn’t early morning nor late in the day…it once again, ‘feels’ like a mid-day shot, clear and vibrant.

What did you think you’d get when you captured the Look?

I was concerned that the blues might be accentuated too much; this is again where the Intensity slider came into play (along with auditioning this on the footage in question, right inside the app, to find a good balance). It definitely ‘cools’ the image (without feeling too blue) but more importantly (and shockingly) is that this particular example Look really carries that ‘time of day’ stamp with it. As mentioned above, you know it’s not morning. And it feels like Spring, somehow…

 

So, if you were going to make this video clip into a movie, which of these Looks would you want to use?

For a long form piece, I’d probably go with the Sandstorm Look; it has a very cinematic, dark feel…and with the ocean sounds behind it (and some slow, building underscore) it effortlessly creates a sense of drama and interest.

What do you think of Adobe Hue?

Adobe Hue CC is a fantastic way to apply your own visual memories of color and light, time and day, directly to your video content. It’s a great way to get started with color and grading, and the simple implementation of the app itself gives the user a truly infinite palette of color presets, right from their camera phone.

What are your suggestions for people who want to use Adobe Hue?

Try it for yourself; it can amaze you. The fact that we’re actually creating 3D LUT files gives the power user a lot of flexibility; and for new users, it is once again a unique way to have color presets ‘built’ for your video, based on places and images of color and light that you’ve personally experienced. And that’s what we try to do with our stories…share our personal experience, our connections to place in time, the look of feel of that place in time, and this is precisely what Adobe Hue CC delivers.

Thanks for chatting, Jason!

 

Want to accept Jason’s challenge? Download the same video file Jason used and alter it using a Look from Adobe Hue and Premiere Clip. Publish & Share your video with #AdobeHue and #MadeWithClip for a chance to have your workflow featured!

See Jason take this video to the next level by bringing his #MadeWithClip project and Looks from Adobe Hue into Adobe Premiere CC 2015:

 


About Adobe Hue: Adobe Hue CC is a new kind of app that allows you to capture color and light dynamics from real-world experiences, either live with your device’s camera, or from an image you have saved in your camera roll or Creative Cloud account. Looks you capture with Adobe Hue can be brought into Premiere Clip, Premiere Pro, and After Effects to immediately transform your video footage, whether you’re a color grading specialist or new to the process.

2015 release of SpeedGrade CC available now

The Adobe SpeedGrade CC (2015) update is available as part of your Creative Cloud membership. This update includes a number of new features and enhancements.

As described in our NAB Reveal blog post, the focus in this release was on color workflows, including the new Lumetri Color in Adobe Premiere Pro and our new mobile Look capture app, Adobe Hue CC. With SpeedGrade itself, the priorities for this release were on performance and compatibility with the new Lumetri color tools in Premiere Pro.

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New Color Workflows in CC 2015

Introducing Adobe Hue CC

We’re pleased to announce that “Project Candy” is not just a project anymore. Today, Adobe Hue CC, our new Look capture app, is available on the Apple App Store. We were thrilled with response to Adobe Hue when we first revealed the technology at NAB and we’re even thrilled-er now that it’s available to everyone! We hope it opens new doors to color for you and we truly can’t wait to see what you do with it.AdobeHueCC_logotype[1]

What is Adobe Hue CC?

Let’s be clear right up front: Adobe Hue CC isn’t just a new app; it’s a new kind of app. Similar to other Adobe “capture apps” like Shape and Brush, it allows you to grab elements from the real world in a format you can use right away in your creative work. Where Shape captures the outlines of things, and Brush captures textures, Adobe Hue captures color and light which it saves as Looks– files you can use to enhance the appearance of video content.

Adobe Hue CC is a fantastic entry-point into the new color 2015 workflows. The Looks you create with Adobe Hue are automatically added to your Creative Cloud libraries and, thanks to Adobe CreativeSync, available to use within Adobe Premiere Pro CC (2015), After Effects CC (2015), and Premiere Clip.

 

How does Adobe Hue work?

Rather than snapping a picture, Adobe Hue creates a snapshot of just the color and light in a scene. As soon as you point it at something (or load an image from your Camera Roll or Creative Cloud folders), you will see a slowly rotating array of colored balls. This shows you the distribution of color and light available in that scene (or photo).

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Horizontally, the colors are arranged around the rotating axis in the same positions you would find them on a traditional color wheel. The vertical axis shows the amount of light: Darker tones are lower down in the image, the lighter ones higher up. If you are familiar with a 3D Histogram, you will see the similarities with the Adobe Hue capture screen.

After you tap the capture button, a simple edit screen opens where you can make two decisions.

  • Accept (or change) the midtone-shift for your Look
  • Accept (or adjust) the intensity of the Look

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The reference image in the top half of the screen shows how the Look impacts the image. You can tap and hold the reference image to see the “before” (without the Look) and compare that to the image with the Look applied.

Tap any color ball to make it the midtone (a small highlight ring shows you which one is selected). Changing the midtone shifts the whole Look, so the impact can be pretty significant, especially on neutral tones in the target image. The slider lets you make the whole Look stronger or more subtle.

Once you like it, tap Save and the Look is saved to your library where the magic of Adobe CreativeSync makes it available to use in Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Premiere Clip.

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How do Looks work?

A Look is not a filter: it does not subtract colors from your target image. Nor is it an overlay of any kind. A Look is actually a complex set of saturation adjustments that shift color and light across the whole picture. The results are richer video images with a distinctive visual style.

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Whether you are new to working with color, or an old hand at grading, Adobe Hue CC gives you a great place to start: capture experiences from the world around you and bring those emotional qualities right into your video projects. The impact is immediate. And you don’t have to stop there: open up the new Lumetri Color panel in Premiere Pro to make additional adjustments until you have exactly the Look you want. Want to bring the whole thing into a dedicated color grading environment? You can use Direct Link to open your Premiere Pro project in SpeedGrade.

Like the other color tools being introduced in the 2015 Creative Cloud releases, Adobe Hue CC is all about opening the doors to new ways of working with color.

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Ready to get started with Adobe Hue?

DOWNLOAD Adobe Hue CC from the App Store

LEARN how to capture custom Looks and apply them to your video projects

CHECK OUT the mobile and desktop workflows available with Adobe Hue CC

VISIT the Adobe Hue Help pages and Community Forum if you have questions

 

Adobe Hue CC is a free app that syncs with your Creative Profile through your Adobe ID. It is currently available for iPhone and iPad devices running iOS 8 and later.

 

Thinking Like a Colorist

Watch a replay of Robbie Carman’s Ask a Video Pro webinar to learn how you can bring creative color into your editing and postproduction workflow: bit.ly/1FFTy5R

Colorist Robbie Carman began his career as an editor, so he knows both sides of the traditional divide between cutting and finishing. But he’ll be the first to tell you that the traditional divide is a thing of the past. With today’s digital workflows, powerful hardware and production tools creative work with color is much more accessible.

At NAB this year, Robbie presented a session that would have been inconceivable even just a few short years ago: “Work Like an Editor, Think Like a Colorist,” where he highlighted the new color workflows between Premiere Pro, SpeedGrade, and Project Candy. Most importantly for many filmmakers and production professionals, he showed how color can be a incorporated into everyone’s workflow – especially with the new color tools coming soon to the Creative Cloud.

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Robbie kicked off his NAB presentation with a quote from Expressionist artist Vassily Kandinksy: “Color is a power which directly influences the soul.” Robbie continued, “Everything I do as a colorist, I try to live by this guiding principle.” As a speaker, he has a knack to making complex content easy and engaging.

Watch the presentation below and get inspired by Robbie’s passion – as well as a nice overview of some of the great things coming to Adobe pro video.

And if you want more Robbie (and really, who wouldn’t?) you can watch a replay of Robbie’s Ask a Video Pro session – at bit.ly/1FFTy5R

What’s coming next to SpeedGrade and Creative Cloud? (Hint: it’s going to be colorful)

This year at NAB 2015 we’re taking the wraps off some really exciting new tools and workflows for video pros, including a new mobile Look capture technology, a brand new Color workspace in Adobe Premiere Pro, and Creative Cloud Library support for Looks, so you can share Looks between Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Premiere Clip. And we haven’t forgotten SpeedGrade: the next release of our professional color grading application includes support for Lumetri Looks created in Premiere Pro – meaning that every color manipulation made in Premiere Pro is rendered identically in SpeedGrade. You will also get more responsive scopes, new SpeedLooks, and general performance and stability improvements.

Our team of color geniuses has done some amazing work. When you see the release you’ll see their attention has been focused above all on Premiere Pro and incorporating the Creative Cloud and mobile workflows into the creative color process. This is all about re-inventing the ways we work with color – and making color tools more accessible, and more flexible than they have ever been. Let’s take a closer look at what’s coming.

 

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Using Look Presets in SpeedGrade

Happy New Year, everyone! Let’s start off 2013 by taking a look at Looks.

SpeedGrade CS6 ships with four collections of .Look file presets which you can use right out of the box (so to speak), or as a starting point for building your own looks. The four sets  are called Cinematic, Desaturation, Style, and Temperature. Each of the folders includes eight Looks, for a total of 32.

The SpeedGrade Look presets, along with any new Looks you create yourself, are displayed in the Look browser at the bottom of the Look panel. After loading content, close the Desktop (D) and click on the Look tab to open the Look panel. Continue reading…