We’re here now! #TeamAdobe at #NAB2014

Today the Adobe pro video team kicks of our presence at the 2014 National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show in Las Vegas.  NAB is the biggest North American tradeshow of the year for us and we’ve been looking forward to this for months.

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The product teams have been working tirelessly on all the new features that were revealed last week and we can’t wait to show them to you.  If you’re coming to NAB,  be sure to stop by and say hello at the Adobe booth (SL3910 – in the Lower South hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center). Check out all the new updates at the demo pods and ask questions. We have a packed schedule  on our main stage too, where you can get presentations on what’s coming next to Creative Cloud for video and see some of the fantastic things other filmmakers, post houses, and broadcasters are doing with the Creative Cloud tools (hint: if you want to see AMC’s Walking Dead zombies, come by to see Sam Nicholson from Stargate Studios).

Speaking of customers, Meagan Keane was lucky enough to moderate a really engaging keynote panel “Breaking the Rules: The Next-Gen Content Creator” at the Post Production World last weekend where customers Ryan Connolly [Film Riot/Triune Films], Kanen Flowers [That Post Show/That Studio] and Peter Salvia [YouTube Nation] talked about the next generation of media creation and bypassing traditional broadcast outlets.  Stay tuned for more on the keynote and a highlight video coming soon.

In addition to the Adobe booth at NAB – where attendees can see all the goodness coming soon to Adobe Creative Cloud for video – they can also find Adobe Creative Cloud and specifically Adobe Premiere Pro being demoed in over 130 partner booths across the NAB show floor.   The partner ecosystem is an integral part of bringing the fastest, most powerful, most streamlined workflows to Premiere Pro customers so its an incredibly big point of focus for the Adobe pro video team.

And there’s so much more to come! The one and only Al Mooney will be presenting at the Las Vegas Supermeet later this week, and we’ll be interviewing product team members and customers. If you’re not in Vegas, we’ll bring Vegas to you – all week long. Be sure to stay tuned to the “NAB 2014” Channel on Adobe TV  for all the latest from the show!

Don’t worry if you can’t make it to NAB: we haven’t forgotten you…  We’re presenting a special Ask a Video Pro session on Thursday, April 10 at 10 am PT demoing the latest innovations coming to the Creative Cloud video apps like Premiere Pro and After Effects. Register for free for “What’s coming next in Creative Cloud for video” a one-hour overview with Q&A presented by Jason Levine.

And short demo videos of the top new features coming soon can be found here:

Premiere Pro CC Bug Fix Update (7.2.2)

Today we are releasing an update to Premiere Pro CC. This version (Premiere Pro CC 7.2.2) contains a number of important bug fixes and is recommended for all users. Please note that this release does NOT contain the extensive new features recently revealed as forthcoming; more information on when Adobe Creative Cloud members can expect to see that major update will be coming soon.

Users can install this update directly from the Creative Cloud desktop application.

A list of notable issues resolved in this release appears below.

  • Audio could drop out during playback.
  • Red frames were sometimes seen on export, particularly with XDCAM HD 422 smart rendered exports.
  • Older AMD GPUs were showing performance degradation, sometimes significant.
  • Erratic playhead behavior was observed when scrubbing in the Timeline in Mac OS X 10.9.x.
  • Rendering a sequence could cause red frames to be generated with XDCAM HD 50 clips with Preview Rendering Setting of XDCAM HD 50 NTSC 1920×1080.
  • XDCAM HD 422 QT files were sometimes not decoding properly.
  • Performance issues were seen when working with growing files.
  • The Locate Media dialog could not open with the correct location even though the “Path:” field started with a valid initial guess for location.
  • Transitions on speed-changed multicam clips were removed when flattening.
  • Multi-camera previewing could go black in Program Monitor when the selected camera did not extend to the current playhead position.
  • Timeline clips’ FX badge popup menu (Motion, Opacity, Time Remapping) could be difficult to open.
  • Multicam Sequences could move in the timeline when flattened if they had speed changes applied.
  • Source settings were not accessible from a Merged clip created from a R3D / RED video clip.
  • Smart rendering Canon XF files could result in stalls during the export
  • Transitions were erased from multi-camera sequences after flattening.
  • Some growing XDCAM files could play back with unwanted artifacts.
  • The order of effects applied to a multi-camera source sequence could reverse after flattening.
  • The display could go to energy saving mode during long periods of playback.
  • Spanned CanonXF media on an XSAN could import incorrectly.
  • Duplicate bins were created for each sequence imported from a single project.
  • Project import could take a long time if the project being imported contained offline media.
  • Occasional hangs occurred when adjusting volume in the Clip Mixer.
  • Marque selection in the Project Panel sometimes selected items in the incorrect order.
  • Double-clicking in the Project Panel when in list view could invoke the Import dialog unexpectedly.
  • Audio from P2 media could import incorrectly.
  • Export To Tape could exhibit issues if a file was growing at the same time.
  • Red Rocket failures could sometimes occur with 16:9 media.

 

 

Revealing the next major Premiere Pro CC update

As video production workflows and requirements are constantly changing and evolving, so is Creative Cloud, with regular feature-rich releases which allow creative people to stay at the very cutting edge. Today, we are extremely excited to be able to reveal the next major update of Premiere Pro CC, which accompanies reveals of all other Adobe video and audio products, including Prelude, After Effects, Speedgrade, Media Encoder, and Audition. The update will be available to Creative Cloud subscribers in the coming months.

The next release of Premiere Pro CC brings multiple features and performance enhancements designed to allow editors to work fluidly with the highest resolution media, achieving brilliant results faster than ever before, without leaving their editing environment.

Live Text Templates allow Premiere editors to work with After Effects comps containing text (such as lower thirds) making changes to the text without ever having to leave Premiere Pro. All animation and effects from After Effects remain in place, with only unlocked text fields being edited.

Also, editors increasingly need to be able to create masks and track them, often so that they can easily blur out a moving portion of a frame, like a face or license plate. This release brings full feathered Masking and Tracking capabilities to all effects in Premiere Pro, allowing editors to quickly place an effect mask over a portion of a frame, track it, and feather it. When more finesse is required, simply jump into After Effects for greater control.

Premiere Pro’s rich support for workflows in 5K and beyond is further enhanced, with new native support for CanonRAW and Sony SStP media. Enhanced CinemaDNG support (including Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, Convergent Design Odyssey7Q, and CinemaDNG source settings), and a powerful new workflow for the ARRI AMIRA camera, where appropriate LUTs are applied on ingest at the master clip level are also available. Editors working with RED media will benefit greatly from the ability to debayer on a supported GPU, providing amazing playback performance up to full-resolution real-time playback on a workstation-class system.

The all-new Master Clip Effects feature provides a brand new, extremely powerful effects workflow. Any effect can now be added to a Master Clip, and any adjustments made at the Master Clip level will ripple down through to all clip instances used within sequences, allowing rapid changes to entire scenes.

The Premiere Pro team continues to pride itself on engaging with the editing community and solving modern workflow problems in powerful new ways.  We’re thrilled to be able bring you these amazing new features soon.

Check out these videos to see the all the top new features in the Creative Cloud video apps in action:

Premiere Pro Overview video
After Effects Overview video
SpeedGrade Overview video
Audition Overview video
Media Encoder Overview video

All the other new features in this release are listed below – we can’t wait to let you get your hands on it.

  • Intel Iris architectures are supported for Mercury OpenCL.
  • Full support for browsing After Effects projects in the Media Browser has been added, and effects compositions within an AEP can be previewed.
  • Users can specify a number of frames for the step forward/back command.
  • Media Browser project browse has been significantly improved for multi-project workflows.
  • A new progress bar appears over the Premiere Pro icon on the Mac OS X dock or Windows taskbar displaying render progress.
  • A new Track Select Backwards tool has been added.
  • An option to show transparent/alpha elements of a frame as a gray and white grid has been added.
  • A preference has been added to maintain audio pitch on scrub and shuttle.
  • The Cross-Dissolve transition is now preset capable.
  • Lens Distortion Removal presets have been added for Go Pro and DJI cameras, and the Lens Distortion Removal effect has been ported to Mac.
  • Multiple transitions can be selected at once and their durations altered simultaneously.
  • Red Giant Pluraleyes workflows have been improved.
  • Several issues with AAF export have been resolved.
  • A Reverse Match Frame command has been added.
  • Significant improvements have been made to effects and transitions parity between Windows and Mac.
  • ‘Favorites’ can now be created and navigated to in the Media Browser.
  • Double-clicking a track item in a sequence will automatically perform a match frame to the playhead position when it is parked on a frame within that item.
  • Typekit support has been added to Premiere Pro, allowing quick access to the Typekit website from the Title menu.
  • A preference has been added to allow a user’s most recent autosave file to be automatically backed up to Creative Cloud.
  • Comment names are displayed in the Marker panel.
  • All video and/or all audio tracks can be locked or unlocked with an assigned keyboard shortcut.
  • An Export command has been added to the contextual menu for items in the Project Panel.
  • Sequences in the Timeline or Project Panel can be made offline with a right-click.
  • A keyboard shortcut can be assigned for the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog.
  • Sound roll/Sound timecode can be used in an EDL export.
  • Audio clip volume keyframing can be nudged up and down with assignable keyboard shortcuts.
  • Scratch-disk workflows have been improved, both when moving between platforms and when the previous scratch disk is offline.
  • Searching and sorting in the Project Panel has been made dramatically faster.
  • A new Set To Frame Size command has been added, preserving the full resolution of media without rasterizing (as with Scale To Frame Size).
  • A new popup has been added to audio track headers to allow fast Voice Over recording configuration.
  • Dolby Digital and Dolby Digital Plus (stereo only) can be encoded on export.
  • The fx badges on track items have been moved to the left of the name, and can now be disabled.
  • More than one keyboard shortcut can be assigned to a single command.
  • Improvements have been made to AVCi growing files performance.
  • An option has been added to not consolidate duplicates on import.
  • Manual sync offsets can be committed to a new Project item.
  • SCC or MCC caption files can be created without needing to create accompanying media.
  • Effects are preserved when using the Flatten Multicam command.
  • An option has been added to create a new folder when a sequence or XML is imported.
  • The Mosaic effect has been GPU optimized.
  • Assignable keyboard shortcuts have been added for toggling audio and video track outputs.
  • A preference has been added to disable automatic import of embedded closed caption streams.
  • Users can export to AS11 content packages.
  • Users can export to certain types of Quvis Wraptor DCP packages.

Join us on April 10th for a special online event to see all these new features in action,

To see a big sneak peek of all of the new and exciting things coming in Adobe’s professional video and audio applications and services, go here.

Because we’re just revealing these features now, you won’t yet have access to them through Creative Cloud, but you can make sure that you get them as soon as they’re available by subscribing now. If you join Creative Cloud before 30May2014, you can take advantage of our special promotional offer. See this page for details.

For more information about Creative Cloud, see this overview video and the Creative Cloud FAQ list.

What’s coming next in Adobe Prelude CC

Well, it’s that time of year again when we are excited to come out from behind closed doors and show you what our team has been heads-down working on for the past several months – the next major update of Prelude CC.  It has been a great year for Prelude, with it really coming into its own as a product.  We have seen a real upswing in the adoption of Prelude as the Ingest, Logging, and Rough Cut solution in the post-production world.  This has been especially true among news and sports productions, and we expect our new features to continue to add to this momentum.  We are also continuing to look at ways of increasing Prelude’s appeal to a broader market with optimized workflows, features, and utilities, like Adobe Prelude Live Logger .  Our goal with this release was to improve the efficiency and intuitiveness of key workflows within the application.  So let’s take a look at the new features!

Dramatically speed up shot logging by using the new Tag panel to create customized tags you can add with a single click as you review your footage. Enrich your media with metadata without typing—or typos. Save Tag templates for sharing between machines and users, or to re-use on new projects.

Each Tag applied appears as a comment marker  in on the Timeline, populated with a Tag Name and Description specified by the Tag Template button selected. All tags are fully searchable across Prelude (Project Panel, Timeline, Marker List Panel) and will also be fully searchable in the  Adobe Premiere Pro CC Project Panel.

A streamlined rough-cut workflow now lets you generate assembly edits with drag and drop ease, and new trimming with mouse and keyboard shortcuts automatically applys ripple trims directly in the Prelude timeline for basic editing.

Keyboard Shortcuts:

  • Trim In Point of Selected Clip to CTI (Q)
  • Trim Out Point of Selected Clip to CTI (W)
  • INSERT Clip(s) at the PREVIOUS edit point ( , )
  • INSERT Clip(s) at the NEXT edit point ( . )
  • SELECT CLIP at Playhead ( D )
  • MOVE CLIP(S) LEFT ( [ )
  • MOVE CLIP(S) RIGHT ( ] )

Ingest panel enhancements give you more control when copying your media. Set custom values for auto increment renaming on ingest, and preview the transcoding duration and resulting file size of any shots you select for transferring and copying.

Apply File Metadata to All Destinations during ingest.

Project panel enhancements enable faster handling and organization of project items.  New sorting options make it easier to stay on top of large projects.  Use the Subclip Only view to quickly filter the Project panel down to the essentials.

Cycle through clips quickly for review and logging using keyboard shortcuts, Alt + P (Open Next Clip) and Alt + O (Open Previous Clip).  Drag and Drop clips to the New BIN icon to create a new bin with the selected items automatically added.

We are excited to introduce these new features and enhancements for our next release.  Many of them are in direct response to customer feedback and feature requests, so thank you for helping us make Adobe Prelude a better product!

Premiere Pro CC on the new Mac Pro

There has been a lot of confusion and misinformation recently about how well Premiere Pro CC runs on Apple’s latest professional desktop machine, the new Mac Pro. I’m happy to say that, due to the meant-to-be combination of the Mercury Playback Engine and the immense power of the hardware, you can expect absolutely phenomenal performance. In this video, our man Dave Helmly takes you through just what it can do (and there’s even a surprise at the end, so if you ever work with RED media, I suggest you watch the whole thing).

Newly supported GPUs in Premiere Pro CC 7.2

The Mercury Playback Engine is built to leverage modern system resources as much as possible, and working with a supported GPU gives the ultimate performance. With the latest release of Premiere Pro CC (December 2013), several new GPUs have been added to the supported list. This includes the AMD GPUs found in the new Mac Pro from Apple (note that dual GPUs are supported for export, and one is used when playing back). EDIT: please note that dual GPU support for export is not limited to the Mac Pro, but any system with multiple GPUs).

Below is the list of newly supported GPUs. Full information about the December 2013 release can be found here.

Win CUDA:
NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M
NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN
NVIDIA Quadro K1100M

Win OpenCL:
AMD Radeon R9 290

Mac OS CUDA:
NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M

Mac OS OpenCL:
NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M
AMD Radeon HD FirePro D300
AMD Radeon HD FirePro D500
AMD Radeon HD FirePro D700

Premiere Pro CC Update (7.2.1)

Today we have released an update to the December 2013 Premiere Pro CC release, with several important bug fixes. This update is recommended for all users. You can install the update through the Creative Cloud desktop application, or you can check for new updates from within any Adobe application by choosing Help > Updates. Ideally, you should install the updates automatically through the Creative Cloud desktop application or by choosing Help > Updates, but you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Windows or Mac OS. Note that if updates aren’t visible in the Creative Cloud app, quitting and relaunching may help.

issues fixed with this release:

  • Intermittent Buzzing could occur on audio playback where audio transitions were present
  • Reveal in project sometimes did not work in imported sequence when clips were present in the project
  • Premiere Pro could occasionally crash on playback of certain multi cam assets
  • Using matte cleanup tools in Ultra keyer could sometimes cause the top half of the image to disappear when paused in Open CL mode
  • Autosave could sometimes interrupt playback.
  • The AMD Radeon R9 290 Series has been added to the OpenCL supported card list
  • Inserting a merged clip with in/out points via menu or command would insert the entire merged clip, not the in/out range
  • Playing with preroll could sometime crash Premiere Pro
  • When editing in Anywhere mode, adding synthetics would sometimes show a 10 digit number under the progress panel’s Name column

Issue with Premiere Pro December 2013 Release

We have become aware of an issue in the recently released December 2013 Update of Premiere Pro CC. If you are user who frequently imports from other projects, or via XMLs, we recommend that you do not install this update. We are working hard to fix this and hope to have a patch available within 7-10 days. We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC (7.2), December 2013

Creative Cloud is always evolving, and ongoing updates are one of the most popular benefits for users. In a fast-changing industry, Creative Cloud members always have the latest versions of the Adobe professional video tools as soon as they are available, including feature enhancements and optimized performance.

Today we’re thrilled to release the fourth version of Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

You can install the update through the Creative Cloud desktop application, or you can check for new updates from within any Adobe application by choosing Help > Updates. Ideally, you should install the updates automatically through the Creative Cloud desktop application or by choosing Help > Updates, but you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Windows or Mac OS. Note that if updates aren’t visible in the Creative Cloud app, quitting and relaunching may help.

This release brings multiple performance enhancements to Premiere Pro, and several new features. In addition, SpeedGrade, Prelude, Adobe Media Encoder and Adobe Anywhere are all releasing updates today as well, offering video pros an ever-improving integrated workflow. An update to After Effects is coming soon. For more on the December 2013 Creative Cloud pro video release visit the Creative Layer blog.

We hope you like what we’ve done. Below is a list of what’s new; more information is available here. And from all of the Premiere Pro team, we’d like to wish every one of our customers a wonderful festive period. See you next year!

  • Voice-over recording directly in the Timeline has been enhanced.
    • A pre-roll overlay in the Program Monitor counting down to the time when recording will start
    • The ability to pre-roll before the sequence start time
    • A new dedicated voice-over record button which can be added to the Audio Track header, and includes pre-roll functionality
    • A red record status indicator in the Program Monitor when recording is taking place, including a count-out to the end of a recording when an Out Point has been set
  • Multiple Media Browser panels can be open at once for browsing multiple projects or locations simultaneously
  • Clip selection overrides track targeting for multiple editing commands (such as Match Frame, Mark Clip, Lift/Extract, Add Edit, etc.)
  • Single camera multi-cam only shows single camera in the Source and Program Monitors
  • A sequence can be created by dragging media to an empty Timeline panel
  • The Ripple Delete command can be used with an In/Out range set in a sequence
  • Mercury Transmit can output a Dolby E stream for external hardware decoding
  • AVCi100 .mov files can be smart-rendered to MXF-wrapped AVCi100
  • OpenCL performance has been improved
  • The active source clip name is shown on multi-cam clips used in a sequence
  • With a sequence or sequences selected in the Project Panel, a new project can be created from just those sequences by using File > Export > Selection as Premiere Pro project
  • Markers can be exported from any asset or sequence to a document, as a .csv or .html file with thumbnails
  • Clip markers can be added to selected clips in the timeline without needing to load them into the Source Monitor
  • Multicam sequences can be created with a custom preset for switched audio
  • Playback performance with XAVC 60p 4K media using Matrox hardware has been improved
  • OP1a formats can be used for preview renders
  • Improved AVC-Ultra support
  • OMF export improvements, especially when working with adaptive audio tracks

Premiere Pro and Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks)

UPDATE: We are aware that a small number of users are encountering stability issues after upgrading to Mac OS X 10.9. We are currently investigating these cases.

Apple today released the latest version of their operating system, Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks). We’re happy to say that both Premiere Pro CC and Premiere Pro CS6 are supported with this OS, and we do not foresee any issues for users who wish to upgrade.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC (7.1), October 2013

As part of Creative Cloud, we are able to bring exciting new features to Adobe Premiere Pro far quicker and more regularly than ever before to help you stay a step ahead.  Less than 4 months after the CC releases shipped, Creative Cloud will be adding over 150 new features that greatly improve video workflows, with significant new updates to Adobe Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, SpeedGrade CC, Prelude CC, Adobe Media Encoder CC, Adobe Story and previewing a brand-new iPad app, Prelude Live Logger.  We’ll be demoing these new features at the IBC tradeshow this week, and they will be available to all Creative Cloud members soon.  Learn more about all the new Video releases here, and see an overview video of the new features in Premiere Pro here.

Our forthcoming October 2013 release of Premiere Pro CC brings a slew of new features to allow editors to work faster than ever, at higher fidelity, with previously unimagined access to rich color grading and processing tools.

Color is becoming increasingly important throughout an entire production workflow, and the addition of the Lumetri Deep Color Engine in the June 2013 Premiere Pro CC release gave editors the ability to work with beautiful SpeedGrade grades right inside the application. With this release, SpeedGrade has fully implemented the Mercury Playback Engine from Premiere Pro, and a brand new workflow between the two applications is being introduced, namely Direct Link. With Direct Link, editors can save a project in Premiere Pro and then open the sequence they were working on directly in SpeedGrade, with no need to deal with interchange formats or any kind of conversion. SpeedGrade then opens the sequence in a familiar timeline that more closely matches how you work in Premiere Pro. You can access all the clip edit points, transitions, and layers, using the same track layout as Premiere Pro. From there, create your grades, and then reopen the same project in Premiere Pro with all your color work fully intact. This workflow uses no interchange formats and no importing or exporting – it’s just the same Premiere Pro project moving between the two applications.  See a quick demo video here.

Responding to rapid changes in the industry with the move to Ultra High Definition 4K formats and beyond, Premiere Pro’s outstanding native media support has been given a major boost this release. New native file format support for Cinema DNG, Sony RAW, Phantom Cine, improved MJPG from Canon 1DC, Sony XAVC Long GOP, Panasonic AVC Ultra (Long GOP), 64 bit ProRes decoding (Mac OS X 10.8 or higher only), and support for exporting XAVC up to 4K and AVCi200 is included, and Cinema DNG can be debayered on a supported GPU for even better performance. For the highest resolution, RED Dragon 6K is also natively supported, with full RED color science built in. And if a high-powered system isn’t available, improved capabilities for relinking from proxy media back to full resolution, combined with brand new editable sequence settings, make this kind of work much easier.  See a quick demo video of the new format support video here.

A host of new editing features are included in this release designed to speed up the creative process. The new Monitor Overlays feature allows for critical information to be superimposed in both Source and Program Monitors. Designed to be flexible and customizable, editors can select which metadata is displayed and where, so important information such as clip timecode, edit point indicators and marker comments can be seen at a glance and in context. Other new editing features like single-click frame hold, rippling of sequence markers, faster maximum JKL speeds (up to 32x), leaner trim icons, drag-drop support for After Effects transitions from popular third-parties like GenArts, new slimmer trim cursors, all add up to this being an essential release for modern editors. See a quick demo video here.

Multicam workflows have been further enhanced, with easy control over the ordering of angles, and the ability to switch angles on and off, making working with large numbers of camera angles simple. Working with multicam source sequences is also improved, with Premiere Pro now displaying a composite view during the edit, so the multicam view matches the final output, and displays any applied scaling or effects.

We continue to strive to bring regular, feature-rich releases to Adobe Creative Cloud, and the October 2013 release is a great example of how passionate we are about bringing editors the features and workflows they need to work fast and as creatively as possible in the world of modern production.

Other new features in this October 2013 release of Premiere Pro CC include:

  • Back button added to Media Browser
  • Sequences have thumbnails that Hover Scrub in Icon view in the Project Panel
  • The Add Edit command overrides track targeting, favoring instead the selected clips under the playhead
  • The Edit To Tape dialog supports JKL shortcuts
  • Negative speeds can be set in the Clip Speed/Duration dialog for reverse playback
  • Audio channel layouts can be selected during QuickTime export
  • The Clip Name effect provides three naming options (Sequence Item Name, Project Item Name, File Name)
  • The Timecode effect automatically matches the Time Display parameter (or timebase) to the source clip
  • Transitions can be pasted to multiple edit points
  • All Effect parameters have individual reset buttons
  • Support for reading captions from MXF files (SMPTE 436M ancillary data track) as well as writing captions to the MXF OP1a format
  • Support for decoding and re-encoding CEA-708 captions.
  • Captions in QuickTime movies can be read regardless of the video codec
  • Caption files with a *.dfxp filename extension can be imported
  • Camera angles in Multicam source sequences can display camera angles as track names or clip names
  • New preference to allow the trim type of a previously selected point with the cursor
  • Improved, GPU accelerated Direct Manipulation
  • Multiple clips and sequences can be sent to Adobe Media Encoder at once

 

  • +1 more feature – decided by YOU

We asked. You answered.  Many of the JDI feature requests submitted are already IN the list above, now you have the chance to help us decide one more feature that will be coded at the IBC Show and included in the October 2013 release.  Vote via Twitter from Monday, Sept 9th at 6pm PST to Tuesday, Sept 10th at 6pm PST, including @AdobePremiere and #myJDI with the number/name of the feature YOU want in the next release:

    1. Render Multiple Sequences: Ability to highlight sequences in a bin, and choose to render them all – not encode, just render any effects on those timelines.
    2. Add Effect Preset: Double clicking an Effect Preset adds it to the selected clip instead of editing the preset. Making them the same behaviour as adding the base effect or plugin keeping workflow consistent.
    3. In/Out Ripple Delete: Ripple Delete works on in/out ranges not just selection
    4. Add Keyframe Shortcut: An Add Keyframe keyboard shortcut.
    5. Toggle All Target Shortcut: Ability to toggle target all tracks on and off at the same time.

Adobe Media Encoder CC October 2013 Release

The next version of Adobe Media Encoder CC is aimed at helping creatives and AME users deliver their projects faster and more easily, even with the growing number of projects that are processed each day.  With the new Adobe Media Encoder CC, we are introducing a range of features that will help you do just that. To view some video demoing our new features, visit our Adobe TV page.

Here is a little more detail on the top new features in development for the next versions of Adobe Media Encoder CC.

  • GPU Enabled Rendering –The Mercury Playback Engine inside of Adobe Media Encoder CC is now GPU enabled.  This allows you to speed up many of your everyday operations by taking full advantage of your hardware.  Tasks such as scaling, pixel format conversions and de-interlacing will all be faster to name a few.
  • Automated Image Processing – With the addition of GPU acceleration, Adobe Media Encoder CC helps you create customized output of media including watermarks and TimeCode overlays as well as image processing, such as Lumetri Look or LUTs.  You can pick from presets that ship with Adobe Media Encoder or pick from ones you have created yourself.
  • Sync Settings – Never again waste time customizing your software every time you use a different machine.  The Sync Settings features give you the ability to upload settings files from your local computer to Creative Cloud and then download your settings from Creative Cloud to any other computer from within Adobe Media Encoder CC.
  • Format Updates – A number of importers and exporters have been re-written to deliver fast output on new and popular formats such as AVCI and XAVC.
  • Native Adobe Premiere Pro CC projects – Adobe Media Encoder CC natively imports Adobe Premiere Pro CC projects to help speed up renders and give you some options.  For example, you can choose to render a whole stack of sequences from a Premiere Pro CC project file.

 

Keep checking our product blogs, product pages on Adobe and Adobe.com itself for the latest news and updates.  To learn more about these updates, visit our IBC 2013 page.

 

Adobe Prelude CC (2.1), October 2013

Just 4 months after the CC releases shipped, Creative Cloud is already adding over 150 new features that greatly improves the video products and workflows.  Today we are proud to reveal the new features that are coming to the next version of Adobe Prelude CC as well as our other professional video and audio applications Adobe Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, Audition CC, Adobe Media Encoder CC and SpeedGrade CC. To learn more about these updates, visit our IBC 2013 page.

The next version of Prelude CC is full of new features to empower and improve your postproduction workflows and to help you jump-start your production.  You will save time with an intuitive, keyboard-driven workflow, entering temporal markers and other searchable metadata while keeping your eyes on what matters most: your footage. With expanded file support for ingest and transcoding,  Adobe Prelude CC accelerates logging and clip editing with new features such as the ability to export clips and subclips, support for still images,  and the ability to export your markers list to name a few.  To view some video demoing our new features, visit our Adobe TV page.

Here is a little more detail on the top new features in development for the next versions of Prelude CC.

  • Prelude Live Logger – This is an iPad app that is in development and allows you to log live events and on set productions as they are happening with Prelude Live Logger.  Once logged on the iPad, you would be able to send the timecode synched markers in an XMP wrapper to Prelude CC desktop via the Creative Cloud. Import and combine single or multiple XMP files with your video assets using the Prelude CC Unassociated Metadata workflow.  See it in action.
  • Export clips, subclips and rough cuts — Send clips, sub-clips, and rough cuts directly from the Prelude CC project panel to Adobe Media Encoder CC for quick and efficient export of your logged assets.
  • Export Marker List – Export printable lists of markers for quick review and reporting on logged assets in your Prelude CC project.  Export in either CSV, easy for excel, or in HTML, an easy to read format with thumbnails.  Easily allow Producers to provide editors with a simple, easy-to-read shot list and comment marker sheet.
  • Expanded XMP Support – Capture and use the richest media possible, faster.  With added support of new formats such as GoPro, continue to ingest and log your preferred footage in its native file format, enabling greater control over the creative process.
  • Still Image Support – Import Still images into Prelude CC projects to organize, use in rough cuts, and for streamlined ingest into Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Keep checking our product blogs, product pages on Adobe and Adobe.com itself for the latest news and updates. This new version of Prelude CC will be available to Creative Cloud soon.

 

What is a JDI? ‘Just do it!’

Premiere Pro CC is built to be a rich, powerful video editing application that allows editors to meet the demands of modern post-production – quickly and intuitively, with minimal interruptions and maximum creativity. The Premiere Pro team focuses our priorities for each release by listening closely to problems and desires of editors. Of course, editors who cut with Premiere Pro are always excited when we release groundbreaking new features like the Mercury Playback Engine, Dynamic Link to After Effects, or the Lumetri Deep Color Engine; but it’s often the enhancements, the editorial polish that really make editors happy, make you say “Yes! This will make my workflow so much smoother!” It’s these refinements that we call JDI features – ‘Just do it’.

 

Between every engineering sprint (a several week period when the Premiere Pro team is developing features) we take short breaks to focus solely on JDIs. So how do we define a JDI? What elements make a feature request fall into the “this is gonna take a while” bucket or the “we should just do this” (JDI) bucket? The definition is very simple:

 

A JDI is a feature that can be fully implemented and fully tested in one day.

 

Some examples of recent JDIs would be –

 

• New keyboard shortcut or button for existing functionality – like the shortcut added in the July 2013 release to toggle between Source and Program monitors.

 

• Visual cues to ease the interpretation of your media – like through edit indicators added in the June 2013 release, or offline audio showing red that was added in the July 2013 release.

 

• Preferences to customize user experience – like the preference to not automatically jump to the beginning of the timeline or clip after playback has reached the end added in the July 2013 release.

 

The great thing about Creative Cloud is that now we can deliver JDIs faster and more frequently than ever before – we put time into engineering both the groundbreaking features as well as revisiting and continually refining the editing experience based on your feedback to help you work faster and more efficiently. So keep telling us what you think – we’re listening!

 

We asked. You answered.  Many of the JDI feature requests submitted are already IN the October 2013 release of Premiere Pro, now you have the chance to help us decide one more feature that will be coded at the IBC Show and included as well.  Vote via Twitter from Monday, Sept 9th at 6pm PST to Tuesday, Sept 10th at 6pm PST, including @AdobePremiere and #myJDI with the number/name of the feature YOU want in the next release:

  1. Render Multiple Sequences: Ability to highlight sequences in a bin, and choose to render them all – not encode, just render any effects on those timelines.
  2. Add Effect Preset: Double clicking an Effect Preset adds it to the selected clip instead of editing the preset. Making them the same behaviour as adding the base effect or plugin keeping workflow consistent.
  3. In/Out Ripple Delete: Ripple Delete works on in/out ranges not just selection
  4. Add Keyframe Shortcut: An Add Keyframe keyboard shortcut.
  5. Toggle All Target Shortcut: Ability to toggle target all tracks on and off at the same time.

 

If you have ideas for features you think are a little more involved than what would be considered a JDI you can always submit feature requests here.

Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.4 / 6.0.5) update

The Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.5) bug-fix update has been released, which addresses an issue with the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.4) update. This update is recommended for all users.

To install the update, choose Help > Updates in Premiere Pro CS6.

The update will show up in Adobe Application Manager (or Adobe Creative Cloud for members). Please restart the Application Manager or Creative Cloud application if you aren’t seeing the update.

You should install the update using the methods described above, but you can also download the updates directly for Mac OS or Windows.

A summary of the key issues resolved in the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.4) update is below.

  • Spanned AVCHD clips could sometimes play back incorrectly.
  • Smart rendering could sometimes cause segments to play back in the wrong order or incorrectly.
  • Smart rendering progress could sometimes stall and become unresponsive.
  • Premiere Pro could sometimes crash while the user was editing a growing QuickTime file.
  • When importing a Final Cut Pro XML file, audio clips could sometimes incorrectly import with a level of -∞.

The Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.5) update fixes a problem with the setting of In and Out points in the Source Monitor. Because updates are cumulative, installing the current Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.5) update gives you the fixes in the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.4) update, too.

A list of bugs fixed in the Premiere Pro July 2013 update

In addition to all the great features in this week’s release, many bugs were also fixed in the July 10th update. Here is a summary:

 

Import

  • H.264 444 video files are incorrectly decoded as 422. One manifestation is green artifacts.
  • Some XDCAM 422 QuickTime clips fail to import on Mac, and imports only audio on Windows.
  • hang on quit if project contains SonyRaw Format clips imported via Media Browser
  • Crash on dragging an empty bin from Media Browser to the Project panel, with error message “[..\..\Src\ProjectActions.cpp-2653]”

Growing File

  • Growing file sometimes becomes media offline while editing
  • Growing file sometimes goes offline while editing

Capture

  • When capture codec is set to DNxHD 145, clips captured at 1080i setting are created at 1080p.
  • If Capture panel and Edit to Tape panel are open at the same time, Capture panel will fail to capture video.
  • Capture Device in the capture window becomes Offline after closing the Edit to Tape panel
  • Crash on batch capture with tape deck connected via SDI. Error message: [..\..\Src\ManualRecorderUtilities.cpp-348]

Export

  • [FCP XML Export] No audio with clip if track is muted at export with XML
  • OMF Export does not trim audio properly if audio comes from multicamera sequences
  • FCP XML’s sometimes lose the correct output assignment and panning information on import.
  • Sequence previews are used during movie export regardless of the “Use Previews” Export Settings option being selected or not.
  • Some muxed h264 CBR exports are longer than the original source material
  • Duration of H264 encodes is shorter than the source by up to a second.

Smart Render: Media from some decks does not smart render properly

Control Surface

  • Faders on control surface do not work with an adaptive clip in a multichannel sequence.
  • Some control surface faders for Clip Mixer are not updated when switching between sequences for Clip Volume value of 0.0
  • Toggle Control Surface Clip Mixer Mode button assignment provides no visual feedback.
  • Mute Buttons do not update correctly for some control surface interfaces

Edit to Tape

  • Edit to Tape Panel: after edit is complete, edit data remains stored in deck, and deck often remains in Insert or Assemble mode. Causes tape export failure on some decks.
  • Edit to Tape panel: “Delay Movie Start by [x] frames” is not properly honored in some case
  • Audio tracks in Edit to Tape panel do not default  to A1 through A4 when switch from “Insert” to “assemble,” then back to Insert
  • Export to Tape panel: when switching from Assemble to Insert, all audio channels are selected, even when the channels are unsupported.

Transmit: Occasional crash on toggling Transmit during timeline playback [Mac only]

Playback

  • After external I/O device is disconnected, CTI sometimes fails to move
  • after stopping playback, AVC-Intra and DVCPro HD files take 15 – 20 seconds to render frames for playback
  • Some XDCAM QT MOV clips show Media Pending graphic for extended period and exhibit poor scrubbing and playback

Audio

  • Various issues interfacing with audio drivers on Mac that could result in failed audio recording or playback, issues connecting to audio devices, audio issues upon the computer waking.
  • Poor quality audio when using some USB microphones in conjunction with a capture card
  • Audio distortion with audio enabled on some capture cards
  • Adaptive clips exported to Audition lose audio when channels are remapped.
  • Channel mapping of 5.1 clips exported to Audition is sometimes incorrect
  • Only the first audio channel of SonyRaw plays clips play when loaded into the Source monitor from Media Browser
  • Crash with error message “[..\..\Src\Content\AudioSequenceContent.cpp-903]”

Timecode

  • Timecode for some DPX clips is not handled properly
  • Premiere does not read correct start timecode from .mp4 files from some cameras

Merged Clips: “Reveal in Project” does not work with Merged Clips

Relink

  • Media not relink-able after converting a project from CS6 to CS7: Error message “Cannot Link Media: The selected file cannot be linked because it has 2 audio channels and the clip was created with 1 audio channels”
  • “Log Note” in Clip Metadata is lost after relinking

Sequence Settings: New Sequence from Clip: Some stereo clips yield a sequence with audio set to 10 Channel Mono

Timeline/Editing

  • The Timeline panel does not redraw correctly after audio keyframes are deleted.
  • Relevant menu options are unavailable when an empty timeline has focus.
  • Record Voice Over does not work when an Out point is set in Timeline
  • New audio tracks initialize at minimum track height in cases where they should be expanded
  • Crash on undoing a razor edit with with multiple clips selected, with error message “../Src/Sequence/PersistentGroup.cpp-108” or “../Inc/Sequence/TrackItemGroup.h-215”

Multicam

  • Upon flattening a multicam sequence, transitions are applied on the wrong layers.  Can lead to crash with error message […Src\Sequence\Action\SequenceAddTransitionAction.cpp-57".]
  • “Extend Previous Edit”: command can result in incorrect media being used.
  • Duplicate frame indicators are shown in Multicam edits where clips from different cameras have overlapping timecode
  • When a given multicam sequence is already loaded in the Source monitor, the Match Frame command does not auto-select the correct camera
  • Multicam project lost all multicamera source synchronization after re-recording cuts then save/reopen project

Sync by Audio

  • When syncing by audio fails, user receives no notification
  • If a track in the Timeline contains multiple copies of a source clip, then Synchronize by Audio can sync to wrong clip
  • Syncing by audio can move audio track items that are on the same track in the Timeline but not selected
  • When one of the selected track items is a nested sequence, Syncing by audio always moves other A/V clip.

Effects and Transitions

  • Color at edges of crisp mattes is inverted (GPU acceleration only)
  • Effects Panel: the Accelerated Effects badges are not displayed (Windows only)
  • Error in the way dissolves are rendered with Composite in Linear Color is enabled
  • Three-Way Color Corrector does not handle Levels correctly in GPU playback mode
  • Clipping occurs with some color correction plugins at values greater that 1

Insert Sequence as Clips: If a sequence contains a layered PSD, App crashes upon inserting it into another sequence as clips [KEM roll]

Metadata: Crash during metadata refresh

Markers

  • On tabbing with an uncommitted edit in the Markers panel, the Text Edit Control sometimes loses focus
  • When playhead is on a clip marker, Clear Current Marker can instead delete a sequence marker

Closed Captions

  • Quicktime exports with embedded captions can have frame size problems when viewed in QT player 7 and Premiere
  • if the project contains captions, project file size grows with each save.

Creative Cloud: CC Authentication is not remembered in some cases.

 

Premiere Pro CC (7.0.1), July 2013

Today, the Adobe Premiere Pro CC (7.0.1) update was released.

You can check for new updates and install them by choosing Help > Updates.

If you’re checking for updates in the Creative Cloud desktop application, and the updates don’t appear, restarting the application can force it to check for recent updates. In general, updates will appear in the Creative Cloud desktop application within 24 hours of being made available.

If you are not able to install the updates automatically by choosing Help > Updates, you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Mac OS or Windows by choosing the “Adobe Premiere Pro CC Update” under the “7.0.1″ heading for your operating system.

For information about updates for other Adobe professional video applications, see this page.


One of the best things about Creative Cloud is that we’re able to develop and release features in cadence with the demands of this rapidly growing and evolving industry. The Premiere Pro CC July 2013 update, available now, is the first example of that, and we’re thrilled to be able to give you multiple new editing features so soon after the first CC release – less than a month after we shipped CC. These features are focused in the areas of timeline editing, viewing, navigation and media management, and are direct responses to customer feedback we’ve been closely listening to. The release also includes a number of bug fixes, including a documented critical bug with multicam workflows, and is recommended for all users.

The Premiere Pro team puts great importance on engaging with customers at every level. The new features added to this update are based on the incredible amount of feedback we get from our user base, and are designed around making those small things you do thousands of times a day easier and faster to achieve, keeping you creative, productive, and hopefully, happy. We hope you enjoy them, and we look forward to bringing our Creative Cloud members more great new releases in the future.

Adobe also announced today that Adobe Anywhere for video, which was initially previewed in April 2013 at the National Association of Broadcasters tradeshow (NAB), is now available and shipping. With Adobe Anywhere, the biggest headaches in video production — massive file transfers, duplicate media, and proxy files – are a thing of the past. Adobe Anywhere brings virtual teams of talent together, enabling them to efficiently log, edit, share and finish video productions using standard networks and hardware. Today’s release of Adobe Anywhere supports the latest versions of Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe Prelude CC. Support for Adobe After Effects CC is expected later in 2013.

See this page for a list of bugs fixed in this update.

The complete list of newly added features in this Premiere Pro CC update is below:

1. Anywhere for video support
2. Duplicating a title in a sequence creates a new, unique title, which can be independently edited from the original.
3. Lift and Extract can be used when only an In or Out point is set (if only an In is set, Lift/Extract will use the end of the sequence as the Out point; if only an Out is set, the beginning of the sequence will be used for the In point).
4. Copy, Cut, and Clear commands work between In and Out points on targeted tracks when no clips are selected.
5. When a sequence is loaded in the Source Monitor, keyboard shortcuts can be used to navigate to edit points (Up/Down keys by default).
6. Keyboard shortcuts can be used to clear In/Out points on clips in the Project Panel.
7. The Enable Clip command now works as a toggle when multiple clips are selected, such that any disabled clips become enabled and vice versa.
8. The Match Frame command will prioritize a selected clip over a targeted track.
9. The Relink command can now be used on a sequence containing offline media.
10. The Export EDL dialog now contains the option to include or exclude Transitions and the Key Track.
11. The Reveal In Project command now works from the Source Monitor.
12. A preference has been added to select whether or not playback jumps to the beginning of the Timeline or a Clip once the end has been reached.
13. A button has been added to the Timeline Panel to globally Link or Unlink all clips in the sequence.
14. An assignable keyboard shortcut has been added to enable toggling between the Source and Program Monitors.
15. The Reveal In Finder command can now be used on clips in a sequence..
16. A default start timecode value for all new sequences can be set in the Timeline panel.
17. Clips can now be dragged from the Finder or Explorer directly into the Source Monitor.
18. The Match Frame command now works on Nested or Multi-Camera Source Sequences, first matching to the source sequence, then stepping back further to the original master clip used in that source sequence.
19. Offline audio clips are now displayed in red, matching offline video clips.
20. The Source Settings dialog can be accessed by right-clicking on Clips within the Timeline Panel.
21. A preference has been added to allow the Timeline Panel to be automatically focused after an Insert or Overwrite edit is performed.
22. The Auto-Save dialog is suppressed during editing, and auto saves will not occur if no changes have been made to the project.
23. The Tone Settings dialog allows users to set the amplitude and frequency of the Bars and Tone synthetic clip.
24. Closed Captions are displayed on thumbnails in the Captions panel.
25. Options have been added to the Automate To Sequence dialog for Still Clip Duration, giving control over whether still clips use the In/Out range or a specified number of frames per clip (for timelapse workflows).

More information is available in the ‘What’s New’ document.

Our commitment to customers includes those who haven’t yet subscribed to Creative Cloud or who rely on CS6, and we plan to release an update to Premiere Pro CS6 in the coming weeks that will address an AVCHD clip spanning issue. For more information in video production and Adobe Creative Cloud, go here.

Premiere Pro CC is Available Now!

It is with enormous pleasure that we are able to say that the Adobe Premiere Pro CC is available NOW through Creative Cloud. We’re very excited about this release and have been looking forward to today for a long time! We hope you enjoy being creative with it. Exciting new versions of all our creative applications are also released today. A veritable plethora of links and goodies are below. Have fun!

 

OVERVIEW

WHAT’S NEW? – http://adobe.ly/15cYBFI

VIDEO – Creative Cloud for Video Pros: http://adobe.ly/ZLKZmH

VIDEO – Overview of Premiere Pro CC: http://adobe.ly/ZBQArW

BLOG POST WITH EXTENSIVE INFORMATION: http://adobe.ly/12kgPt6

DATA SHEET – What’s New In Premiere Pro CC: http://adobe.ly/16qm3jV

 

NEW FEATURES

-       Lumetri Deep Color Engine

-       Audio Enhancements

-       Editing Finesse

-       Link & Locate

-       Sync Settings

  • BLOG – Use Sync Settings for sharing keyboard shortcuts, preferences, effect presets, and workspaces: http://adobe.ly/129fQJq

-       Native-Format Workflows

-       Premiere Pro CC & Prelude CC

 

CREATIVE CLOUD

Video Overview of Creative Cloud: http://adobe.ly/Zhio8c

 

-       One of the advantages of Creative Cloud is the availability of updates as soon as they’re released.

  • This means that if you are already a Creative Cloud member, you already have Premiere Pro CC. Simply download when you want to start using these new features.
  • If you don’t have Creative Cloud yet, sign up today to get started. Find the membership that best meets your needs – single-app (starting at $10/mo), Complete (includes ALL the tools Adobe offers. Starting at $20/mo), or Teams (perfect for collaborative environments. Starting at $40/mo). Plan info is here: http://adobe.ly/1afpwXg

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

-       Getting Started in Premiere Pro CC: http://adobe.ly/1701wZb

-       10 Time-Saving Tips in Premiere Pro CC via premiumbeat.com: http://adobe.ly/11xODkb

-       A huge number of excellent how-to videos for new features in Premiere Pro CC: http://www.retooled.net/

 

QUESTIONS???

-       Premiere Pro FAQ: http://adobe.ly/nD6RKX

-       Find questions, answers & conversations on the Premiere Pro forum: http://adobe.ly/4LhNPW

-       Premiere Pro social channels offer tutorials, customer stories & much more. Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/premierepro and follow us on Twitter: @AdobePremiere (www.twitter.com/adobepremiere )

-       The Premiere Pro team is committed to continued improvement & innovation. Let us know how we can make it even better by submitting a bug report or feature request: http://bit.ly/feature_request

-       New to Premiere Pro? Creative Cloud gives you the opportunity to try tools you may not know yet. Here are some great resources for getting started: http://adobe.ly/psbYc4

-       Switching to Premiere Pro from FCP or Avid? http://adobe.ly/cx384G

 

 

 

Adobe Premiere Pro CC and GPU support

Apple’s ‘sneak peak’ of the new Mac Pro yesterday has got a lot of Premiere Pro users excited (and us too!), and has generated some questions around GPUs. Here I’m going to try to clarify the situation regarding GPU support in the forthcoming Premiere Pro CC (a lot of this information is in the previous blog post, but I’m reposting it in light of yesterday’s announcements).

When we first built the Mercury Playback Engine, we focused on NVIDIA CUDA technology. Since then, however, we have worked hard to ensure that users of both NVIDIA and AMD GPUs were able to harness the full power of the Mercury Engine, and I’m happy to confirm that Premiere Pro CC supports GPU acceleration on both AMD and NVIDIA hardware on both Mac and Windows.

The full list of supported GPUs in Premiere Pro CC is here.

For more information on exactly how the Mercury Playback Engine utilizes the computational power of the GPU, go here.

Also, some customers may be aware that in the past there was a not-so-secret way of enabling non-supported GPUs by the ‘hacking’ or removal of a text file. This is no longer necessary in Premiere Pro CC. As long as you have a reasonably modern card with at least 1GB of VRAM, you will still be able to enable that card in the Project Settings dialog. A warning message will appear letting you know that your card has not been certified by Adobe, but once that dialog is clicked through you can use your GPU. The team does try to certify as many GPUs as possible, but we can’t test everything, so this is a way to let you decide if you’re happy using an untested configuration.

Finally, please note that Premiere Pro CC has support for multiple GPU configurations on export (only one is used during playback) so having more than one GPU will speed up your output times. This means that – you guessed it – Premiere Pro will utilize the dual-GPUs in the new Mac Pro when exporting to an output file. Indeed, our very own David McGavran will be talking about our OpenCL improvements at WWDC on Thursday.

Improved GPU support in Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Premiere Pro CC offers a significantly improved Mercury Playback Engine, giving more editors than ever before the ability to enjoy the best possible performance. As a recap, the Mercury Playback Engine is three things combined: a 64-bit architecture, massively multi-threaded CPU optimization, and GPU optimization, all of which combine to allow dense, effects-rich, multi-format sequences to play back smoothly. It has always been (and remains) perfectly feasible to run Mercury without the addition of a GPU (‘software rendering mode’) and for many kinds of projects this provides ample horsepower, but adding a GPU makes a noticeable difference, particularly as sequences become more complex.

 

Premiere Pro CC introduces support for both CUDA and OpenCL GPU architectures on both the Mac and Windows platforms, which results in a dramatically enhanced list of certified GPUs, the full list of which follows this post. (Please note that the list currently displayed on this page is out of date, and will be corrected soon.) Also, if you own a GPU that we haven’t officially tested, but which meets the minimum requirement of having 1GB of VRAM and appropriate drivers installed, you will be able to enable that GPU in Playback Settings. An alert warns you that your configuration isn’t officially certified, but you’ll still be able to turn it on to use it. All this means that more people than ever will be able to enjoy full, GPU-enhanced Mercury Playback Engine performance.

 

Finally, for customers using configurations containing multiple GPUs, Premiere Pro CC can use all of them during export (but not during playback) so customers who require the fastest possible encode times will be able to leverage all the GPUs they own.

 

The full list of officially certified GPUs for Premiere Pro CC is as follows:

 

Windows:

 

NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285 (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 470 (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 570 (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 675MX (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680MX (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 690 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro CX (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro FX 3700M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro FX 3800 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro FX 3800M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro FX 4800 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro FX 5800 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 2000 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 2000D (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 2000M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 3000M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 4000 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 4000M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 5000 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 5000M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 5010M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 6000 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro K2000 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro K2000M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro K3000M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro K4000 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro K4000M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro K5000 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro K5000M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Tesla C2050 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Tesla C2070 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Tesla C2075 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Tesla M2050 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Tesla M2070 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Tesla K10 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Tesla K20 (CUDA)

ATI Radeon HD 6650M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 6730M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 6750 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 6750M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 6770 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 6770M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 6950 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 6970 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7510M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7530M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7550M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7570 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7570M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7590M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7610M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7630M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7650M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7670 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7670M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7690M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7730M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7750 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7750M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7770 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7770M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7850 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7850M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7870 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7870M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7870 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7970M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7950 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7970 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 7970 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8470 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8550M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8570 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8570M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8670 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8670M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8690M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8730M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8740 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8750M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8760 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8770M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8790M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8870 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8950 (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 8970 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro M2000 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro V3900 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro M4000 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro V4900 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro W5000 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro V5900 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro M5950 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro M6000 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro S7000 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro W7000 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro V7900 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro W8000 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro S9000 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro W9000 (OpenCL)

ATI FirePro S10000 (OpenCL)

 

 

Mac:

 

ATI Radeon HD 6750M (OpenCL)

ATI Radeon HD 6770M (OpenCL)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285 (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 675MX (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680MX (CUDA)

NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro CX (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro FX 4800 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro 4000 (CUDA)

NVIDIA Quadro K5000 (CUDA)

Sync Settings features in Premiere Pro CC for sharing keyboard shortcuts, preferences, effect presets, and workspaces

The Sync Settings features give you the ability to upload settings files from your local computer to Creative Cloud and then download your settings from Creative Cloud to any other computer from within Premiere Pro. The Sync Settings features work very much the same in Premiere Pro as the same features in After Effects.

The settings that can be synchronized in this way correspond to the entries in the Sync Settings category in the Preferences dialog box:

  • Preferences/Settings
  • Workspace Layouts
  • Keyboard Shortcuts

Do let us know with a feature request if there are other settings that you’d like to see synchronized.

When you start Premiere Pro, the Welcome Screen gives you your first opportunity to synchronize settings. You have two options under the Sync Settings To Adobe Creative Cloud heading:

  • Sync Now: Click this to begin the synchronization process for the user with the Adobe ID shown.
  • Use Settings From A Different Account: Click this to begin the process of switching to a different account and using its settings.

You have access to the same commands from the File menu, from the menu entry that will either be Sync Settings or your Adobe ID, depending on whether you’ve enabled the feature by choosing to synchronize settings.

Also in that Sync Settings menu are a few other commands:

  • Clear Settings: Restores all settings to the system state (i.e., the settings that were in place before you used the Sync Settings feature); also clears the user information from the application (if you chose the Use Settings From Different Account Feature). You can also choose to enable the Automatically Clear User Profiles On Quit preference in the Sync Settings category. This is a good idea if you are working temporarily on a shared computer.
  • Manage Sync Settings: Opens the Sync Settings pane of the Preferences dialog box.
  • Manage Creative Cloud Account: Takes you to the Creative Cloud web page.

The Sync Settings menu can also be opened by clicking the button in the lower-left corner of the application window. The tooltip for this button is the most convenient way of seeing which account’s settings are in use.

Any time that you switch users or load settings from Creative Cloud, you must close the current project. When you upload files from the local computer to Creative Cloud, closing the project is not necessary.

When you choose to synchronize settings, you will either get a message telling you that “Settings are already in sync” or a Sync Settings dialog box. In the Sync Settings dialog box, you can choose whether to upload/save your current files from the computer to the Creative Cloud server (Upload Settings) or download and apply the files from the Creative Cloud server (Download Settings). If you know that you will always want to do one or the other, you can check the Remember My Preference box. A good example for using this setting is when you want to treat your primary office computer as the gold standard, so you only ever upload its settings to Creative Cloud, whereas the computers that you freelance at are only consuming those settings, so you only ever download to them. You can change your mind about this setting and choose a new value from the When Syncing menu in the Sync Settings category in the Preferences dialog box.

a quick walkthrough of editing a multi-camera sequence with clips synchronized by audio

One of the great features in Premiere Pro CC (7.0) is the ability to align clips in a multi-camera (multicam) sequence according to their audio waveforms. This makes synchronizing clips from various sources extremely easy, and it tends to be more accurate than the previous methods involving manual setting of In points, et cetera.

This post is not intended as a detailed exploration of all of the multicam improvements in Premiere Pro CC (and there are many), but as a quick end-to-end guide to show how easy it is to edit a multicam sequence.

Step 1. Start Premiere Pro and create a new project.

Start Premiere Pro. When the Welcome screen appears, click New Project.

In the New Project dialog box, enter a name for the project, and click OK to accept the defaults.

New Project

Step 2. Import footage.

Choose File > Import. In the Import dialog box that appears, navigate to the directory containing your video and audio files. Select the ones that you want to import, and click Open. You can select a range of files all at once in the Import dialog box by clicking the first one and Shift-clicking the last one, selecting everything in between.

Import

The footage items will appear in the Project panel, as shown here. Note that I have three video files with audio, plus one audio file from an external recorder. The audio-only file is my good audio track, whereas the audio from the video files will be used as reference audio for synchronization.

Project

Step 3. Make a multicam source sequence.

With all of the footage items selected in the Project panel, choose Clip > Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence. (You can also access this command by right-clicking on the selected items in the Project panel.) This makes the Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence dialog box appear.

Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence

Choose to synchronize according to audio by choosing Audio in the top part of this dialog box. Leave other settings at their defaults and click OK.

This creates a new multi-camera source sequence in the Project panel, and it moves the clips into a Processed Clips folder.

Multi-Camera Source Sequence

Premiere Pro knows to mute the audio for the video clips, since their audio is just used as reference. You can see this or change it by opening the multi-camera source sequence in the Timeline panel.

To see the multi-camera source sequence in the Timeline panel (which you don’t really need to do right now, but maybe you’re curious), right-click it in the Project panel and choose Open In Timeline from the menu that appears. Here you can see that the clips have been arranged in time so that their audio waveforms are aligned.

Multi-Camera Source Sequence

You’ll use the multi-camera source sequence much like any other clip.

Step 4. Make a multi-camera target sequence.

With the multi-camera source sequence selected in the Project panel, choose File > New > Sequence From Clip (or right-click on the multi-camera source sequence and choose New Sequence From Clip from the context menu).

This creates a new multi-camera target sequence, and opens it in the Program Monitor and Timeline panel.

Multi-Camera target sequence

Step 5. Enable multi-camera editing in the Program Monitor.

Click the Settings button (the button shaped like a wrench in the lower-right portion of the Program Monitor), and choose Multi-Camera from the menu that appears. This converts the Program Monitor to multi-camera mode.

Program Monitor

Step 6. Enable recording of multicamera edits.

Press 0 on the main keyboard to enable recording of multicamera edits.

Step 7. Begin editing.

In the Program Monitor or Timeline panel, press the spacebar or otherwise begin playback. While the sequence is playing, press the number key on the main keyboard to cut to the camera with that number. The active camera’s clip has a red border around it in the multi-camera view in the Program Monitor.

editing

You can go back and play through the sequence as many times as you like, making and refining edits. When you stop playback, you’ll see the cuts reflected in the Timeline panel.

Step 8. Export.

With the sequence active in the Program Monitor or Timeline panel, choose File > Export > Media.

exporting

Just choose your export settings and click Export (or Queue to send the export job to Adobe Media Encoder).

It’s that easy.

Premiere Pro CC (7.0)

Today is a very exciting today for us here at Adobe, as we are revealing the next and greatest version of Premiere Pro, alongside brand new versions of our other professional video and audio applications. You can check out demos of the top features for all these next versions on our NAB Reveal page:

While these versions are not yet available, if you’re a Creative Cloud member, you’ll automatically be able to get these new versions as soon as they’re available as part of your membership. And if you’re not a member yet, now is a fantastic time to sign up, because we’re offering a special 40% discount until the 19th of April.

Designed to work the way editors think, the next version of Adobe Premiere Pro offers a slew of new features and refinements that let you move through your projects efficiently and intuitively, including Editing Finesse workflow enhancements, Link & Locate to help you find files faster, an expanded audio toolset, an even more responsive Mercury Playback Engine, and a powerful new closed captioning workflow.  We’ve also added the Lumetri Deep Color Engine to Premiere Pro, so you can apply .look files from Adobe SpeedGrade to your clips and cut with the aesthetic of the grade. A library of preset Lumetri looks is included, offering simple, beautiful looks without leaving the application.

There are so many new features in the next version of Premiere Pro it will take some time to go through them all, but in the meantime here’s a pretty comprehensive list:

Top new features in the next version of Premiere Pro

  • Editing finesse: multiple refined tools and workflows to help you work faster than ever
  • Redesigned Timeline: a cleaner look and feel for intuitive workflows
  • Customizable track headers with the option to save track header presets. Scrolling the mouse wheel or keyboard shortcuts can be used expand tracks.
  • Duplicate frame markers: see which frames have already been used
  • Paste attributes: paste the attributes of customized effects
  • Link & Locate: Allows for much faster and simpler clip relinking and media management
  • Lumetri Deep Color Engine: Apply rich color presets to clips from the new Lumetri Looks browser, or apply LUTs or .look files from Adobe SpeedGrade to clips
  • New Audio Clip Mixer for adjusting levels on individual clips
  • Audio control surface support
  • New audio Plug-ins including the TC Electronic Loudness meter
  • Support for VST3 and Audio Unit plugins (Mac OS only)
  • Adobe Anywhere for video integration. Just launched, Adobe Anywhere is a modern, collaborative workflow platform that empowers users of Adobe video tools to work together, using centralized media, across any network. Learn more here.
  • Industry-standard mezzanine codecs DNxHD (in MXF), and ProRes are built-in (ProRes encode requires Mac OS X 10.8.x)
  • Natively edit more formats including Sony XAVC and Panasonic AVC-Intra 200
  • Import, edit, repurpose, and export Closed Captions
  • OpenCL and CUDA support on Mac and Windows, and far more supported GPUs than ever before (plus the ability to enable an unsupported GPU)
  • AAF and XML import improvements to allow you to move projects and sequences from Avid and Final Cut Pro 7 (or earlier) systems

(Nearly) all new and changed features in the next version of Premiere Pro

Here is a virtually comprehensive list of changes, with detail beyond the summaries of the top items listed above. We’ll be posting a lot more detail over the coming weeks, and the outline below will be populated with links to in-depth articles and tutorials, so bookmark this page and check back.

User interface

▪ Adobe Story panel

▪ Adobe Exchange panel

▪ More icons and interface items created for HiDPI displays

▪ New audio effects plug-ins interface for clip and track effects

▪ Work Area Bar display set to off by default

▪ Action-safe & title-safe indicator in monitors for HD frame sizes

▪ Add or delete a track using context menu commands

▪ Command to enable or disable video preview through Mercury Transmit

▪ Double-click to expand or collapse tracks

▪ Timeline Track Height presets

 

Importing and sequence setup

▪ Improved AAF importer

▪ Support for Sony XAVC formats

▪ Display project bin structure in Media Browser for importing elements of a project editing

▪ Improved multicam editing

▪ Timesaving editing features

▪ Adobe Anywhere for video support

▪ Copy command enhanced to operate on a range in a sequence

▪ Create Multi-Camera Source Sequence from a bin or selection of clips

▪ Customizable number of Undo levels

▪ Dialog box for naming nested sequence when it is created

▪ Insert and Overwrite sequences as nests or individual clips

▪ Keyboard shortcuts for moving selected clips up or down to different tracks

▪ Multicam mode

▪ Navigate to and select next clip and previous clip

▪ Out-of-sync indicators for unlinked audio and video

▪ Preference to snap playhead when dragging it in the Timeline panel

▪ Subclips have the ability to access media beyond original limits

▪ Better, easier source patching/track targeting

▪ Through-edit indicators and Join Through Edits command

▪ Trimming to zero duration

▪ Option to show or hide clip markers effects and color

▪ Arrow keys for moving clip (modifying Position property)

▪ Automatically import an exported frame or movie into the project

 

Effects

▪Clip Name effect

▪ GPU-accelerated Wipe and Slide transitions

▪ Lumetri look presets and .look and LUT import

▪ Paste Attributes option dialog box

▪ Render Selection command to render selected clips

▪ Symmetrically trimming transitions

• Crop effect now has Edge Feather function

 

Performance

▪ Multiple GPU export support

▪ OpenCL processing on Windows

 

Audio

▪ Rectified audio waveforms

▪ Switch Source Monitor to Audio Waveforms by clicking Audio edit button

▪ Ability to switch waveforms in Source Monitor by clicking a button

▪ New audio effects plug-in window

▪ Audio Meter, Track Volume and Pan controls available in Timeline Track Headers

▪ Audio output mapping preferences for Mercury Transmit

▪ Audio waveform visible for nested sequence

▪ Ability to switch waveforms in Source Monitor by clicking  button

▪ Audio Clip Mixer

▪ Keyboard commands for increasing and decreasing clip volume

▪ Context menu command for showing audio time units

▪ Keyboard shortcuts to change pan values

▪ Modify—Audio Channels available for nested sequences

▪ Open an audio plug-in effect window from clips in a sequence

▪ Toggle Audio During Scrubbing

 

Exporting and Adobe Media Encoder

▪ Edit to Tape panel available for easier tape layback

▪ 16 bit DPX support

▪ Improvements to Smart Rendering

▪ QuickTime audio export with individual tracks

 

Miscellaneous

▪ Project and media management⁃ Importing individual clips, sequences, and other items from project files

▪ Import, repurpose, and export Closed Captions

▪ Audio Control surface support

▪ Custom location for Auto-save folder

▪ HiDPI user interface upgrades

▪ New Sequence dialog box suppressed when opening a new project

▪ Preference for loading most recent project when application starts, skipping Welcome Screen

▪ Preference to toggle tool tips on or off

▪ Search box in Marker panel

If you’re lucky/brave enough to be heading to Las Vegas next week for the NAB show, you’ll be able to see these new versions yourself. We hope you like what you see – we pride ourselves on listening to and engaging with the editing community, and this version brings many of the most requested features to the next version of Premiere Pro. If you want to ask questions about these new and changed features, come on over to the Premiere Pro user-to-user forum.

What’s new in Adobe Media Encoder CC (7.0)

Today we are revealing new features that are coming the next version of Adobe Media Encoder as well as our other professional video and audio applications, Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects, Audition, Prelude, and SpeedGrade. To see sneak peeks of all the Adobe professional video and audio products, click here.

The next version of Adobe Media Encoder is full of new features that allow it to continue to be the backbone of many postproduction workflows. Whether you use Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Prelude or Adobe After Effects to name a few, you can be sure that Adobe Media Encoder is running in the background to help.

You can see the features in action on the NAB Reveal webpage, and if you are in Las Vegas at NAB, come on over to the Adobe booth to see some demos and to talk with us.

When can you get your hands on these upcoming features? Although the next versions of Adobe Pro Video apps aren’t available now, we’re offering a NAB Show special to get 40% off your first year of Adobe Creative Cloud membership (only $29.99/month), and you’ll automatically get these new features as soon as they are available. You can check out upcoming top features coming to the next versions here. Creative Cloud is available for individuals or teams. www.creativecloud.com

Here is a look at some of the top new features coming to the next version of Adobe Media Encoder.

  •  (Enhanced) Output to virtually any screen, device, or format – Quickly and easily output your work for virtually any video or device format including DNxHD and ProRes.  Customize, set and organize your favorite presets in the Preset Browser for fast export and batch encoding in the background.
  •  Match Source Settings for H.264 and MPEG-2 exporters – Save time and automatically have your output sync with your input through Match Source Settings.  It is easier than ever to be able to chance format + bandwidth while ensuring the integrity of frames per second.
  • Export Closed Caption data – Export closed caption tracks seamlessly with Adobe Media Encoder from Adobe Premiere Pro sequences. Adobe Media Encoder exports closed caption tracks from Premiere Pro sequences as a separate “sidecar” file that contains the caption data. For QuickTime exports, you can choose to export the data either as a separate sidecar file, or embed the data within the output file.
  • Enhanced integration with Adobe After Effects – Export Adobe After Effects compositions directly into Adobe Media Encoder saving time and ensuring a smoother workflow. Several export formats previously available in After Effects are now available within Adobe Media Encoder.
  • (Enhanced) Support for Avid DNxHD Assets – Adobe Media Encoder easily supports the import and export of Avid DNxHD assets with no need to install additional codecs.
  • New MPEG-2 exporters – Performance enhancements and a UI redesign were done to MPEG-2, MPEG-2 Blu-ray and MPEG-2-DVD export formats.
    • Quality slider now has a range of 1-100 instead of the previous 1-5
    • New layout matches H.264 and other newer exporters
    • Enhancements to SurCode for Dolby Digital audio codec – This audio codec is now available for MPEG-2, MPEG Blu-ray, MPEG-2 DVD, H.264 an d H.264 Blu-ray exporters.

My colleague, Todd Kopriva, has written a more technical piece on Adobe Media Encoder centered on Adobe After Effects here. This piece is great at showing Adobe Media Encoder’s value to the other professional video products.

There is a look at the top new features coming to the next version of Adobe Media Encoder. Please continue to follow the Premiere Pro blog, Adobe Media Encoder site, and user forums for updates on Adobe Media Encoder in the coming weeks.

To discuss these new changes and features, please visit the Adobe Media Encoder user-to-user forum.

What’s new in Adobe Prelude CC (2.0)

Jump-start your production with Adobe Prelude, a unified interface for easy ingest, logging and transcoding that allow you to work faster, stay organized, and prepare your digital footage for a streamlined post-production process.

Today we are revealing Adobe Prelude CC (2.0), as well as our other professional video and audio applications – Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects, SpeedGrade, Adobe Media Encoder and Audition.  To see all the top new features in the future versions of these apps, click here.

The next version of Prelude is full of new features to empower and improve your postproduction workflows.  You’ll save time with an intuitive, keyboard-driven workflow, entering temporal markers and other searchable metadata while keeping your eyes on what matters most: your footage. With expanded file support for ingest and transcoding, Adobe Prelude accelerates shot-logging with new features like hover scrubbing thumbnails in the Project panel, file renaming during ingest, and metadata templates which ensure that key information is always added. Export rough cuts directly through Adobe Media Encoder to share your vision on virtually any device. And you can collaborate in new ways with your team with new Prelude integration for Adobe Anywhere for video and Adobe Story.

Although the next version of Prelude and the other professional video and audio apps aren’t available now, we’re offering a NAB Show special to get 40% off your first year of Adobe Creative Cloud membership (only $29.99/month), and you’ll automatically get these new features as soon as they are available.

Here’s a little more detail on the top features coming to the next version of Prelude:

  • Hover scrub thumbnails – Quickly review clips in the Project panel by hover-scrubbing thumbnails—no need to open the clip to see what is there. Click the clip, make it active and play it (including audio) using standard keyboard controls.
  • Rename files on ingest -Apply descriptive names to your files as you ingest so that you can more easily search for and find what you need later.
  • Define what information you need on ingested clips – Make sure media is tagged with the appropriate level of detail by creating customize templates that let you mandate what information is collected and applied to clips upon ingest.
  • Turn scripts into metadata with Adobe Story – Import a file from Story into Prelude, and turn your script into meaningful, searchable metadata that flows into Adobe Premiere Pro, speeding the editing of projects that rely on finding just the right word.  For more on this check out Wes Plate’s video located on the NAB Reveal page.
  • Support for growing files – The next version of Prelude helps you ingest and log growing files. This means post-production and editing work can begin even as production continues. This is great for projects requiring a fast turnaround, such as live-to-broadcast shows. As footage is being recorded by a system such as Omneon Media grid or Sienna PictureReady, Prelude continues to check in to see which files have grown. Prelude then refreshes that material so you can continue to work on your footage.  Additional hardware is required based on volume of growing footage.
  • Enable team collaboration with Adobe Anywhere – Prelude will have first class integration with Adobe Anywhere for video enabling for ingest and logging of files to remote servers.  Adobe Anywhere for video is available as a separate purchase and implementation.  Visit the Adobe Anywhere page to learn more.
  • Ingest files directly into selected bins – This new feature saves time in organizing footage because the user can direct where the ingested material will appear.  You can now ingest into a project specific bin instead of just the root bin.
  • Sony XMPilot Metadata support – you will be able to import the metadata found on a Sony XDCAM HD camera with XMPilot option into Prelude.  Prelude takes the static metadata found with the footage and adds it to the metadata panel.  Essence markers, markers that mark footage with interesting moments, show up as a comment marker in Prelude.  This adds value to your media and allows for easy search ability.
  • 64-bit on Windows and Mac – the next version of Prelude will be now natively, 64-bit on both Windows and Mac giving rock solid performance and stability.  Please note Prelude will only be available as 64-bit in future versions.
  • Create and Export Rough Cuts – the next version of Prelude offers you the option to export Rough Cuts directly through Adobe Media Encoder to share with others for review or for uploading to video sharing websites.

You can check out upcoming top features coming to all the next versions of Adobe professional video and audio apps here. , and read a preview of Prelude here.  If you are in Las Vegas at NAB, come on over to the Adobe booth to see some demos too!   Please continue to follow the Premiere Pro blog, Prelude website and user forums for updates on Prelude in the coming weeks. To learn more and discuss these new changes and features, please visit the Prelude user-to-user forum.

The making of “Waiting for Lightning”: recording and notes from seminar with Jacob Rosenberg

Recently, Jacob Rosenberg presented a seminar describing the making of the latest Bandito Brothers offering, “Waiting for Lightning.” Included in the seminar were Creative Suite tips and tricks, as well as a Q&A session with Jacob.

Click here to view the recording of the seminar.

If you are interested in the applications mentioned in this webcast, see this link: Creative Cloud Membership subscription.

Jacob covered a lot of ground in this webinar and in the Q&A segment at the close. Here are links to relevant information about the topics Jacob covered in his presentation, along with questions asked and answered in the Q&A segment:

main topics covered in presentation

miscellaneous and Q&A

“Video Professionals: Switching to the Adobe Creative Cloud and CS6″ with Jason Levine, session recording and notes

Jason Levine presented a webinar on how to get started with Creative Cloud and Adobe CS6 video tools to craft and promote your video productions. Jason provides tips for people switching from Final Cut Pro and Avid Media Composer. Here are the topics that Jason covered in his presentation, as well as links to relevant information:

Watch a recording of the webinar here. If you are interested in the applications mentioned in this webcast, see this link: Creative Cloud Membership subscription 

Main topics covered in the presentation and demo

What is Adobe Creative Cloud, and how do I get started?

Services: Adobe Story
Adobe Prelude (ingest, logging, rough cuts, export)
Adobe Premiere Pro
Adobe After Effects
Adobe Audition
Wrap-up

New NVIDIA Drivers for Mac

NVIDIA recently release an updated driver (version 304.00.05f02, available here) for Mac users with Quadro or GeForce cards running Mac OS X 10.8.2 . If you have experienced crashes in Premiere Pro CS6 or later when using a qualified NVIDIA GPU, we strongly recommend you update to this new driver version, which should improve stability. The crashes were mostly seen when switching from OpenCL to CUDA or when tabbing from other applications back to Premiere Pro (most notably Safari).

new updates for Adobe Media Encoder, Premiere Pro, and Prelude CS6 on Windows

Today, we released new updates for several of our CS6 applications on Windows, including Adobe Media Encoder, Premiere Pro, and Prelude.

These updates are cumulative Windows-only updates that contain an important change to the code signing to address the issue described on the following pages:

We strongly recommend that you install these updates.

You can install the updates automatically by choosing Help > Updates, or you can follow the links below for manual download and installation:

Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.2/6.0.3) update: HiDPI for Retina Display, bug fixes, and new supported GPUs

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates by choosing Help > Updates. The best way to check for updates is by closing all Adobe applications other than Adobe Bridge, and choosing Help > Updates in Adobe Bridge; this ensures that all processes related to Adobe video applications have been quit and can be updated safely.

Ideally, you should install the updates automatically by choosing Help > Updates, but you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Windows (6.0.3) or Mac OS (6.0.2).

Note that the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.3) update is only available for Windows. It contains all of the changes in the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.2) update, plus one more change to address an issue described here.

For information about updates for other Adobe professional video applications, see this page.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Premiere Pro forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.

We have also been working with several providers of plug-ins, codecs, and hardware devices to assist them in updating their software to fix some errors and crashes. Please take this opportunity to download and install updated codecs, plug-ins, and drivers from these providers, as relevant to your work. For more information about plug-ins and third-party hardware for Premiere Pro CS6, see this page.

We strongly recommend that users of Premiere Pro on Mac OS update to Mac OSX v10.8 for performance and stability improvements in that operating system update.

Updates are cumulative, so installing the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.2/6.0.3) update will also provide the fixes and features in the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.1) update.


features added or changed in this update

  • Windows 8 certification
  • updates for HiDPI display, which improves appearance on computers that use Retina Display, such as MacBook Pro computers
  • added GPUs to the list of those that Premiere Pro CS6 will use for GPU processing: GT 650M with 1GB of VRAM and GTX 680

    Note: Premiere Pro can use either OpenCL or CUDA for GPU processing on the GT 650M. The default is to use OpenCL. You can change this in the General project settings.

    For details of GPU acceleration in Premiere Pro, see this page. For details of OpenCL features in Premiere Pro CS6, see this page.


notable bugs fixed in this update

  • tearing in image when using XDCAM EX footage
  • numeric keypad keys couldn’t be assigned to keyboard shortcuts
  • audio deleted when enabling Audio Follows Video without enabling multicam for audio track
  • color shift introduced by Three-Way Color Corrector at default settings when GPU acceleration turned off
  • color shifts in some imported M2TS assets
  • Premiere Pro ignored Command+Option+H command to hide applications on Mac OSX
  • Auto-save window appearing over other applications when Premiere Pro was in the background
  • crash during auto-save if a third-party effect’s modal dialog box was open on Mac OSX (affects CoreMelt, etc.)
  • rendering preview files using OpenCL caused dropped frames in some cases
  • rendered preview files not used when restarting Premiere Pro in some cases, including when using certain third-party effects
  • when using CUDA on Mac OSX to export a sequence consisting of a very large number of still images (e.g., timelapse), GPU memory could become depleted and output frames corrupted
  • audio recorded through Audio Mixer (e.g., voice-over recording) appearing incorrectly as duplicated audio
  • channel output mapping for adaptive tracks was reset to default settings for duplicated sequences
  • audio waveform displayed incorrectly for clips with speed adjustments
  • audio playback for multichannel files too quiet in some circumstances
  • markers added during peak file generation not saved if Premiere Pro quit before peak file generation completed
  • fixes for QuickTime groiwng files
  • some 4:2:2 footage appeared jagged or pixelated in Program Monitor or Source Monitor when no effects applied
  • some MXF files going offline, requiring relinking
  • relinking to AVCHD media on Mountain Lion (Mac OSX v10.8) not possible for projects created on other operating systems
  • automatic relinking of footage occurring incorrectly in some cases
  • frames imported out of order for some MPEG assets
  • changes to timeline clip channel mapping performed using the context menu for the clip in the Timeline panel Audio were not saved with the project
  • Audition opened when choosing Reveal Project In Explorer from context menu for a clip in Premiere Pro Project panel
  • multicam source sequences in Source Monitor lost A/V synch when an In point was created
  • setting an In point in the Source Monitor created an In point for all clips in the Media Browser directory
  • thumbnails not appearing for some XDCAM HD items in Project panel and Timeline panel
  • deleting a nested sequence not providing a warning
  • layers not correctly counted in PSD file (Photoshop document) if layers contained in groups
  • importing a QuickTime file created by the FORK media system also imported the disabled proxy track
  • QT32Server failing in some circumstances, disabling ability to use some QuickTime features
  • some exported AVC-I files didn’t include appropriate drop-frame timecode information, so appeared with non-drop-frame timecode
  • closed captioning metadata was being set incorrectly
  • many other fixes in Mercury Transmit and in plug-in SDK, fixing issues with AJA, BlackMagic, Matrox, and other third-party I/O systems for video monitoring, tape capture, and exporting to tape
  • various fixes to FCP XML import and export
  • crash when removing some effects using Remove Effects command
  • crash during OMF export in some circumstances
  • crash on Mac OSX when computer wakes from sleep
  • various fixes for other crashes
  • various performance and stability improvements for CUDA and OpenCL processing

known issues with CUDA 5.0.17 and 5.0.24 driver (including crashes and kernel panics)

We have recently learned of some issues with the new CUDA drivers from Nvidia that cause crashes and kernel panics in some circumstances, including when switching between applications that use the GPU—e.g., when switching from Premiere Pro, to Safari, and then back to Premiere Pro.

Nvidia has summarized these issues and workarounds on their website. (Click the “Additional Information” tab and read the known issues.)

Here is the relevant part from that page on the Nvidia website:

  • There is a known issue in this release where forcing or allowing the system to go to sleep while running CUDA applications on 2012 MacBook Pro models with automatic graphics switching will cause a system crash (kernel panic). You can prevent the computer from automatically going to sleep by setting the Computer Sleep option slider to Never in the Energy Saver pane of the System Preferences.
  • There is a known issue in this release where CUDA applications will not automatically engage the discrete GPU on 2012 MacBook Pro models with automatic graphics switching. To run CUDA applications, it is necessary to uncheck the Automatic Graphics Switching checkbox in the Energy Saver pane of the System Preferences.

Nvidia is, of course, working on fixing these issues. We recommend staying tuned to the Nvidia website for updates.

This bug affects Mountain Lion (Mac OSX v10.8) and Lion (Mac OSX v10.7).

Prelude is now available standalone from adobe.com

Adobe Prelude™ CS6, software that streamlines ingesting and logging of file-based footage, is now available as a standalone product. Prelude CS6 was introduced in April 2012 as a part of the CS6 Master Collection, CS6 Production Premium and Creative Cloud. The reaction to Prelude has been very positive and many users wanted to purchase Prelude CS6 as a standalone application.

We are pleased to announce that Prelude CS6 is now available as a standalone product from Adobe.com for $399 for a perpetual license.

For more information on Prelude CS6, please visit: http://www.adobe.com/products/prelude.html
Videos to help you get started with Prelude CS6 can be viewed at http://tv.adobe.com/product/prelude/
You can download a trial of Prelude CS6 as a part CS6 Production Premium from http://www.adobe.com/products/creativesuite/production.html

free videos from Premiere Pro CS6 for Avid and Final Cut Pro Editors, by video2brain

There are a lot of good resources for editors who are familiar with Final Cut Pro and Avid who want to learn how to use Adobe Premiere Pro.

If you’re looking for video training on this subject, I recommend Maxim Jago’s Premiere Pro CS6 for Avid and Final Cut Pro Editors, from video2brain.

You don’t need to take my word for how good this video series is; the fine folks at video2brain have made some videos available as free samples:

Maxim also recorded a full training course for Premiere Pro CS6, which I recommend for beginning and intermediate users, as well as a shorter introductory series for beginners.

If you’re looking for more materials about making the transition from another NLE to Premiere Pro, then you should definitely check out the resources here.

Importing AVCHD media into Premiere Pro on Mac OS X v10.8 (Mountain Lion)

It has come to our attention that Apple has made a change in Mac OS X v10.8 (Mountain Lion) that changes the way an AVCHD folder structure appears to the operating system once imported. This affects the workflow for importing AVCHD media into Premiere Pro CS6.

Once an AVCHD folder structure is copied to a computer running Mac OS X v10.8, the subdirectory that contains the media itself will appear with a single QuickTime document (which is in fact a package) inside it. This will most likely be called ‘PRIVATE’ but may have a different name. The screenshot below shows how this will appear in the Media Browser.

Opening the ‘PRIVATE’ package, either by double-clicking the icon on the right-hand side or single-clicking it on the left of the Media Browser will put the Media Browser into AVCHD mode such that the clips can be imported as normal.

If you prefer to import via the Import dialog box, the QuickTime package will appear with a disclosure triangle which can be twirled down or double-clicked to access the media files.

We have also today discovered a bug when using Premiere Pro with Mac OS X v10.8 in which AVCHD media that has gone offline cannot be successfully relinked. We will be working hard to fix this in a future update, but recommend caution to avoid having to relink offline AVCHD media in the current version of Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.1).

To discuss these issues or to get help with other other questions and issues, come to the Premiere Pro forum.

What’s new in Adobe Story: recording and notes from seminar with Maxim Jago

Recently, Maxim Jago presented a seminar introducing improvements in Adobe Story. The seminar included a demonstration of Adobe Story, as well as a Q&A session with Maxim and the Adobe Story product manager, Anubhav Rohatgi.

Click here to view the recording of the seminar.

To get started with Adobe Story, sign in with your Adobe ID here, or go to the Adobe Story Help & Support page.

Note that Adobe Story Plus is included with a Creative Cloud Membership subscription.

Maxim covered a lot of useful and interesting material, both in the main presentation and in the question-and-answer segment at the end. Here are links to additional information about the main points that Maxim covered in his presentation, as well as questions asked and answered in the Q&A segment:

main topics covered in presentation

miscellaneous and Q&A

new ProRes, Kindle Fire, Nook, iPad, Android, and MXF presets for Adobe Media Encoder CS6

We have recently released new sets of encoding presets for Adobe Media Encoder CS6. These include new presets for some mobile devices, including the Amazon Kindle Fire, Barnes & Noble Nook, iPad, and Android tablets, as well as new presets for XDCAM EX and AVC-Intra in MXF wrappers.

Also, for Mac OS only, we have released ProRes 422 encoding presets.

IMPORTANT: We do not distribute the ProRes encoders or decoders (codecs). You must get those from Apple. The ProRes encoders are included with various Apple video software, such as Final Cut Pro and Motion.

To install the encoding presets in Adobe Media Encoder CS6, do the following:

  1. Download the encoding preset packages:
  2. Extract (unzip) the package.
  3. Start Adobe Media Encoder CS6.
  4. In Adobe Media Encoder CS6, choose Preset > Import and navigate to the encoding preset(s) to import. You can choose multiple encoding presets at a time; it is most convenient to select all of the presets in a folder at once.

This video demonstrates the use of the Preset Browser to apply and manage encoding presets.

If you have any trouble, bring questions and issues to the Adobe Media Encoder forum, and we can help you there.

new RED Digital Cinema importer on Adobe Labs website for CS6 applications

The new plug-ins for RED Digital Cinema cameras on the Adobe Labs website add RedColor3, RedGamma3, and Magic Motion functionality for Premiere Pro CS6, After Effects CS6, Adobe Media Encoder CS6, and Prelude CS6. This importer also contains several bug fixes, including major stability fixes for Mac OS.

Be sure to read the installation instructions for this new software. Pay special attention to the installation location on Windows for Prelude (a 32-bit applications), which is different than for the 64-bit applications.

James Drake posted a walk-through of the installation process at 5K Insight, which also includes some information about the new features and fixes.

Also, make sure that you’ve installed the latest updates for Premiere Pro, After Effects, Prelude, and Adobe Media Encoder. They fix a lot of problems.

If you have any problems or questions, come to the RED User forum, where several Adobe staff members and RED users can help.

Adobe Prelude CS6 (1.0.1) update: bug fixes and feature enhancements

Today, the Adobe Prelude CS6 (1.0.1) update was released.

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates by choosing Help > Updates. The best way to check for updates is by closing all Adobe applications other than Adobe Bridge, and choosing Help > Updates in Adobe Bridge; this ensures that all processes related to Adobe video applications have been quit and can be updated safely.

Ideally, you should install the updates automatically by choosing Help > Updates, but you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Windows or Mac OS.

For information about updates for other Adobe professional video applications, see this page.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Prelude user-to-user forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.


feature enhancements in this update

  • concatenation: You can now combine (concatenate) a series of clips into a single asset as part of the ingesting process. (Enable the Concatenate option in the Ingest dialog box.) Concatenation requires Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 to be installed and running on the same computer system as Prelude.
  • relinking: You can now reconnect a Prelude project to media files that appear offline because they were moved to another location. (Choose File > Relink.)
  • renaming: You can rename a clip in the Project panel by pressing the Return key when the clip is selected.
  • smart rendering: When creating a new asset during either the “partial ingest” or concatenation process, Adobe Media Encoder can create the new asset using the encoded video data from the original assets(s), without re-encoding. This ability to pass the video data through without transcoding is limited to a small number of formats, including DV, DVCPro, and MXF Op1a XDCAM HD and XDCAM EX.
  • API improvements: Improvements to the API for technical partners creating custom panels and markers include improvements for tighter integration and the ability to use time-of-day strings in markers, rather than only ticks or frames as units for markers’ start and end times. This is especially useful when creating applications that create unassociated metadata workflows, including iPad applications.

For more information about many of these features, see Prelude Help.


bugs fixed in this update

  • Markers that start or end outside of the boundaries of a subclip are now visible in the timeline when that subclip is added to a rough cut.
  • Fixed various crashes, hangs, and sources of error messages.

“Jump-start your production with Prelude CS6″ with Wes Plate, seminar recording and notes

Recently, Adobe Prelude product manager Wes Plate presented a seminar introducing Adobe Prelude CS6.

Here’s the recording.

If you don’t yet have Adobe Prelude, you can order it with CS6 Production Premium now … or try it free for 30 days.

Wes covered a lot of useful and interesting material, both in the main presentation and in the question-and-answer segment at the end.

Here’s a brief outline of what Wes talked about, as well as some links to more information about each subject:

What is Adobe Prelude?
Adobe Prelude is an application for ingesting, logging, and optionally transcoding tapeless media and assembling clips into rough cuts for use in an NLE (a nonlinear editing application). In addition to the summary in Wes’s presentation, both video2brain and Lynda.com have summaries that answer the question “What is Adobe Prelude?” in their video training courses.

Adobe Prelude intentionally has low system requirements compared with Premiere Pro, allowing Prelude to function on the sorts of inexpensive laptop computers likely to be used in the field and by production assistants and others who are given the task of logging large amounts of footage.

Adobe Prelude is not a direct replacement for OnLocation, which is an application that was used for tape-based media and is not included in Creative Suite 6 or Creative Cloud software packages. If you are using OnLocation, we encourage you to keep using it. If you want features from OnLocation to be included in future Adobe video software such as Premiere Pro or Prelude, let us know with a feature request.

ingesting, transferring, and transcoding media
You can ingest all or part of an asset, optionally transferring the file to a new location and transcoding it. If you ingest only part of an asset, then this partial ingest requires transcoding, which uses Adobe Media Encoder.

logging and metadata
You can add markers of various kinds to clips in Prelude, and these markers are stored as XMP metadata. This adding of markers, including marking In and Out points to make subclips, is known generally as logging. Prelude is designed to log clips using the keyboard, so it’s especially valuable to learn its keyboard shortcuts.

You aren’t restricted to the default set of markers. You can create your own marker templates and add and remove marker buttons from the interface to suit your needs.

Wes showed how “unassociated metadata” could be recorded during an event by someone watching the event and then later associated with the video shot of that same event.

rough cuts
You can create basic rough cuts in Adobe Prelude and either send them to Premiere Pro on the same computer or save them in a format that can be opened by an NLE on another computer. You can even save a rough cut in the FCP XML format recognized by Final Cut Pro 7 and many other applications. Note that a utility such as 7toX from Intelligent Assistance could be used to convert an FCP XML file to the XML format recognized by Final Cut Pro X.

where to go next
If you have questions, bring them to the Adobe Prelude user-to-user forum, and Wes and others on the Prelude team can help you there.

The Adobe Prelude online Help contains links to a lot of useful information, including many video tutorials.

Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.1) update: bug fixes and improved OpenCL performance

Today, the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.1) update was released.

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates by choosing Help > Updates. The best way to check for updates is by closing all Adobe applications other than Adobe Bridge, and choosing Help > Updates in Adobe Bridge; this ensures that all processes related to Adobe video applications have been quit and can be updated safely.

Ideally, you should install the updates automatically by choosing Help > Updates, but you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Windows or Mac OS by choosing the “Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 6.0.1 Update” for your operating system.

For information about updates for other Adobe professional video applications, see this page.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Premiere Pro forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.

We have also been working with several providers of plug-ins, codecs, and hardware devices to assist them in updating their software to fix some errors and crashes. Please take this opportunity to download and install updated codecs, plug-ins, and drivers from these providers, as relevant to your work. For more information about plug-ins and third-party hardware for Premiere Pro CS6, see this page.

We strongly recommend that users of Premiere Pro on Mac OS update to Mac OSX v10.7.4 for performance and stability improvements in that operating system update.


features added or changed in this update

  • Improved performance using OpenCL, especially when used on Mac OSX v10.7.4 or later.

    For details of GPU acceleration in Premiere Pro, see this page. For details of OpenCL features in Premiere Pro CS6, see this page.

  • Added encoding presets with additional bit-rate settings for XDCAM HD.
  • Added Automatic Peak File Generation preference in the Audio category for turning off automatic peak file generation for imported audio. By default, this preference is enabled and matches the behavior of Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.0).

    When this preference is disabled, importing audio or opening projects will not cause peak files to be generated. If peak files were already generated, then waveforms will be visible. Files imported before the preference was disabled will continue to generate peak files.

  • Enabled “smart rendering” and added Enable Smart Rendering Codec setting to the Video tab of the MXF OP1a exporters for XDCAM HD and XDCAM EX to enable or disable smart rendering for these formats. This option defaults to the off/disabled state. We’ll have more information about this feature in a post on this blog soon.
  • Added support for import of files and use of growing files from Sony XDCAM deck (XDSPE2000)

See details of the Adobe Media Encoder CS6 (6.0.1) update for more information about changes that affect output from Premiere Pro CS6.


bugs fixed in this update

  • Start timecode was not imported or exported correctly when working with AAF files.
  • Some files from the Canon 5D Mark III camera were imported with the wrong timecode.
  • Playing/viewing waveforms in the Source Monitor caused audio dropouts with some XDCAM HD clips.
  • NTSC MXF OP1a files that were exported with drop-frame timecode had video data that was tagged as non-drop-frame.
  • Switching the Renderer project setting from Mercury Playback Engine Software Only to Mercury Playback Acceleration GPU Acceleration on a computer using OpenCL caused Premiere Pro to crash under some circumstances. Switching between the two settings on a computer using CUDA would in some cases cause problems with video and/or audio playback.
  • Crash when using full-screen, cinema mode on some computer systems.
  • Tape capture was not working correctly with some third-party systems.
  • Crash when capturing from tape using some BlackMagic hardware.
  • An extra, black frame was included at the end of the output when exporting to P2 MXF in some circumstances.
  • First two frames were being played twice on external monitor using Matrox MXO2.
  • Crash when using “hover scrub” with Matrox MXO2.
  • Audio/video synchronization was off by a few frames when playing video on external monitor.
  • The Export Frame button was not exporting the correct frame, instead exporting a frame one or two frames away from the current frame.
  • Some audio files and some MXF files would go offline or have their audio reconformed when the project was re-opened or when Premiere Pro was minimized or lost focus.
  • Crash when modifying an effect property while playback was occurring.
  • Hang/freeze when using a dissolve transition on an adjustment layer.
  • Dropped frames and audio/video synchronization issues when exporting to tape using some third-party hardware.
  • Information about dropped frames on output to tape was not accessible to third-party systems.
  • Some QuickTime files were imported with the wrong field order.
  • When audio was sent through a Mercury Transmit plug-in, any number of channels that was not 2 or 6 was treated as mono.
  • In HDV editing mode, File > Export > Tape could not be used with third-party hardware.
  • The current-time indicator (playhead) was not returning to the current time after using the Play Around command.
  • Last several frames of output when exporting to tape were black.
  • When encoding a 23.976 fps video to H.264, the duration of the video in the output .m4v file was too short, and audio drifted out of synchronization with the video.
  • Transparency (alpha channel) information from a dynamically linked After Effects composition was rendered incorrectly in Premiere Pro.
  • Importing some QuickTime OP1a files caused Premiere Pro to hang.
  • The duration of the audio track sent to SpeedGrade using the Send To SpeedGrade command was the length of the entire Premiere Pro sequence, not the length of the work area.
  • Timecode written to trimmed clips using the Project Manager did not match the source timecode for some QuickTime files.
  • Various other crashes.

See details of the Adobe Media Encoder CS6 (6.0.1) update for more information about changes that affect output from Premiere Pro CS6.

“Edit your way faster with Premiere Pro CS6″ with Al Mooney, seminar recording and notes

Recently, Premiere Pro product manager Al Mooney presented a seminar introducing improvements in Premiere Pro CS6.

Here’s the recording.

This seminar was recorded before Premiere Pro CS6 was available. Premiere Pro CS6 is now available, as are other professional video and audio applications in Creative Suite 6 Production Premium, including Adobe Prelude and SpeedGrade. You can order CS6 Production Premium now … or try it free for 30 days.

For details of all that’s new and changed in Premiere Pro CS6, see this page.

Al covered a lot of useful and interesting material, both in the main presentation and in the question-and-answer segment at the end.

Here’s a brief outline of what Al talked about, as well as some links to more information about each subject:

some components of Creative Suite and Creative Cloud other than Premiere Pro

Mercury Playback Engine and performance

user interface redesign, concentration on media

editing efficiencies

effects

audio improvements

tape workflows

miscellaneous and Q&A

Adobe Media Encoder CS6 (6.0.1) update available

Today, the Adobe Media Encoder CS6 (6.0.1) update was released.

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates by choosing Help > Updates. The best way to check for updates is by closing all Adobe applications other than Adobe Bridge, and choosing Help > Updates in Adobe Bridge; this ensures that all processes related to Adobe video applications have been quit and can be updated safely.

Ideally, you should install the updates automatically by choosing Help > Updates, but you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Mac OS or Windows by choosing the “Adobe Media Encoder CS6.0.1″ update for your operating system.

For information about updates for other Adobe professional video applications, see this page.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Adobe Media Encoder forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.


features added or changed in this update

  • Added encoding presets with additional bit-rate settings for XDCAM HD.
  • Enabled “smart rendering” and added a setting to the Video tab of the MXF OP1a exporters to enable or disable smart rendering for these formats.

    Full use of this feature also requires the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.1) update.


bugs fixed in this update

  • Some encoding presets and codecs (MPEG-2, Dolby AC3) were missing from Adobe Media Encoder if activated using a yearly Creative Cloud Membership subscription license.
  • Canon 5D Mark III files were imported and interpreted using the Rec. 601 color space instead of the correct Rec. 709 color space.
  • NTSC MXF OP1a files that were exported with drop-frame timecode had video data that tagged as non-drop-frame.
  • In some cases, 23.976fps H.264 output had incorrect video duration, causing audio and video to be out of synch.
  • Colors shifted in some H.264 and MPEG-2 output.
  • Exporting a WMV file failed in some cases, and in some cases caused audio and video to be out of synch.
  • Some multiplexed H.264 Blu-Ray files caused faulty Blu-Ray Discs in Encore.
  • Import of some files caused the application to hang or took an extremely long time to complete.
  • Some QuickTime files were imported with the wrong field order.
  • Some additional causes of crashes were fixed.

OpenCL and Premiere Pro CS6

Beginning with Premiere Pro CS5, we have been using the GPU on certain graphics cards to process many things within Premiere Pro. This GPU processing (sometimes loosely referred to as “hardware acceleration”) relied on CUDA, a set of technologies from Nvidia.

We got a lot of requests from people using computer systems that couldn’t use CUDA—such as those with built-in GPUs from AMD—to expand our GPU acceleration features to also use OpenCL.

So, we did.

In Premiere Pro CS6, nearly all of the things that can be processed with CUDA on certain Nvidia GPUs can also be processed by OpenCL on certain AMD GPUs.

Let me address some common questions:


What can Premiere Pro CS6 process with OpenCL?

Everything that Premiere Pro CS6 can process with CUDA, with four exceptions:

  • Fast Blur effect
  • Gaussian Blur effect
  • Directional Blur effect
  • Basic 3D effect

In our first iteration of OpenCL processing, we weren’t able to get enough performance improvement for these four effects, so they are for now better left on the CPU. But everything else that Premiere Pro CS6 can process with CUDA can be processed with OpenCL, and that’s a lot.


OK, then. What can Premiere Pro CS6 process with CUDA?

There’s a lot of detail about that here for Premiere Pro CS5 and CS5.5:
“CUDA, Mercury Playback Engine, and Adobe Premiere Pro”

The only thing added for Premiere Pro CS6 is the Push transition.


What are the system requirements for Premiere Pro CS6 OpenCL processing?

AMD Radeon HD 6750M and AMD Radeon HD 6770M graphics card with 1GB VRAM in MacBook Pro computers running Mac OSX v10.7 or later

(See the system requirements page.)

[UPDATE: The Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.2) update added OpenCL and CUDA functionality for the GT 650M GPU, which is in the newer MacBook Pro computers.]


Why only those cards?

We are very firmly committed to making Premiere Pro a stable, reliable, high-performance NLE. This involves thoroughly testing the configurations that we recommend and support. We needed to make sure that we could get the best possible performance and stability with these two very common systems before we could consider broadening our support to other systems.


Will you add more cards later?

We can’t talk about what we’ll do in the future, but I can ask that you look at how few cards Premiere Pro CS5 could use for GPU acceleration when it was first released, and then note how we’ve added cards to the supported list with several updates and upgrades. We make no promises about our future plans, but you may be able to determine something about our thought process by looking to past behavior.


What can I do to get the best performance and stability out of these OpenCL processing features?

The most important thing is to make sure that all of your software is up to date. That means making sure that you’ve got the most recent updates for Premiere Pro (choose Help > Updates), as well as making sure that you’ve got the most up-to-date graphics drivers and operating system updates. We are working with our partners, including the makers of graphics cards and operating systems to ensure that our systems work well together, and the best way for you to take advantage of that cooperation is to keep your software up to date.

The Mac OSX v10.7.4 update makes performance with OpenCL significantly better, and Mac OSX v10.8 makes even more improvements.

For details of all that’s new and changed in Premiere Pro CS6, and how to get it, see this page.

plug-ins and third-party hardware for Premiere Pro CS6

See this page for a list of companies that provide plug-ins for Premiere Pro, including plug-ins for effects, transitions, importing and exporting specific file formats, audio processing, titles, closed captioning, and workflow tools:

Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 In depth: Plug-ins

In addition to listing the plug-ins provided by each company, this page provides links to the companies’ websites, so that you can purchase these plug-ins or find how to contact them for technical support or customer service.

Another great place for information about plug-ins for Premiere Pro and After Effects is the Toolfarm website, which provides an online store as well as tutorials, a forum, and other supporting resources for using plug-ins.

On the hardware compatibility page on the Adobe website, you can find workflow guides for various cameras, as well as documents with details of compatible hardware for GPU acceleration, tape capture, broadcast monitoring, and more.

One of the very big changes in Premiere Pro CS6 is the new Mercury Transmit feature, which makes it much, much easier for third-party hardware developers to write the code necessary to receive video information from Premiere Pro for broadcast monitoring, exporting to tape, et cetera. Check with the vendor for your third-party I/O device to get the up-to-date drivers that make use of Mercury Transmit for Premiere Pro CS6.

If you want to develop plug-ins yourself, see the Premiere Pro Developer Center, where you can download the Premiere Pro SDK and supporting documentation.

Important: There have been few significant changes to the effect plug-in API for Premiere Pro CS6, so you shouldn’t need new versions of most plug-ins for Premiere Pro CS6, if you already have plug-ins that work for Premiere Pro CS5 or CS5.5. There are a few video effects that do require updates; e.g., Boris RED, DVDate, and a few others have needed to make updates to accommodate changes because of the new uninterrupted playback feature. Check the websites of the vendors of your plug-ins to see if you need an update for any reason.

However, beyond changes to the effect plug-ins themselves, some plug-ins come with installers, and (as with CS5.5) these installers may need to be updated to install plug-ins into the correct location.

Toolfarm is maintaining a list of major plug-in vendors and the status of their updates for CS6, and they have some helpful resources for installing plug-ins for which the installers haven’t been updated.

a few Creative Cloud and CS6 resources

We’ve been getting quite a few questions about Creative Cloud, as well as about activation, licensing, and such for CS6 software, so here are a few links to useful resources.

For details of what’s new and changed in the applications in CS6 Production Premium, start with these pages:

ProEXR plug-ins for OpenEXR use in Premiere Pro, Photoshop, and After Effects

fnord software has just announced a new set of ProEXR plug-ins for working with OpenEXR files in Premiere Pro, Photoshop, and After Effects. (See the announcement on the fnord blog for more information.)

OpenEXR is a file format that is used for preserving the color precision and range of high-dynamic range (HDR) imagery, such as when you are working in 32-bpc color mode in After Effects and want to output that full color range when passing the output files off to another system. OpenEXR can also include multiple channels to store the results of multiple render passes from a 3D application, so programs like After Effects and Photoshop can access them.

fnord provides very good instructions in a PDF document for the use of these plug-ins. Be sure to use this documentation, since following instructions is crucial for correct use of this software.

After Effects CS4 and later includes the basic ProEXR plug-ins: OpenEXR importer, IDentifier, and EXtractoR. After Effects CS5.5 and After Effects CS6 include version 1.5 of these plug-ins. Version 1.7 of these plug-ins for After Effects are currently available are free. The primary improvement for After Effects users in v1.7 is that the performance of reading OpenEXR files is much improved.

Writing out multi-channel OpenEXR files from After Effects requires the purchase of the non-free ProEXR plug-in bundle.

See this page in After Effects Help for information about ProEXR plug-ins and OpenEXR files in After Effects.

Premiere Pro CS6: what’s new and changed

Premiere Pro CS6 is available, as are other professional video and audio applications in Creative Suite 6 Production Premium, including Adobe Prelude and SpeedGrade. You can order CS6 Production Premium now … or try it free for 30 days.

Note that Premiere Pro CS6 and all of the other applications in CS6 Production Premium will also be available as part of Adobe Creative Cloud.

Here’s a link to the snazzy summary of what’s new in CS6 professional video and audio applications, with short overview movies about some of the top features. These PDF documents are a much deeper look at what’s new, so be sure to check them out, too:

Here are a few good sources of video tutorials and video overviews for Premiere Pro CS6 and related software:

  • Video2Brain provides a comprehensive set of movies (by me) covering every new and changed feature in Premiere Pro CS6 and Adobe Media Encoder CS6.
  • Rich Harrington has a video training course on the new features on Lynda.com.
  • Several Adobe personnel and partners provides feature overviews and tutorials on the Adobe TV site.

Scott Simmons has a good review and overview on the ProVideo Coalition site.

For details of what was added and changed from Premiere Pro CS5 to Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

If you want to ask questions about these new and changed features, come on over to the Premiere Pro user-to-user forum. That’s the best place for questions. Questions left in comments on a blog post are much harder to work with; the blog comment system just isn’t set up for conversations.


top new features in Premiere Pro CS6

  • redesigned, efficient, customizable user interface
  • dynamic trimming, including trimming with JKL and other keyboard shortcuts
  • adjustment layers
  • Warp Stabilizer effect
  • expanded multi-camera editing, with more multicam angles and improved interface
  • improved performance, extending GPU processing to some systems using OpenCL
  • new and more powerful audio features, including adaptive audio tracks, customizable audio channel mapping for output, and improved Audio Mixer panel
  • new native import of ARRI Alexa, RED Scarlet, RED Epic, and Canon Cinema EOS C300 footage
  • improved color features, including integration with SpeedGrade and redesigned Three-Way Color Corrector effect
  • improved workflows with other applications in Adobe Creative Suite, as well as with Final Cut Pro and Avid software
  • faster Adobe Media Encoder, redesigned to make authoring for multiple outputs and mobile devices easier
  • enhanced Adobe Encore for creation of DVDs, Blu-ray Discs, and web DVDs

(nearly) all new and changed features in Premiere Pro CS6

Here is a virtually comprehensive list of changes, with detail beyond the summaries of the top items listed above. We’ll be posting a lot more detail over the coming weeks, and the outline below will be populated with links to in-depth articles and tutorials, so bookmark this page and check back.

user interface

  • button editor, with which you can customize the buttons in various panels
  • improved icon view in Project panel and Media Browser panel, with ability to scrub/preview media in thumbnails (“hover scrubbing”)
  • improved usage indicators in Project panel, including tooltips and indications of which sequence(s) a clip is used in
  • new default Editing workspace with better use of screen space for video content
  • option to remove work area bar and instead use In and Out points for features that previously relied on the work area
  • full-screen playback on primary monitor
  • dozens of new and changed keyboard shortcuts, with option to continue to use Premiere Pro CS5.5 keyboard shortcuts
  • options to show or hide user interface items such as time ruler markings
  • new settings buttons and menus in monitor panels for easy access to commonly used view options
  • gestural control on Mac computers with trackpads, including pinching to zoom and using two-fingered gestures for scrolling
  • full-screen “cinema” mode that shows only content with no UI chrome

importing and sequence setup

  • integration with Adobe Prelude for ingest, logging, transcoding, and rough cuts
  • alert when adding clip to an empty sequence if sequence settings don’t match footage characteristics, with option to match sequence settings to clip
  • new native import of ARRI Alexa, RED Scarlet, RED Epic, and Canon Cinema EOS C300 footage
  • new HD color bars and tone, which comply with ARIB STD-B28
  • ability to drag items from the Media Browser panel to the Project panel to import them

editing

  • improved markers, including import of markers from Adobe Prelude and display of marker comments in time ruler
  • dynamic, keyboard-driven trimming in the monitor panels and Timeline panel, without needing to enter the Trim Monitor
  • new keyboard shortcuts for working with edit points, navigating in the timeline, and performing other basic editing tasks
  • new Render In To Out command for rendering preview for span between In and Out points marked in a sequence
  • ability to copy a clip in the Timeline panel by Alt-dragging (Windows) or Option-dragging (Mac OS)

effects and color

  • Send To SpeedGrade, which exports a sequence for color work in SpeedGrade
  • Warp Stabilizer effect
  • Rolling Shutter Repair effect
  • uninterrupted playback, which continues previews even while you modify effect properties and perform many other operations
  • improved Dynamic Link, including removal of limitation of Dynamic Link to only work within a suite (i.e., Dynamic Link will now work between applications purchased as individual products)
  • redesigned Three-Way Color Corrector effect
  • double-click to apply effect to selected clips

performance

  • GPU processing (Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration) extended to use OpenCL on some systems: AMD Radeon HD 6750M and AMD Radeon HD 6770M graphics card with 1GB VRAM in MacBook Pro computers running Mac OSX v10.7
  • use of GPU acceleration by additional effects and transitions, including Warp Stabilizer effect and Push transition
  • Mercury Transmit, a new interface making it easier for third-party I/O hardware manufacturers to interface with Premiere Pro, allowing for more robust and stable systems

audio

  • new Audio Mixer panel, with features and design from Audition
  • redesigned Audio Meters panel
  • new standard audio track type, which can contain either mono or stereo audio
  • extremely flexible and customizable multichannel audio mapping for output
  • ability to choose which clip to use timecode from when using merged clips

exporting and Adobe Media Encoder

  • new Preset Browser in Adobe Media Encoder for finding and using encoding presets
  • parellel encoding in Adobe Media Encoder, which encodes multiple outputs simultaneously for greater performance
  • redesigned Adobe Media Encoder user interface, with panel-based workspaces as in other Adobe professional video applications
  • dozens of new keyboard shortcuts in Adobe Media Encoder
  • new scaling and cropping options in Adobe Media Encoder, which make it easy to resolve mismatches between output dimensions and source dimensions (e.g., prevent black bars)
  • Export to tape will output the sequence duration between the In and Out points instead of the work area if the work area is hidden.

miscellaneous

  • removed Device Central, but extended encoding presets for mobile devices in Adobe Media Encoder effectively fill a similar need

Timecode issue followup

Hi, it’s David McGavran again.

Last week, I posted about a timecode issue that a user found with Premiere Pro and QTChange. We contacted the author of QTChange, and they were very responsive. They have updated QTChange to resolve this issue and have released version 2.18, which works correctly with Premiere Pro. So, if you use QTChange, grab the new version.

I would again like to thank Jeff for bringing this to our attention and VideoToolShed for turning around a fix so soon.

If you have a bug to report in Premiere Pro, please do so here. For more information about reporting bugs, making feature requests, getting help, and communicating with us, see this page.

how to get the latest information from Adobe professional video and audio teams

Our executives announced a while ago that we would be releasing new versions of our software in the “first half of 2012″.

As you may have noticed, we’re beginning to show some details and announce presentations of new versions of our professional video and audio software.

If you want to stay up to date and get the big news as soon as it’s available, I recommend subscribing to the team blogs for the video and audio applications. If you’d like to keep up with a daily stream of information beyond the big stuff that goes on our team blogs, then you should also consider following us on Facebook and/or Twitter.

Here are a few posts that give the details for each major area:

A couple of timecode issues

Hi, I’m David McGavran, the Premiere Pro engineering manager.

Thanks to a recent report from Jeff Harrell, we have found a couple of issues with timecode, one of which appears to be in Premiere Pro, and one of which appears to be in QTChange:

1. QTChange uses a value for calculating frame rate and timecode of 23.98 (2398/100) instead of the expected 23.976 (23976/1000 or 24000/1001). We have put a patch in place in a future version of Premiere Pro to deal with other software using this value, and we have contacted the author of QTChange to see if they are interested in improving how they write timecode.

2.  Premiere Pro also has an issue with round-tripping start timecode with AAF files. This is our bug. We have fixed this bug in an internal build, and we are now testing it and determining how we will be able to address this issue in a future release of Premiere Pro.

We really appreciate the fact that one of our users was able to help us to find and isolate these issues. If you encounter such a problem, please let us know. The best way to let us know about a bug is by submitting a bug report. You can (and should) also write in to our forums and ask for help there, and maybe one of us will jump in and help you out on the forum.

I will be at NAB this year running around so come find me and say “hi”. Ask at the Adobe booth; they’ll know where I am.

Thanks for listening, and thanks for letting us know how we can better help you and make the NLE that you want!

Adobe Story update: new and changed features (15March2012)

This week, we released an update to Adobe Story. When you start the Adobe Story desktop application, you should be prompted to update the application. After you have accepted this invitation to update the application, the update will be downloaded and installed.

In addition to several bug fixes, this update adds many new features. You can see the details of what was added and changed in this update in the release notes.

Here are the high points:

If you have questions or would like to give us feedback about Adobe Story, please come to the Adobe Story user forum. If you’d like to keep up-to-date with news about Adobe Story, here are a few ways to do so.

“Accelerate your RED workflow with Premiere Pro” seminar recording and notes

Recently, Adobe and RED presented an hour-long online seminar about using Adobe software with RED Digital Cinema cameras.

Representing RED was Ted Schilowitz (“Leader of the Rebellion”), and representing Adobe was Wes Howell, software quality engineer.

To watch the recording, click this link.

Ted and Wes talked about quite a few things in this seminar. Here’s a quick summary, with links to resources for more information about the subjects that they covered:

  • Ted showed two RED cameras, the Scarlet and the EPIC, and explained their similarities and differences. He gave some useful details about the EPIC camera’s ability to record at a greater frame rate at large frame sizes.

    To use EPIC or Scarlet footage in Premiere Pro CS5.5 or After Effects CS5.5, you must install the EPIC and Scarlet importer. This importer plug-in does not work with Premiere Pro CS5 or After Effects CS5.

  • Ted also showed a RED Rocket card and explained the performance improvements that can be achieved with this card.

    Note that users of Premiere Pro CS5 or After Effects CS5 must have the 5.0.2 or 10.0.1 update for these applications to use a RED Rocket card. These are the same updates that are required for the CS5 applications to use RMD (RED metadata) files and the updated color science. The CS5.5 applications have these changes built in.

  • Wes showed the Media Browser, which makes browsing and importing media in tapeless formats much more convenient—especially when working with spanned clips.

  • Wes showed a few other tips for setting up Premiere Pro and After Effects to best work with RED files:
  • Wes also showed the basics of using time-remapping—which can be done in Premiere Pro or After Effects—and discussed the use of the Warp Stabilizer.

  • Both Ted and Wes talked about hardware for optimum performance with Premiere Pro and After Effects. For information about hardware decisions that influence performance, see this page.

Some aspects of this seminar were specific to Premiere Pro CS5.5 and After Effects CS5.5, but most of it was also relevant to users of the CS5 versions of these applications. For details of what’s changed with regard to RED features in Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

If you have any questions about working with RED cameras and footage, bring them to the RED User forum, where several member of the Adobe and RED teams hang out. If you have questions about Premiere Pro in general, bring them to the Adobe Premiere Pro user-to-user forum.

Robbie Carman’s “Migrating from Final Cut Pro 7 to Premiere Pro”

There are a lot of good resources for editors who are familiar with Final Cut Pro who want to learn how to use Adobe Premiere Pro. Among the best of these resources are those created by Robbie Carman and his partners.

If you’re looking for video training on this subject, I recommend Robbie’s Migrating from Final Cut Pro 7 to Premiere Pro, available on the Lynda.com website. In this series, Robbie is friendly, casual, and engaging while imparting a lot of useful information; he seems to be a natural teacher. I especially appreciate how much Robbie’s years of experience as an editor and colorist come through in his evaluations of the pros and cons of certain ways of working.

You don’t need to take my word for how good this video series is; the fine folks at Lynda.com have made some videos available as free samples:

If you’re looking for a book on the subject, then you should definitely check out Robbie’s book Editor’s Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro. (It also contains several hours of videos on its companion DVD.)

Robbie also recorded a one-hour online seminar about color correction and grading with Premiere Pro, which I highly recommend.

recordings and notes for “Ask a Video Pro” and “Ask a CS Pro” webinars

Over the past several months, we’ve put on a large number of online seminars (webinars) about After Effects, Audition, Premiere Pro, and other applications in Creative Suite Production Premium. For folks who couldn’t attend the live seminars, we recorded the sessions and made them available online.

Here’s a link to the page listing upcoming webinars.

Here are links to notes and recordings for past webinars:

We typically announce webinars on our Facebook and Twitter accounts, as well as on our team blogs, so subscribe to keep informed of when these sessions are occurring:

Confessions of a Switcher: Moving to Adobe Premiere Pro and using an HP Workstation

Recently, Christine Steele presented an hour-long online seminar about switching to Adobe Premiere Pro, in which she focused on the hardware requirements for video editing.

To watch the recording, click this link.

Christine talked about quite a few things in this seminar. Here are links to resources for more information about the subjects that she covered:

Jon Carr on using Production Premium CS5.5 on Vincent LaForet’s Möbius

On December 8 writer, producer and vfx artist Jon Carr presented how his team leveraged the capabilities of Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Production Premium to help complete the short film Möbius edited by Vashi Nedomansky and directed by Vincent LaForet.

Here is a recording of the session.

You can watch Möbius here: http://vimeo.com/31525127

Möbius was shot using a prototype of the new Canon EOS C300 camera and was edited using Adobe Premiere Pro with effects shots produced using Adobe After Effects.  Also integral to post production process were Adobe Story, Adobe Photoshop Extended and Adobe Media Encoder.

Here are some highlights from Jon’s presentation:

Adobe Story

  • Plays nicely with other popular screenwriting tools such as Final Draft
  • The collaboration features of Adobe Story allowed Jon and his co-writer Justin Hamilton to share the script, mark up and make comments and have a dialog about needed changes.
  • The outline view lists scenes and uses color-coded dots to identify characters used in each scene. This feature helped Jon’s team save money by identifying a scene requiring a single actor that could be rewritten to instead not use that character.

Adobe Premiere Pro

  • Editorial started with 18 hours of source material and a tight schedule so editor Vashi Nedomansky was able to pass Adobe Premiere Pro project files back and forth with other team members to help identify selects and speed the editing process.
  • Other NLEs would have required the C300’s Canon XF media to be transcoded before it could be edited, but Adobe Premiere Pro was able to work with the media natively so no transcoding was necessary.

Adobe After Effects

  • Jon showed us how he exported a frame from After Effects and used the Clone Stamp Tool to quickly paint out graffiti on the rocks behind the actor.
  • The saved frame was then brought back into After Effects where he used the cleaned up rock to cover over the painted section.

Adobe Media Encoder

 

More details about Möbius can be found on Vincent LaForet’s blog at http://blog.vincentlaforet.com/

 

You can also watch a video featuring Jon and Vincent on Adobe TV.

You can follow Jon Carr on Twitter at @jon_carr

video training providers for Adobe Premiere Pro

We like to point people to free video tutorials as much as possible, such as in this set of resources for beginners; but we often get asked where people can get more complete, in-depth training materials. Of course, many of these in-depth materials are not free, since creating a lengthy, deep set of video training materials is the sort of work that people tend to want to get paid for. This article is a brief summary of the best providers of paid video training that I know of. In all cases, you can find free sample videos on the websites of these providers, which they’ve generously provided as a way for you to try out their materials before you buy anything.

  • video2brain: Since they started doing English-language training a couple of years ago, video2brain has shown a strong commitment to providing high-quality video training for Adobe Premiere Pro. I helped to create some of the Premiere Pro courses, but mostly Jan Ozer and Maxim Jago have been behind the very strong video training for Premiere Pro. In addition to giving you the ability to purchase DVDs of individual courses, video2brain also has subscription options that give you access to all of their materials.

  • Total Training: The strong training created by Luisa Winters has kept Total Training at the top of the heap for Premiere Pro. Be sure to check out the CS5.5 Production Premium course, which I almost missed because it wasn’t listed with the Premiere Pro courses. You can order DVDs of the courses, or you can subscribe for online access.

  • Lynda.com: For several years, Lynda.com has been providing video training for Premiere Pro. I’m encouraged to see that they’ve recently added courses by such luminaries as Robbie Carman and Rich Harrington to strengthen their offerings for Premiere Pro. Lynda.com has several different subscription options.

  • Eran Stern’s The Best of Premiere Pro: You can see what I have to say about Eran’s terrific 4-hour video training course for Premiere Pro in the review that I wrote here.

  • Creative Edge: The Creative Edge website collects resources from several providers into one subscription service, so you can watch videos by Total Training, some by video2brain, and so on–all in one place.

Did I miss any providers of video training that you like? Let me know in the comments.

Also see the companion article, “video training providers for After Effects”

(Full disclousure: I’ve worked with most of the organizations listed here–peforming such tasks as creating videos for them, helping them plan their courses, and reviewing their materials. None of them pay me, though.)

Richard Harrington seminar on mastering Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline panel

Last week, Richard Harrington presented a seminar on mastering the Timeline panel and related features in Adobe Premiere Pro.

Here’s the recording.

Richard covered a lot of useful and interesting material, both in the main presentation and in the question-and-answer segment at the end.

Here’s a brief outline of what Richard talked about, as well as some links to more information about each subject:

recommended resources and contact information

getting started and configuring the user interface

basic editing

audio

miscellaneous questions and answers

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.2) update: Maximus functionality and bug fixes

Today, the Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.2) update was released.

Ideally, you should install the update by choosing Help > Updates.

However, you can also directly download the update packages from the download pages for Windows or Mac OS, using the “Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 5.5.2 update” link. If you use the manual process, you must choose the correct patcher based on your original installation type.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Adobe Premiere Pro forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.

There are a few big bug fixes and and a new capability in this update. Also, note that this update includes all fixes and changes made in the Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.1) update.

You should also install the most recent updates for other applications while you’re at it.

Note: If you have installed the RED Epic importer plug-in from Adobe Labs, the Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.2) update will overwrite it with the built-in RED importer plug-in. To restore the functionality of the RED Epic importer, just re-install the RED Epic importer plug-in after installing the Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.2) update.


bug fixes

Note that we were able to find and fix a lot of these problems because of bug reports from users. Keep ‘em coming.

Here’s a list of bugs fixed in this update:

  • Eyedroppers did not work on Mac OSX v10.7 (Lion).
  • The Timecode effect overlay was not rendered.
  • Closed captions were rendered in the wrong place, sometimes entirely offscreen.
  • Enabling the display of closed captions would cause error messages to appear.
  • Premiere Pro would crash or exhibit other instability when trimming with third-party I/O hardware (such as Matrox, Blackmagic, and AJA hardware) installed.

added ability for Premiere Pro to take advantage of Nvidia Maximus configuration for CUDA processing

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.2) adds the ability to take advantage of a Tesla C2075 card for CUDA processing when that card is installed along with a Quadro card, which handles OpenGL processing. This configuration—in which the Quadro card handles OpenGL processing while the Tesla card handles CUDA processing—is referred to as a Maximus configuration.

We have tested the Tesla C2075 card with the Quadro 2000 and Quadro 4000 cards, and the Maximus configuration should work with all other Fermi-class Quadro cards, as well. If you find otherwise, come to the Premiere Pro hardware forum and let us know.

The Maximus capability is imparted by the driver for the Tesla card, so you will want to make sure that you have the up-to-date drivers for your cards. See the Nvidia website for drivers. Our testing was done with the 276.14 driver for the Tesla C2075.

Note that the Maximus technology is different from SLI, and this update does not add the ability for Premiere Pro to use multiple GPUs for CUDA computation by means of SLI.

Tip: It’s always important to make sure that you have a power supply for your computer that is adequate to provide power for all of your components. If you don’t, then you can have all sorts of problems with stability and performance. The Nvidia Tesla cards make this even more apparent, since they draw more power than many other components. So, be sure to follow Nvidia’s installation instructions, and check to make sure that your power supply is adequate for all that’s being demanded of it.

For a complete list of graphics cards for which the CUDA acceleration features are provided and supported, see the Premiere Pro system requirements page. For more information about CUDA processing and the Mercury playback engine in general, see “CUDA, Mercury Playback Engine, and Adobe Premiere Pro”.


other software updates known to address problems with Premiere Pro

We have also been working with several providers of plug-ins, codecs, and hardware devices (such as Matrox, Nvidia, AJA, and Blackmagic) to assist them in updating their software to fix some errors and crashes. Please take this opportunity to download and install updated codecs, plug-ins, and drivers from these providers, as relevant to your work.


known issues

  • Possible hang on start if firewall or other software (such as ZoneAlarm or FileMaker) blocks communication between Premiere Pro and related components. (See this Technical Support document for more information and solutions.)
  • Using eyedroppers in Premiere Pro CS5.5 with the 5.5.2 update on Mac OSX v10.5.8 (Leopard) can cause a crash. If you are using Leopard, either upgrade to Mac OSX v10.6.8 or v10.7 or do not install the Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.2) update.

Robbie Carman on color grading and correction in Creative Suite Production Premium

Last week, Robbie Carman presented a seminar on color grading and color correction in Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.

Here’s the recording.

Robbie covered a lot of useful and interesting material, both in the main presentation and in the question-and-answer segment at the end.

Here’s a brief outline of what Robbie talked about, as well as some links to more information about each subject:

recommended resources and contact information

scopes and monitoring video

basic color correction effects, correcting for exposure and color cast

correcting skin color

grading sky colors, cleverly using the Titler to create mattes

vignettes in After Effects, and introduction to Color Finesse

miscellaneous questions and answers

Adobe Reel Challenge

Adobe is inviting you to participate in the Adobe Reel Challenge.

If you don’t already have Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Production Premium or Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, we invite you to download the free 30-day trial version (or go ahead and buy the full version).

Once you have the software, check out the resources for learning Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects, as well as resources from Carey Dissmore specifically tailored to give you what you need to edit your demo reel with Adobe Premiere Pro.

When you’re finished, you can upload your demo reel for others to see on the Adobe Reel Challenge group page on Vimeo.

Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5 (5.5.1) update: bug fixes

Today, the Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5 (5.5.1) update was released.

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates by choosing Help > Updates.

Ideally, you should install the updates automatically by choosing Help > Updates, but you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Mac OS or Windows by choosing the “Adobe Media Encoder CS 5.5.1″ update.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Adobe Media Encoder forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.

This is also a good time to install updates for other applications, including Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects. See this page for details. (Important: Some of these updates must be manually downloaded; they are not installed automatically by choosing choosing Help > Updates.)


bugs fixed in this update

  • Adobe Media Encoder wasn’t noticing files dropped into watch folders by other computers, making use of AME across a network fail in some cases.
  • The current-time indicator wasn’t updating when encoding audio files.
  • Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5 wouldn’t start if Adobe Media Encoder CS5 was running.
  • Media from QuickTime reference files from Avid Unity systems wasn’t imported.
  • Encoding would fail if an item was added to a watch folder when encoding of another watch folder was paused.
  • Incorrect timecode and codec metadata was written for AVC-Intra exports.
  • Import of ProRes files with four tracks of audio from ATOMOS devices failed.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.1) update: bug fixes, including some for Mac OSX v10.7 (Lion) compatibility

Today, the Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.1) update was released.

Ideally, you should install this update by choosing Help > Updates.

However, if you need to download the update packages manually, you can do so from the download pages for Windows or Mac OS, using the “Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 5.5.1 update” link. You must choose the correct patcher based on your original installation type—electronic download or DVD.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Adobe Premiere Pro forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.

You should also install updates for your other applications while you’re at it.

Note: If you have installed the RED Epic importer plug-in from Adobe Labs, the Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.1) update will overwrite it with the built-in RED importer plug-in. To restore the functionality of the RED Epic importer, just re-install the RED Epic importer plug-in after installing the Premiere Pro CS5.5 (5.5.1) update.


bug fixes

There are a lot of bug fixes in this update.

Note that we were able to find and fix a lot of these problems because of the great feedback that we get through bug reports and crash reports.

Here’s list of the significant bugs fixed in this update:

  • Improved playback/scrubbing performance of footage from DSLR cameras.
  • Media from Avid Unity QuickTime reference files was not imported.
  • XML project files created by Premiere Pro did not work with DaVinci Resolve.
  • On Mac OSX v10.7 (Lion), the Universal Counting Leader was missing countdown numbers.
  • On Mac OSX v10.7 (Lion), Premiere Pro would crash when quitting.
  • Preview in the Capture panel was not functioning properly for HDV footage.
  • Image sequences lost their frame rates.
  • Edges of a clip were highlighted during transitions/dissolves when using CUDA processing.
  • Projects created by importing Final Cut Pro XML projects that contain multiple mono clips would lose some audio when the project was closed and reopened.
  • Exporting to a QuickTime movie using DVCPRO HD settings would not complete under some circumstances, including if an image, graphic, or synthetic element was in the sequence.
  • Using CUDA-accelerated Invert effect would reposition the clip.
  • Premiere Pro could not find files after changing the location of the project.
  • If an After Effects composition with a background color other than black was included in a sequence and Mercury Playback GPU Acceleration was enabled, the alpha channel transparency of the composition was ignored.
  • MXF files created by Premiere Pro were not readable by Sony XDCAM HD decks, Final Cut Pro, or Avid Media Composer.
  • ProRes files created by an ATOMOS device with four tracks of audio were not imported correctly.
  • MCC closed caption files exported from MacCaption failed to appear in the Premiere Pro Program Monitor under some conditions.
  • Incorrect data was being written to XML files for AVC Intra exports.
  • Opacity effects were being ignored after a second transition when CUDA processing (Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration) was enabled.
  • Premiere Pro would hang or crash when loading a merged clip with disabled audio channels.
  • various other crashes

other software updates known to address problems with Premiere Pro

We have also been working with several providers of plug-ins, codecs, and hardware devices (such as Cineform, AJA, Nvidia, and BlackMagic) to assist them in updating their software to fix some errors and crashes. Please take this opportunity to download and install updated codecs, plug-ins, and drivers from these providers, as relevant to your work.


known issues

  • On Mac OSX v10.7 (Lion), eyedroppers do not behave correctly in Premiere Pro CS5.5 with the 5.5.1 update installed.
  • On Mac OSX v10.6 (Snow Leopard) and v10.7 (Lion), in Premiere Pro CS5.5 with the 5.5.1 update installed, closed captions are not shown in the correct position in the Program Monitor—and are often not visible because they are drawn offscreen. Output of closed captions is not affected; this bug only applies to preview in the Program Monitor.
  • Possible hang on start if firewall or other software (such as ZoneAlarm or FileMaker) blocks communication between Premiere Pro and related components. (See this Technical Support document for more information and solutions.)

What the Adobe acquisition of IRIDAS technology means for our professional video applications

As you may already have seen in the official press release, Adobe has just acquired technology from IRIDAS, the makers of the SpeedGrade line of color applications, as well as several other tools for the professional film and video market.

We’re excited.

One of the major reasons that we’re excited is that we know that the Adobe team will be enriched by the addition of the IRIDAS team—with their deep knowledge of color science, light, and image processing. They’ve done a great job developing world-class products.

With the addition of this set of high-end technologies, we’re even better able to deliver on our commitment to provide video professionals with the tools that you need. Not only have we listened to your requests for better, faster, and more powerful color grading and finishing tools—but we’ve also looked ahead to the future needs of professional video, including HDR (high dynamic range) and raw video workflows.

Though we can’t comment on the details of future product versions, we can point to our history of ever-increasing integration between our applications as an indication of why we acquired these technologies. We look forward to the new workflows that may be enabled by future integration work.

How would you like to see these applications integrated? Feel free to give us feedback, either through the usual feature-request form or in comments on this blog post.

You should also come and talk with us on the new Adobe SpeedGrade forum.

Be sure to check out the official press release, which has lots of additional information, as well as some insight from Jim Guerard and Lin Sebastian Kayser. Jim has also shared some thoughts on this matter in a blog post here.

free sample chapters and videos from An Editor’s Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro

Peachpit Press recently released An Editor’s Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro, by Robbie Carman, Jeff Greenberg, and Richard Harrington.

This book is an excellent resource for experienced editors to learn Adobe Premiere Pro. It begins from an assumption that you already know about video editing in general and only need to learn the details of the features and workflows specific to Adobe Premiere Pro and its companion applications. (I’m quite sure that I’d have the same very high regard for this book even if I hadn’t been its technical editor.)

You don’t need to take my word for it, though. The fine folks at Peachpit Press have made four chapters available as free samples: three as PDF documents and one as an HTML document.

The book also contains a DVD with approximately 5 hours of video lessons. We’ve put a few of the videos on Adobe TV so that you can check them out:

There are many other useful resources for learning Premiere Pro, both for the experienced editor and for the beginner.

Adobe Premiere Pro, Nvidia CUDA drivers, and Mac OSX v10.7 (Lion)

If you are using the version 4.0.31 CUDA driver from Nvidia on Mac OSX v10.7, you may notice that the Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration setting is unavailable. This version of the driver disables the CUDA processing features of Premiere Pro if the operating system is running the 32-bit kernel; the reason for this is that there is a conflict between the driver and the Mac OSX v10.7 operating system. For drivers earlier than 4.0.31, a crash happens when a 64-bit application runs on the 32-bit OS kernel. With the updated 4.0.31 driver, Premiere Pro will continue to run, but the Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration settings will be disabled.

This is a temporary situation which is currently being worked on by both Nvidia and Apple, and updates to both the Mac OSX v10.7 operating system and the Nvidia CUDA drivers are expected soon to address this issue.

In the meantime, you can do one of two things:

  • Run the 32-bit operating system kernel, which for now disables CUDA processing.
  • Run the 64-bit operating system kernel, which allows CUDA processing.

Note: By default, Mac OSX v10.7 (Lion) uses the 64-bit kernel, so you shouldn’t need to do anything unless you’ve previously changed to the 32-bit kernel.

This issue does not exist for Mac OSX v10.6.8 (Snow Leopard).

For details regarding choosing between the 32-bit and 64-bit OS kernels, see this page on the Apple website:
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3773

Easing the transition to Adobe Premiere Pro: Ask a CS Pro session with Al Mooney

Last week, Al Mooney presented a seminar on easing the transition to Adobe Premiere Pro from another NLE, such as Final Cut Pro.

Here’s the recording.

(Note: If the Adobe Connect session loses audio/video synch, just click the playhead in Adobe Connect, and it will re-synchronize.)

In addition to the information that Al provided, these resources should help you to get started with Premiere Pro if you know Final Cut Pro or Avid Media Composer.

For more information about making the transition from Final Cut Pro to Premiere Pro (including a limited-time offer to save 50% off the price of Premiere Pro or Production Premium), see this page. If you want to try Premiere Pro for free, you can do so for 30 days.

Here’s a brief outline of what Al talked about, as well as some links to more information about each subject:

main presentation

question-and-answer session

Several of the items above relate to performance and hardware requirements, which we get a lot of questions about. So we put together this page full of resources about making Adobe Premiere Pro (and After Effects) work faster.

Carey Dissmore shows how to edit a demo reel using Adobe Premiere Pro

Last week, Carey Dissmore presented a seminar on how to edit a demo reel in Adobe Premiere Pro.

Here’s the recording.

Carey covered a lot of useful and interesting material, both in the main presentation and in the question-and-answer segment at the end. Because Carey has spent a lot of his career using Final Cut Pro, much of his presentation focused on how he is making the transition to Premiere Pro and what similarities and differences are between the two applications. I recommend that anyone who uses (or wants to use) a non-linear editor check out the recording.

For more information about making the transition from Final Cut Pro to Premiere Pro (including a limited-time offer to save 50% off the price of Premiere Pro or Production Premium), see this page.

I should also point out that Carey will be doing a hands-on, interactive workshop on this same topic at the motion conference in October.

Here’s a brief outline of what Carey talked about, as well as some links to more information about each subject:

introduction, setup, and importing

basic editing

interchange with After Effects

interchange with Final Cut Pro 7 and exporting

miscellaneous questions and answers

FAQ list for Adobe Premiere Pro

We’ve recently added several entries to the Premiere Pro FAQ list.

Video2Brain provides video versions of many of these frequently asked questions and answers at Premiere Pro Frequently Asked Questions and After Effects & Premiere Pro Performance Workshop.

We have an After Effects FAQ list, too.

Color correction and color grading tutorials

Andrew Devis, Karl Soule, Robbie Carman, Jarle Leirpoll, and Jeff Sengstack have all been creating excellent video tutorials about color correction and color grading recently, so I thought that it would be useful to gather links to them together in one place for convenience.

Several of these tutorials go far beyond just showing the UI controls in a specific piece of software; they also give great advice that’s relevant to color correction with any tool, such as working in a room with constant lighting and frequently resetting your eyes to real-world neutral by looking away from the computer screen.

There’s more information about color correction in general and Color Finesse specifically on the Adobe website:

Robbie Carman’s color correction and color grading webinar

Karl Soule’s color correction and color grading tutorials

Andrew Devis’s color correction and color grading tutorials

Jeff Sengstack’s color correction and color grading tutorials

Jarle Leirpoll’s color correction and color grading tutorial

updates for Adobe Media Encoder, Premiere Pro, After Effects, Prelude, Audition, and SpeedGrade

This is a good time to install updates for CC, CS6, CS5.5, and CS5 versions of the Adobe video applications, since several significant updates have recently been released.

The best way to check for updates is by choosing Help > Updates.

We have also been working with several providers of plug-ins, codecs, and hardware devices to assist them in updating their software to fix some errors and crashes. Please take this opportunity to download and install updated codecs, plug-ins, and drivers from these providers, as relevant to your work.

Updates are cumulative. If you install an update, you get all of the fixes and features in previous updates for the same version of the application.

Here are links to details of the most recent updates for each version of the Adobe professional video and audio applications:

latest CC updates

latest CS6 updates

latest CS5.5 updates

latest CS5 updates

latest CS4 updates


archived lists of all updates

The lists above give the most recent updates within each major version.

The lists below give a historical record of each update, not just the latest updates within each major version.

After Effects

Audition and Soundbooth

Adobe Media Encoder

Premiere Pro

SpeedGrade

Prelude

Quadro 4000 driver and CUDA driver update for Mac OSX

We have seen many reports that a conflict between the drivers for some Nvidia cards and the Mac OSX v10.6.8 (Snow Leopard) and v10.7 (Lion) updates caused problems with various software, including Adobe Premiere Pro.

Here are instructions from our colleagues at Nvidia for updating the drivers to fix these problems:

The CUDA 4.0.21 driver is now posted that officially supports Mac OSX v10.6.8 (Snow Leopard) and v10.7 (Lion). These are the steps needed to ensure that the CUDA driver is installed properly. We are in the process of updating the CUDA automatic driver update so users will get this notification automatically.

Here are the installation steps for Quadro 4000 for Mac on Mac OSX v10.6.8 and v10.7:

  1. Install the Mac OSX update (if you haven’t already done so).
  2. Install the Quadro 4000 driver for Mac 10.6.8 (Snow Leopard).
    http://www.nvidia.com/object/quadro-macosx-256.02.25f01-driver.html
    (Note: This driver was last updated on 6/24/2011 and is still the correct driver.)
    After installation, it will ask to reboot.
  3. Install the CUDA for Mac driver (4.0.21) from this direct link.
    http://developer.download.nvidia.com/compute/cuda/4_0/drivers/devdriver_4.0.21_macos.dmg

If you have problems with the update, let Nvidia know. They’re monitoring this issue on their forums here:
http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=203839.

We’re monitoring the Premiere Pro aspect of this issue on the Adobe user-to-user forum here:
http://forums.adobe.com/message/3761931

For details of CUDA and the Mercury Playback Engine, including answers to frequently asked questions, see this page:
“CUDA, Mercury Playback Engine, and Adobe Premiere Pro”

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.4) update: fix for crash on Mac computers with ATI cards

Today, the Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.4) update was released.

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates for Premiere Pro CS5 by choosing Help > Updates.

Later—but not yet—you’ll be able to directly download the update packages from the download page for Mac OS, using the “Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 5.0.4 update” link. This page will be updated when the direct download is available.

This Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.4) update itself includes one bug fix, which addresses a problem with crashes and other problems on Mac computers with ATI cards. Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 does not have this problem.

Since updates are cumulative, installing the CS5 (5.0.4) update will also give you the many, many fixes and improvements in the CS5 (5.0.3) and CS5 (5.0.2) updates. Of course, you can also get these improvements and many more by upgrading to Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Adobe Premiere Pro forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.

We have also been working with several providers of plug-ins, codecs, and hardware devices to assist them in updating their software to fix some errors and crashes. Please take this opportunity to download and install updated codecs, plug-ins, and drivers from these providers, as relevant to your work.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 improvements in Final Cut Pro XML interchange

We made a lot of improvements in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 in the import and export of Final Cut Pro XML project files. Some of these improvements are new features, whereas some are bug fixes—and some can be either depending on how you look at them.

Here are the notable improvements, though not a complete list of bug fixes.

  • When Premiere Pro finds a reference to a ProRes proxy for RED (R3D) footage in an FCP file, it uses the full-resolution RED footage in instead of the ProRes proxy. If the resolution of a RED proxy clip doesn’t match the original RED media (e.g., a 2K proxy for a 4K original), Premiere Pro scales the clip in the Motion effect to maintain the same dimensions in Premiere Pro that were used in FCP.
  • Swapped the title for imported RED media to use the .R3D file name instead of the name of the .mov proxy used by FCP.
  • Fixed handling of audio in RED files.
  • Final Cut XML files generated by iMovie are now imported by Premiere Pro.
  • Fixed various bugs regarding importing and exporting of stereo and 5.1 audio.
  • Audio levels are now translated correctly. On export, Premiere Pro converts Volume to FCP Audio Levels, and converts Gain to FCP Gain—instead of the other way around, as was done in Premiere Pro CS5. (Audition export continues to use the old behavior.)
  • XDCAM HD clips with two channels of audio are now imported correctly instead of being incorrectly flagged as having four channels of audio (which caused crashes on playback).
  • Duplicate master clips are no longer created incorrectly in various cases.
  • Fixed instances of “generic error” failures caused by a mix of clips with and without masterclipid attributes.
  • XDCAM 1440 material is now imported with the correct pixel aspect ratio.
  • Premiere Pro now generates multiclip names the same way that FCP does (e.g., “My Clip[1]-Multiclip 2″) instead of the original, simpler implementation (“Multiclip 2″).
  • Set default sequence presets for sequences that use the Apple IMX codec or Apple DVCPROHD 1080p30 as their renderer in FCP.
  • Fixed bugs that led to incorrect interpretation of pixel aspect ratios.
  • Premiere Pro now sets the correct media In and Out points for clips that have speed changes applied in FCP.
  • Translation between Three-Way Color Corrector effects is improved, including adding the translation between these effects on export.
  • Fixed bugs in export of In and Out points for clips in Project panel.
  • Alpha channel values are now exported, instead of all assets being labeled as having no alpha channel.
  • A codec block is now added to each exported sequence, setting it to use ProRes 422 as the sequence render codec. This allows most formats to play without rendering in FCP. Previously, Premiere Pro didn’t specify a codec, so FCP defaulted to NTSC DV for all timelines.
  • Premiere Pro now adds FCP distort and scale parameters when the pixel aspect ratio (PAR) of a clip doesn’t match the PAR of the sequence its in. Premiere Pro handles this scaling implicitly, but FCP does it explicitly via these filters.

For a complete list of new and changed features in Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

For resources to assist with the transition from Final Cut Pro to Adobe Premiere Pro, see this page:
“Premiere Pro overview documents for Final Cut Pro and Avid Media Composer users”

Issue with Adobe Encore CS5.1 and Matrox MAX H.264 encoding on Windows

[Update: This issue is fixed in Adobe Encore CS6.]

If you have a Matrox MXO2 product with Matrox MAX technology or a Matrox CompressHD card, be aware that using a Matrox .264 file with Adobe Encore 5.1 (the version that is included with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5) on Windows can cause Encore to become unresponsive. This issue affects mostly large Matrox .264 files (~3GB or larger), and it also occurs when you transcode directly to Matrox MAX H.264 format in Encore CS5.1.

For Adobe Encore CS5.1, Matrox suggests that you do one of the following:

  • If you presently have Adobe CS5 software and want to upgrade to Adobe CS5.5 software, uninstall your Matrox Mtx.utils software and upgrade to Adobe CS5.5 software, and keep your CS5 version of Adobe Encore. (I.e., you can keep Encore CS5.0 and also install Encore CS5.1 on your computer.) When you install Matrox Mtx.utils 5.5, the Matrox Player and presets will be installed for Encore CS5.1 only, but you’ll be able to use Encore CS5.0 with your Matrox .264 files.
  • If you have only Encore CS5.1, don’t use any Matrox .264 files larger than 3GB or transcode assets longer than about 10 minutes to Matrox MAX H.264 format. For example, if you have a long Premiere Pro sequence that you want to export to a Matrox .264 file, break your export into multiple files no greater than 3GB and place these on the timeline in Encore CS5.1.

Final Cut Pro 7 keyboard shortcuts for Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 for Windows

Here is a link to the file that contains the Final Cut Pro 7 keyboard shortcut set for Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 for Windows.

This file was mistakenly left out of the Premiere Pro CS5 installer for Windows, so people who tried to switch to this keyboard shortcut set were unable to do so.

Unzip the file and then install the .kys file by copying it here:
C:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Premiere Pro CS5\Keyboard Shortcuts\en_US

(where C may be replaced by the a different drive name if you installed somewhere other than the C drive, and en_US may be replaced by another locale ID)

This file was included in the Premiere Pro CS5.5 installer, so manually installing this file is only necessary for Premiere Pro CS5 for Windows.

For information about keyboard shortcuts, including how to customize them, see this page:
“Keyboard shortcuts”

obscuring a face with the Track Matte Key effect

Colin Smith provides a video tutorial on Adobe TV that shows how to obscure a face using the Mosaic effect and the Track Matte Key effect in Adobe Premiere Pro.

He also shows a rough and manual way to do this in After Effects in this video. For a more automated and precise way to accomplish this in After Effects, see this video.

Video2Brain video series about Premiere Pro CS5.5 new and changed features

I recently recorded a set of video tutorials about all (yes, all) of the new and changed features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5.

The series is available for free on the Video2Brain website.

For details of the new and changed features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5—including links to these videos and others, as well as the relevant Help documents—see this page and the specific pages that it points to.

Once you’ve watched these videos, you’ll know the differences between Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 and Premiere Pro CS5.5, so you’ll be able to make the relatively small number of adjustments necessary when using resources created for Premiere Pro CS5, such as these.

RED (R3D) digital cinema and Canon XF improvements in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 includes several additions and improvements to source settings for RED Digital Cinema (R3D) files, including new color science support (REDcolor2, REDgamma2, REDlogFilm, etc.) and better curves and levels UI.

See this video on the Video2Brain website for a summary of these new and changed features for RED (R3D) footage, as well as improvements made in the Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.2) update.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 also includes enhanced native Canon XF support, including preview in the Media Browser and use of metadata.

For details of all of the new and changed features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

Adobe has also released a preview version of advanced RED importer software that adds support for RED EPIC footage, as well as the following new features:

  • ability to rotate and flip footage based on the camera orientation flag in R3D metadata
  • support for Echo port in R3D Source Settings dialog box, so that the RED preview can be sent out to an external monitor
  • increased size of RED R3D Source Settings dialog on larger monitors
  • HDR track selection and HDR blend support

editing efficiencies and user interface improvements in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 includes many small changes to the user interface and terminology that make common editing features easier to use and find.

See this video on the Video2Brain website for a demonstration of these new and changed features:

  • Added ways to create a new sequence matching the characteristics of a clip: File > New > Sequence From Clip menu command and New Sequence From Clip context-menu command (i.e., command available when Control-clicking or right-clicking).
  • Added Sequence > Match Frame menu command.
  • Added overlay in Program panel that enables dragging of clips from the Media Browser, Project panel, or Source panel into the Program panel to perform an insert or overwrite edit
  • The Unlink command now decouples the audio portion of a clip while automatically deselecting the video portion. The Unlink command now works on multiple clips at the same time, as well.
  • Added ability to add keyframes directly into the timeline using the Pen tool or Selection tool without having to first enable keyframing.
  • Added ability to set keyframes without a modifier key.
  • Added menu command Sequence > Trim Edit to open the Trim Monitor.
  • Renamed General tab of New Sequence dialog box to Settings.
  • Renamed Desktop editing mode in the New Sequence dialog box to Custom.
  • Changed Overlay to Overwrite.
  • Changed CTI to Playhead in some places.
  • Changed Razor Tracks to Add Edit and Razor All Tracks to Add Edit To All Tracks.

For details of all of the new and changed features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

improved keyboard shortcut customization in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 includes several welcome changes regarding keyboard shortcuts.

See this video on the Video2Brain website for a demonstration of these new and changed features:

For details of all of the new and changed features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

You do not need new versions of plug-ins for Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5

I’ve seen a significant amount of confusion about this, so I thought that it would be good to make this explicit statement:

You do not need new versions of plug-ins for Premiere Pro CS5.5. Plug-ins that work with Premiere Pro CS5 should work with Premiere Pro CS5.5.

I think that some of this confusion came from the need to get new versions of plug-ins when we advanced from Premiere Pro CS4 to Premiere Pro CS5. That was necessary because of the move from a 32-bit application to a 64-bit application. There is no such fundamental infrastructure change from Premiere Pro CS5 to Premiere Pro CS5.5.

You do need to make sure that the plug-ins are installed where Premiere Pro CS5.5 is looking for them. Premiere Pro CS5.5 has its own plug-ins folder, and it doesn’t look in the CS5 plug-ins folder, unless you tell it to do so (more on that in a bit). So, be sure to install the plug-ins in the right place.

By default, the plug-ins folder is in the following location:

  • (Windows) Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5\Support Files\Plug-ins
  • (Mac OS) Applications/Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5/Plug-ins

Premiere Pro also loads plug-ins from a MediaCore folder, which is intended to hold plug-ins shared between After Effects and Premiere Pro. Some third-party plug-in installers install their plug-ins in this folder. You should follow the instructions for these third-party plug-ins regarding how to install plug-ins for Premiere Pro CS5.5.

Here are links to the sites of some third-party plug-in providers, where they give instructions:

Tip: You can have an alias/shortcut in your CS5.5 plug-ins folder that points to the CS5 plug-ins folder. That way, when Premiere Pro is scanning the CS5.5 plug-ins folder for plug-ins to load, it’ll follow that alias/shortcut to the CS5 plug-ins folder and load plug-ins from there. Be careful if you decide to go this route, since it’s easy to point to duplicate versions this way. I keep my third-party plug-ins that are not installed with Premiere Pro in a separate “after-market” folder in my CS5 Plug-ins folder, and my alias/shortcut in my CS5.5 Plug-ins folder just points to that.

Michele Yamazaki show how to do it here.

Here are instructions for making an alias on Mac OS.

I didn’t find concise instructions for creating a shortcut to a directory on Windows, but the gist is this: Right-click a directory, and choose Copy; in the destination location, right-click, and choose Paste Shortcut.

All of this applies to After Effects, as well.

problems with Nvidia drivers 270.61 and 270.71


UPDATE: The version 270.73 driver is available now.


Nvidia and Adobe are aware of a problem with the 270.61 and 270.71 drivers for Nvidia graphics cards for Premiere Pro CS5 and Premiere Pro CS5.5.

A driver with a fix for this issue (270.73) should be available soon.

If you are experiencing problems with Premiere Pro, and you are using the 270.61 or 270.71 Nvidia drivers, please check the Nvidia driver download site for the new driver. You may also choose to roll back to a previous driver until the new driver is available.

We’ll update this post as soon as we learn of the public availability of the new driver.

merged clips and dual-system sound in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5

When you record audio from a device other than your camera, you often want to be able to synchronize the externally recorded audio with the video and manipulate this audio together with the video as if it were a single asset. With the Merge Clips command in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, you can do exactly that. You can use markers, In points, Out points, or timecode of clips from separate devices to synchronize them as part of the merge process or before merging.

This way of working with audio is often referred to as dual-system sound, and it’s especially common when recording video with HDSLR cameras and other devices that don’t typically include high-quality audio input hardware.

To see how to merge clips and synchronize audio and video tracks, see this video on the Video2Brain website and this video on the EventDV website.

In this video, Jason Levine shows how to use the Merge Clips command, as well as demonstrating a few other improvements in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5.

For complete details of what’s new and changed in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 integration with Audition CS5.5

Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Master Collection and Production Premium editions include Adobe Audition CS5.5, which is a much more powerful audio editing application than was Adobe Soundbooth, included in previous versions.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 includes an Edit In Adobe Audition command, which you can use to send individual clips, entire sequences, or just the selected work area—complete with reference video—directly to Adobe Audition for audio editing and sweetening. If you send an individual clip, Audition uses a render-and-replace process to automatically update the audio clip in Adobe Premiere Pro. If you send a sequence, you can choose to place the rendered audio in the audio track of your choice.

See this video on the Video2Brain website for a demonstration and explanation of this feature.

This video from Jason Levine also gives an overview of this feature.

For more information about using Audition with Adobe Premiere Pro, see “Working with video applications” in the Audition CS5.5 Help document and “Editing audio in Adobe Audition” in the Adobe Premiere Pro Help document.

For complete details of what’s new and changed in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

closed captions in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 adds the ability to attach a closed captioning data file to a sequence and preview the closed captions in the Program Monitor panel or on an external video monitor.

To preview the closed captions on an external video monitor, closed caption display must be enabled for the monitor. To preview the closed captions in the Program Monitor panel in Premiere Pro, choose Closed Captioning Display > Enable in the Program Monitor panel’s panel menu (the little icon in the upper-right corner of the panel).

This video by Karl Soule on Adobe TV and this video on the Video2Brain website show how to attach, preview, and export closed captions.

Premiere Pro can send closed captions to a DV monitor without any additional plug-ins. To send closed captions to other devices, you must use a third-party device and plug-in to read the closed caption data associated with a sequence and write that data into the video frames on output. Third-party hardware partners are adding support to send closed captioning data to their hardware output. At the time of this writing, MOTU and BlackMagic Design have already announced products to perform this task.

The closed captioning data that Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 can attach to a sequence can be in either .mcc files for CEA-708 data (for high-definition TV) or .scc files for CEA-608 data (for standard-definition TV). For information on closed captioning formats, see the “Closed captioning” page on Wikipedia.

Adobe Premiere Pro does not create closed caption data.

Additional information about the closed caption features of Premiere Pro CS5.5 is provided and discussed in this thread on the Premiere Pro user-to-user forum.

For details on all that’s new and changed in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

full-featured trial version for Adobe Premiere Pro

You can download the free, 30-day trial version of Premiere Pro here.

The trial version of Premiere Pro CS5 and earlier had a major shortcoming: It lacked many of the most useful and popular codecs, including codecs for MPEG-2, AVCHD, and RED media. This meant that people had a hard time evaluating the software for real-world use.

Not any longer.

The trial version of the current version of Premiere Pro includes all of the codecs that are included with the full version of Premiere Pro. This means that you can import and export to all of the supported file formats using the trial version.

See this page for more details about the trial version.

For lists of formats that you can import into and export from Adobe Premiere Pro, see these pages:

unified audio effects in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5

(For a video demonstrating these changes, see this page on the Video2Brain website.)

A lot of the changes that we made for Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 were to remove inconveniences, sources of confusion, and clutter. One small but very welcome change is the unification of the audio effects.

Previously, each audio effect had three instances—one each for mono, stereo, and 5.1 audio tracks. This was a nuisance.

In Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, each audio effects just has one instance. This makes applying the effects simpler, and it cleans up the structure of the Audio Effects folder. When you apply an audio effect, Adobe Premiere Pro automatically applies the effect of the correct type, corresponding to the item that you applied it to.

Some effects have restrictions, and can be used only on certain track types. See “Audio effects” for details.

For a complete list of what’s new and changed in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 improvements in CUDA processing and the Mercury Playback Engine

Before you read this post about what’s new and changed regarding CUDA processing in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, I recommend that you read this post about what CUDA is and what the Mercury Playback Engine is for Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.

OK, so now that you’ve gone and read about CUDA processing in Premiere Pro CS5, let’s move onto what’s new in Premiere Pro CS5.5.

(For a video overview of this information, see this video on the Video2Brain website.)

We have a few more effects and transitions that are accelerated by CUDA:

  • Film Dissolve
  • Additive Dissolve
  • Invert
  • Directional Blur
  • Fast Blur

The Film Dissolve transition is new in Premiere Pro CS5.5. It’s a dissolve transition that blends in a linear color space (gamma = 1.0). In simple terms, that means that it blends in a more realistic way; basically, dissolves look the way that they should. That’s not a CUDA-specific thing; I just thought that I’d call it out since this is the first time that I’ve had a chance to describe the effect.

One category of accelerated processes is very important but not really obvious in the user interface, as the accelerated effects are. I’m talking about various aspects of media preparation and footage interpretation. There’s a lot of processing that goes on behind the scenes when you’re bringing media of various types, sizes, frame rates, pixel aspect ratios, and so on into a sequence. Premiere Pro CS5.5 accelerates many more of these kinds of processes than did Premiere Pro CS5.

Premiere Pro CS5.5 accelerates processing for dealing with the following kinds of characteristics of mismatched media:

  • frame rate differences
  • field order differences
  • pixel aspect ratio differences
  • frame size differences
  • media with different alpha channel representations

Related to the above, frame blending and speed changes (including time remapping) are accelerated.

Similarly, processing of footage interpretation is accelerated for changes in frame rate, pixel aspect ratio, field order, and alpha channel interpretation, as well as pulldown removal. Interlacing and deinterlacing are also accelerated.

Premiere Pro CS5 was unable to use more than 4GB of RAM on the GPU (VRAM). Premiere Pro CS5.5 can use more than 4GB of VRAM.

We’ve added many graphics cards to the list of cards that provide the CUDA processing features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5. Below is a list of the cards added in this version. For a complete list, not just the list of changes in this version, see this page.

  • GeForce GTX 570
  • GeForce GTX 580
  • Quadro FX 3700M
  • Quadro FX 3800M
  • Quadro 2000
  • Quadro 2000D
  • Quadro 2000M
  • Quadro 3000M
  • Quadro 4000M
  • Quadro 5010M
  • Quadro 6000

You’ll notice that there are a lot more cards for laptops now. (They’re denoted by the M at the end of the card number.)

For more about what’s new and changed in Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 integration with Adobe Story

Adobe Story is an application for writing scripts (as in screenplays, not as in computer programming) that integrates with applications in Creative Suite. In Creative Suite 5, you had to use OnLocation as an intermediary to get script information from Adobe Story to Adobe Premiere Pro. Now, with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, you can go straight from Adobe Story into Adobe Premiere Pro.

This video on the Video2Brain website shows how to use a script from Adobe Story to improve speech analysis and then use the text metadata to edit video according to dialog in Premiere Pro. This video from Jason Levine gives an overview of the workflow.

One of the great benefits to bringing script information into Adobe Premiere Pro is that the script can be used to inform and improve the analysis of speech in a movie. When you use the speech-analysis feature, words in the audio track are converted into text metadata that you can use during editing. For example, you can navigate in a sequence to the exact time when a word is spoken by clicking the word in the Metadata panel.

For more information on Adobe Story, see the Adobe Story documentation. You can also follow and communicate with Adobe Story team on Facebook, forums, and Twitter.

For more of what’s new and changed in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5: What’s new and changed

Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5 is available. Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5 is included with such applications as After Effects CS5.5 and Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, which you can order now.

To see a video demonstration and explanation of the changes in Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5, see this video on the Video2Brain website.

If you want to ask questions about these new and changed features, come on over to the Adobe Media Encoder user-to-user forum. That’s the best place for questions. Questions left in comments on a blog post are much harder to work with; the blog comment system just isn’t set up for conversations. It’s also never too early to leave comments on the pages of the Help documents to ask for more information, point out areas that aren’t clear, and so on; Kevin, the guy who writes the Help documents, wants your input. You can also leave comments on the pages of the Help document to tell everyone about tutorials and other resources that you’ve found (or created) about these new features.


top new features and changes in Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5, with links to more information


Listing every change to the Adobe Media Encoder user interface here would be a daunting task, since so much work went into cleaning up, rearranging, and otherwise improving the interface for Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5. So, here are the top new features and changes, as well as a few that have made my life easier already.

  • Added encoding presets for iPad devices and other tablet devices.
  • Improved encoding presets for YouTube, Vimeo, and other popular output formats.
  • You can now import image sequences into Adobe Media Encoder.
  • Watch folder features are much improved, including ability to add the same watch folder to the encoding queue multiple times and assign multiple sets of encoding settings for multiple output types from the same source. Adding a watch folder is now as easy as dragging a folder into the Watch Folders pane.
  • The Start Queue Automatically When Idle For preference is off by default. (Yay!)
  • A new checkbox, Auto-Encode Watch Folders, gives you the ability to decide whether items in a watch folder are automatically encoded as soon as they appear, as opposed to waiting until the encoding queue is started.
  • Added context menus to many items, so that common commands are available by right-clicking (Windows) or Control-clicking (Mac OS) many items. An especially handy pair of such menu items are Reveal Source File and Reveal Output File, which show the location of the respective file in the Finder or Windows Explorer.
  • Added ability to drag a sequence from the Adobe Premiere Pro Project panel or a composition from the After Effects Project panel into Adobe Media Encoder to add it to the encoding queue. You can also begin the process of importing by double-clicking in an empty area of the encoding queue pane.
  • RED (R3D) source settings can be accessed using File > Source Settings, with improved RED support like that in After Effects CS5.5 and Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, including new color science support (REDcolor2, REDgamma2, REDlogFilm, etc.) and better curves and levels UI.
  • A chime sounds when the encoding queue is done processing, like in After Effects.
  • The trial versions of Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and After Effects CS5.5 include all codecs included with the full versions, so users of the trial version will be able to import any file that can be imported using in the full version, as well as being able to encode using any codec that can be used in the full version. Because Adobe Media Encoder receives its codecs from the client applications, this change expands the functionality of the Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5 trial version, too.

For a couple of early videos showing improvements to Adobe Media Encoder, see “Sneak preview of Adobe Media Encoder improvements to importing” and “Sneak preview of Adobe Media Encoder improvements to encoding”. (Please excuse the low audio levels in these videos. I was in a hurry to post these videos, and I neglected the all-important step of checking and normalizing my audio levels. Learn from my mistake.)

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5: What’s new and changed

(See this page for what’s new and changed in Premiere Pro CS6.)

Video2Brain provides a detailed set of videos about all of the new and changed features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5.

If you want to ask questions about these new and changed features, come on over to the Adobe Premiere Pro user-to-user forum. That’s the best place for questions. Questions left in comments on a blog post are much harder to work with; the blog comment system just isn’t set up for conversations.


top new features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, with links to more information


  • merged clips for synchronizing audio and video tracks in dual-system sound workflow, in which audio is recorded separate from video (common for HDSLR work)
  • Mercury Playback Engine performance improvements, including additional effects and tasks processed with CUDA and an expansion of the set of graphics cards that provide the CUDA-processing features
  • added ability to edit audio with Adobe Audition CS5.5, interchanging a single clip or an entire sequence
  • audio effects unified, such that you no longer need to apply a different effect depending on whether the audio track is mono, stereo, or 5.1 audio
  • improved speech analysis with scripts from Adobe Story
  • ability to attach a closed captioning data file to a sequence and preview the closed captions in the Program panel
  • new overlay that enables dragging of clips from the Media Browser, Project panel, or Source panel into the Program panel to perform an insert or overwrite edit
  • improved keyboard shortcut customization, including addition of a search field to the keyboard shortcuts dialog box
  • improved RED (R3D) features, including new color science support (REDcolor2, REDgamma2, REDlogFilm, etc.) and better curves and levels UI
  • enhanced native Canon XF support, including preview in the Media Browser and use of metadata
  • several user interface improvements that add up to a much more efficient user experience, including the following:
    • The Unlink command now decouples the audio portion of a clip while automatically deselecting the audio portion. The Unlink command now works on multiple clips at the same time, as well.
    • ability to add keyframes directly into the timeline using the Pen tool or Selection tool without having to first enable keyframing
    • ability to set keyframes without a modifier key

other new and changed features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, with links to more information


Here’s a virtually comprehensive list of changes beyond the top few listed above (though not quite listing every minor tweak to the user interface).

projects and sequences

  • Added Sequence > Match Frame menu command.
  • Renamed General tab of New Sequence dialog box to Settings.
  • Renamed Desktop editing mode in the New Sequence dialog box to Custom.
  • Added ways to create a new sequence matching the characteristics of a clip: File > New > Sequence From Clip menu command and New Sequence From Clip context-menu command (i.e., command available when Control-clicking or right-clicking).

importing and managing footage

  • The trial version of Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 includes all codecs included with the full version, so users of the trial version will be able to import any file that can be imported using in the full version.
  • You can drag and drop assets from iTunes into the Premiere Pro Project panel.

editing

effects and compositing

rendering and exporting

  • Added ability to drag a sequence from the Adobe Premiere Pro Project panel into Adobe Media Encoder to add it to the encoding queue. For other Adobe Media Encoder changes, see “Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5: What’s new and changed”.
  • The trial version of Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 includes all codecs included with the full version, so users of the trial version will be able to render and export using any codec that can be used in the full version.

keyboard shortcuts

  • Added command for maximizing panels: Press the Shift+grave accent key (`) or choose Window > Maximize Frame to maximize the active (selected) panel. This is in addition to the keyboard shortcut (`) in previous versions that maximizes the panel under the mouse pointer, regardless of which panel is active (selected).

Adobe Creative Suite 5 Production Premium tips and tricks

We have recently published (with the help of Richard Harrington) a new collection of Adobe Creative Suite 5 Production Premium tips and tricks. This document was created to support DSLR workflows with Creative Suite Production Premium, but there are tips in here that are of use to just about everyone.

The document is full of tips for Adobe Premiere Pro, Photoshop, Bridge, Adobe Media Encoder, and After Effects, as well as several more about selecting gear, shooting footage, and recording audio. It’s clear that Richard and the other folks who worked on this collection of tips have lots of experience using their tools and have learned the best and most efficient ways to accomplish many things.

free chapters from Karen Pearlman’s Cutting Rhythms

I was listening to an interview with Karen Pearlman on the Art of the Guillotine podcast, and Gordon (the host) mentioned that there were a couple of sample chapters from Karen’s book Cutting Rhythms: Shaping the Film Edit on the site. Based on what I was hearing in the interview, I knew that I definitely wanted to read those chapters. I’m glad that I did.

Pearlman is a film and video editor whose early career was in dance, and she brings her ideas and experience about choreography, rhythm, and the direct connection between body and emotion into her editing.

She has many useful and interesting suggestions regarding how the editor can synchronize with the material and find the rhythms inherent in it, as well as how to create specific responses in an audience by manipulating their natural tendencies to synchronize with certain things occurring on screen. Her ideas of timing, pacing, rhythm, and trajectory don’t come from theory as much as they come from years of practice in a closely related and very physical and musical art form.

Learning Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 by Phil Hawkins

Infinite Skills has provided some free sample videos from the Learning Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 training series by Phil Hawkins.

Phil has a casual, easy-going, conversational manner to his video training, and he makes learning new technical skills a pleasant experience—perhaps in part because of his great voice. (This is a characteristic that he shares with my partner Angie Taylor.)

These are very basic videos, but that’s no criticism—people need to learn the basics before moving on to more advanced subjects.

Here are links to free sample videos from this series and pages for additional information on the same topics:

Really, my only criticism about this series is that some of the surrounding collateral—such as the box cover and bumper video that plays at the beginning of the series—are a bit sloppy, even getting product names wrong. For example, the box refers to Premiere CS5, not Premiere Pro CS5.

How to communicate with the Adobe Story team (bug reports, feature requests, questions, and so on)

We’ve been seeing a few questions and requests about Adobe Story lately, and I thought that it would be a good idea to let everyone know the best ways to communicate with the Adobe Story team.

The Adobe Story user-to-user forum is great for asking questions about how to use the software and report issues. Many members of the Adobe Story team help out on that forum, as well as several experienced users of the software. Before posting a question, first do a search to see if your question has been answered before.

For now, the Adobe Story user-to-user forum is also the best place to tell the Adobe Story team about feature requests and bugs.

To keep up with the latest Adobe Story developments, follow the Adobe Story Facebook page and Twitter feed.

Of course, basic information about using Adobe Story can be found in the Adobe Story Help document.

The Best of Premiere Pro: video training by Eran Stern

Eran Stern’s new video training collection, The Best of Premiere Pro, is a very good video training series for someone who has already learned the basics of Adobe Premiere Pro and wants to learn some practical tips, shortcuts, workflows, and advanced techniques.

This series is a welcome deviation from many of the tutorials and training packages that I’ve seen. Rather than attempt to cover the same ground covered by several other video training series that cover (or attempt to cover) every feature and UI control, Eran has chosen to focus on a few things that have been left relatively untouched by other offerings. Even in the case where he does cover subjects covered in other video training series, he does so in greater depth or with more attention to workflow gotchas—as in the nearly two hours that he spends on one end-to-end project using Dynamic Link in various ways.

Eran put real testing into the research for this video series, and this testing pays off with information that you can’t find anywhere else. For example, he shares a list of Cycore (CC) effects installed with After Effects that can also be used in Premiere Pro. Similarly, he shares his experience with a large number of other third-party effects and makes recommendations for their use.

Eran has made a few of the videos from this series freely available to whet your appetite, and you can find these free videos toward the bottom of the main The Best of Premiere Pro product page.

I think that the best of the free sample videos is the one about the use of transparent video clips. A higher-quality version of that video is also on Eran’s main tutorials page. Here’s a direct link to the transparent video tutorial.

This training video makes heavy use of stock footage from Art Beats, and you even get some Art Beats footage when you purchase the video training.

(Note: As you can see on Eran’s blog, there is a problem as of today with the Art Beats server; but I’m sure that they’ll get that cleared up soon.)

I only found one aspect of the entire video training series problematic, and that was the audio toward the beginning. I think that Eran must have changed his microphone setup after recording the first video, because I noticed rather distracting plosives in that video but not in the later ones.

CUDA, OpenCL, Mercury Playback Engine, and Adobe Premiere Pro

[UPDATE: For details of what was new regarding CUDA and OpenCL processing in Adobe Premiere Pro CS6, see this page. If you're using Premiere Pro CS6 and later, note that nearly everything said below about CUDA also applies to OpenCL.]

[UPDATE: For details of what was new regarding CUDA processing in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.]

A few weeks ago, I wrote a forum post to try to clarify some things about CUDA, the Mercury Playback Engine, and what it all means for Adobe Premiere Pro. I wrote this as a forum post because I wanted to invite questions and conversation. But, as forum threads do, it got a little messy, so I thought that I should consolidate the information here.

If you want to ask a question about this subject, please do so on the forum thread, not on this blog post. It’s very difficult to have a conversation in the comments of a blog post.


What is the Mercury Playback Engine, and what are CUDA and OpenCL?

Mercury Playback Engine is a name for a large number of performance improvements in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 and later. Those improvements include the following:

  • 64-bit application
  • multithreaded application
  • processing of some things using CUDA (and OpenCL in Premiere Pro CS6)

Everyone who has Premiere Pro CS5 or later has the first two of these. Only the third one depends on having a specific graphics card.

CUDA is a technology (architecture, programming language, etc.) for a certain kind of GPU processing. CUDA is an Nvidia technology, so only Nvidia cards provide it. OpenCL is a technology that is similar in purpose to CUDA. OpenCL features are provided by many graphics cards, including ATI/AMD cards.

Confusingly—because of one of our own early videos that was unclear—a lot of people think that Mercury just refers to CUDA/OpenCL processing. This is wrong. To see that this was not the original intent, you need look no further than the project settings UI strings Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration and Mercury Playback Engine Software Only, which would make no sense if Mercury meant “hardware” (i.e., CUDA/OpenCL).


What is required for Premiere Pro to use CUDA/OpenCL processing?

The official and up-to-date list of the cards that provide the CUDA/OpenCL processing features is here:
Adobe Premiere Pro system requirements

Some of the cards on that list are only enabled if you have the recent updates. Go here to read about the most recent updates for your version.

If you don’t have one of these cards, you can still use Premiere Pro; you just won’t get the advantages of processing with CUDA/OpenCL.

On Mac OS, OpenCL processing features of Premiere Pro CS6 require Mac OSX v10.7 or later.

Dennis Radeke gives the results of side-by-side tests with various Quadro cards in an article on his blog.


What does Premiere Pro accelerate with CUDA/OpenCL?

Here’s a list of things that Premiere Pro CS5 and later can process with CUDA:

  • some effects (complete list at the bottom of this post)
  • scaling (details here)
  • deinterlacing
  • blending modes
  • color space conversions

Premiere Pro CS5.5 and later can process even more things, listed on this page.

Premiere Pro CS6 can use OpenCL to process the same features, with the exception of four effects: Basic 3D, Gaussian Blur, Fast Blur, and Directional Blur.

It’s worth mentioning one set of things that Premiere Pro doesn’t process using CUDA/OpenCL: encoding and decoding.

A common misconception is that CUDA/OpenCL processing is only used for rendering for previews. That is not true. CUDA/OpenCL processing can be used for rendering for final output, too. See this page for details about what rendering is.

Whether a segment of a sequence gets a red or yellow render bar is influenced by whether the project is set to use CUDA/OpenCL processing (i.e, whether the project’s Renderer setting is Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration or Mercury Playback Engine Software Only). See this page for details.

Note that whether a frame can be processed by CUDA/OpenCL depends on the size of the frame and the amount of RAM on the graphics card (VRAM). This article gives details about that, toward the bottom.

Processing with CUDA/OpenCL doesn’t just mean that things are faster. In some cases, it can actually mean that results are better, as with scaling. See this article for details.

For export, scaling with CUDA/OpenCL is always at maximum quality, regardless of quality settings. (This only applies to scaling done on the GPU.) Maximum Render Quality can still make a difference with GPU-accelerated exports for any parts of the render that are processed on the CPU. Over time, we are working on reducing the list of exceptions to what can be processed on the GPU. For an example of a limitation that can cause some rendering to fall back to the CPU, see this article: “Maximum dimensions in Premiere Pro CS5″.

When rendering is done on the CPU with Maximum Render Quality enabled, processing is done in a linear color space (i.e., gamma = 1.0) at 32 bits per channel (bpc), which results in more realistic results, finer gradations in color, and better results for midtones. GPU-accelerated processing is always performed in a 32-bpc linear color space. To have results match between CPU rendering and GPU rendering, enable Maximum Render Quality.

Note: There are two places to enable or disable Maxium Render Quality—in the sequence settings and in the export settings. The sequence setting only applies to preview renders; the export setting (which defaults to the sequence setting) overrides the sequence setting.


Why are only some video cards supported?

There’s a lot of testing work that goes into making sure that a given card works without problems and actually provides the features in a way that we can support. We don’t want to say that people can use any card and then have some cards cause problems. We learned this the hard way on the After Effects side, where a lot of problems arise from people trying to use the OpenGL features with cards that we haven’t been able to test against and verify.

If there’s a specific card that you want us to add to the list of cards that Premiere Pro can use for CUDA/OpenCL processing, then let us know with a feature request.


What about OpenCL?

As we were beginning the work for Premiere Pro CS5, OpenCL wasn’t far enough along for us to use it for the Mercury Playback Engine.

Premiere Pro CS6 added the ability to process many features with OpenCL. See this page for details.


What about OpenGL?

OpenGL is a different technology that is implemented through GPUs. It is not exclusive of CUDA/OpenCL; it’s a different thing altogether, and a card that uses CUDA/OpenCL will also use OpenGL for some things. OpenGL is used to do such things as render 3D and accelerate drawing of items to the screen. After Effects uses it some. Premiere Pro, not so much.


What about Mercury in After Effects?

The term Mercury Playback Engine refers to Premiere Pro. It has nothing to do with After Effects. After Effects CS5 and later is a 64-bit application, and it has been multithreaded for a long time, so those improvements are there. Only the ray-traced 3D renderer in After Effects CS6 uses CUDA (as do a few third-party plug-ins).


How can I make Premiere Pro faster?

This page is a good place to start.


What effects are GPU-accelerated in Premiere Pro?

To show in the Effects panel only effects that can be accelerated by CUDA/OpenCL, click the Accelerated Effects icon at the top of the Effects panel.

Here’s a list of the effects and transitions that can be accelerated by CUDA in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.3):

  • Alpha Adjust
  • Basic 3D
  • Black & White
  • Brightness & Contrast
  • Color Balance (RGB)
  • Color Pass
  • Color Replace
  • Crop
  • Drop Shadow
  • Extract
  • Fast Color Corrector
  • Feather Edges
  • Gamma Correction
  • Garbage Matte (4, 8, 16)
  • Gaussian Blur
  • Horizontal Flip
  • Levels
  • Luma Corrector
  • Luma Curve
  • Noise
  • Proc Amp
  • RGB Curves
  • RGB Color Corrector
  • Sharpen
  • Three-way Color Corrector
  • Timecode
  • Tint
  • Track Matte
  • Ultra Keyer
  • Video Limiter
  • Vertical Flip
  • Cross Dissolve
  • Dip to Black
  • Dip to White

For a list of additional GPU-accelerated effects in Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

Red, yellow, and green render bars and what they mean

[Thanks to Steve Hoeg, who helped with some of the details of this post.]

(For a video that briefly covers much of the material in this article, go here.)

If you’ve worked with Adobe Premiere Pro even a little bit, you’ve noticed that colored bars—red, yellow, and green—appear at the bottom of the time ruler at the top of the Timeline panel, above clips in a sequence. These colored bars are often referred to as render bars. But what do they mean, and what does this mean to your work?


a digression into rendering…


First, we need to understand what it means to render a preview.

In the context of computer graphics, rendering is the creation of an image from a set of inputs. For Premiere Pro, this essentially refers to the creation of the frames in a sequence from the decoded source media for the clips, any transformations or interpretations done to fit the source media into a sequence, and the effects applied to the clips.

For clips based on simple source media that match the sequence settings and have only simple effects applied, Premiere Pro can render the frames that make up the sequence in real time. In this case, each frame is rendered for display just before the CTI (current time indicator) reaches it. Premiere Pro caches these results so that it doesn’t unnecessarily redo work when you revisit a frame.

For more complex sets of effects and more difficult source media, Premiere Pro can’t always render the frames of the sequence as fast as needed to play them back in real time. To play these frames in real time, they need to be processed and saved ahead of time, so that they can be read back and played instead of being recalculated on the fly. The creation of these frames to be saved for rapid playback is what is meant by rendering a preview.

By the way, it’s common but confusing and misleading jargon to refer to rendering of previews as rendering all by itself. Rendering for display, rendering for final output, rendering for previews—these are all valid uses of the word rendering. Don’t fall into the trap of using this general term to refer only to the specific case of rendering for the purpose of creating preview files for real-time playback.

Note: Rendering of previews is only for preview purposes. Preview files will not be used for final output unless you have Use Previews option checked on output—which you should not use except in the case of rough previews. Using preview files for final output will in almost all cases cause a decrease in quality. It can speed things up in some cases, so it may be useful for creating a rough preview in less time.


OK, so now about those colored render bars…


With that preparatory definition out of the way, what do the colored bars mean?

  • green: This segment of the sequence has a rendered preview file associated with it. Playback will play using the rendered preview file. Playback at full quality is certain to be in real time.
  • yellow: This segment of the sequence does not have a rendered preview file associated with it. Playback will play by rendering each frame just before the CTI reaches it. Playback at full quality will probably be in real time (but it might not be).
  • red: This segment of the sequence does not have a rendered preview file associated with it. Playback will play by rendering each frame just before the CTI reaches it. Playback at full quality will probably not be in real time (but it might be).
  • none: This segment of the sequence does not have a rendered preview file associated with it, but the codec of the source media is simple enough that it can essentially be treated as its own preview file. Playback will play directly from the original source media file. Playback at full quality is certain to be in real time. This only occurs for a few codecs (including DV and DVCPRO).

Note the uses of the word probably above. The colors aren’t a promise. They’re a guess based on some rather simple criteria. If you have a fast computer, then a lot of things marked with red may play back in real time; if you have a slow computer, then some things marked with yellow may need to be rendered to preview files before the segment can be played in real time.


what causes a segment to get render bars of a certain color


What kinds of things contribute to a segment getting a certain color of render bar? The general answer is that changes that tend to make processing of a segment much slower will switch it from none to yellow or from yellow to red.

I’ve broken the examples below into separate lists for Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration and Mercury Playback Engine Software Only, which are the two possible settings for Renderer in the Video Rendering And Playback section of the project settings. (For details of CUDA acceleration and the Mercury Playback Engine, see this page for CS5 and this page for CS5.5.) Because Premiere Pro CS5 can use CUDA to accelerate scaling, deinterlacing, blending, and many effects, many things that cause a red render bar in software-only (CPU) mode only cause a yellow render bar in GPU acceleration mode. Even more things are accelerated by CUDA in Premiere Pro CS5.5.

Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration:

  • yellow: The source media’s codec is computationally difficult (such as AVCHD). As mentioned above, only very few simple codecs don’t get a yellow bar; these include DV and DVCPRO.
  • yellow: The settings of the clip (e.g., pixel aspect ratio, frame rate, field settings) don’t match the settings for the sequence.
  • yellow: A CUDA-accelerated video effect or transition has been applied to the clip. (A CUDA-accelerated video transition only causes a yellow bar over the duration of the transition.)
  • red: A non-CUDA-accelerated video effect or transition has been applied to the clip. (A non-CUDA-accelerated video transition only causes a red bar over the duration of the transition.)

Mercury Playback Engine Software Only:

  • yellow: The source media’s codec is computationally difficult (such as AVCHD). As mentioned above, only very few simple codecs don’t get a yellow bar; these include DV and DVCPRO.
  • red: The settings of the clip (e.g., pixel aspect ratio, frame rate, field settings) don’t match the settings for the sequence.
  • red: Any video effect or transition has been applied to the clip. (A video transition only causes a red bar over the duration of the transition.)

I hope that from this you will see that a yellow render bar doesn’t mean that something is wrong. It’s entirely normal for most modern codecs. And even a red render bar is to be expected with certain effects or when you are using media of various formats in a sequence. If you see a colored bar, don’t panic.


how the render bars relate to playback commands


One of the primary uses for the color bars is to give you the ability to render preview files more selectively.

  • When you press the spacebar, Premiere Pro plays the sequence without rendering any additional preview files first.
  • When you press the Enter key (or choose Sequence > Render Effects In Work Area), Premiere Pro renders preview files for all segments with red render bars before playing the sequence.
  • Unfortunately, there isn’t a default keyboard shortcut for the Render Entire Work Area command. The Render Entire Work Area command renders preview files for all segments with red or yellow bars before playing the sequence. I have customized my keyboard shortcuts to map this command to Shift+Enter.

a simple example


software-only
Above is a sequence in a project set to Mercury Playback Engine Software Only. The footage is 4K RED Cinema footage that matches the sequence settings. The first clip has a non-CUDA-accelerated effect applied. The second has a CUDA-accelerated effect applied. The third clip has no effect applied. The difficult nature of the footage causes it to be marked yellow for “probably will play in real time”. Any effect on these clips in software-only mode causes them to be marked with red render bars.

GPU
Switching the project setting to Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration causes the CUDA-accelerated effect to get a yellow render bar instead of the red render bar that it got in software-only mode. The non-CUDA-accelerated effect is still marked as red, though.

render effects GPU
I pressed Enter to just create a rendered preview file for the segment with the red render bar…

render entire work area
… and then pressed Shift+Enter to use my custom keyboard shortcut for Render Entire Work Area.

Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro from Video2Brain

Video2Brain has recently released a new training workshop aimed at folks just beginning with Premiere Pro, Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.

Maxim Jago did a great job (with Jan Ozer) creating the comprehensive Adobe Premiere Pro CS5: Learn By Video training DVD and book, as well as Premiere Pro CS5 for Avid Editors. It’s good to see him back with this series on the basics.

Here are a few free sample video tutorials from this workshop:

Video2Brain has been quite busy lately, putting out several DVDs and online training series about Adobe professional video applications. Other notable recent releases include After Effects CS5: Learn By Video and the free After Effects CS5: Frequently Asked Questions.

For additional, free getting-started resource for Premiere Pro, see “Getting started with Adobe Premiere Pro (CS4, CS5, and CS5.5)” and “Getting started and Help pages in several languages”.

optimizing for performance: Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects (webinar recording & links)

A few days ago, we hosted a one-hour session about optimizing for performance of both Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects. In case you missed it, here’s the recording.

We also said that we’d post a set of links for more information about all of the things that we covered. See this post for those details.

Dynamic Link in CS5: no longer a one-way street

One of the new features in the CS5 versions of Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects is really more of a bug fix, and so it seems to have escaped notice. Let me fix that.

In Creative Suite 4, Dynamic Link was a one-way street. If you used Dynamic Link to send information from, say, After Effects to Adobe Premiere Pro, you couldn’t later use Dynamic Link to send information from Adobe Premiere Pro to After Effects. You had to restart the applications to reset the direction and use Dynamic Link going the other direction.

In Creative Suite 5, that limitation is gone. This is a huge improvement. But most people didn’t notice, because we didn’t trumpet this in our lists of new features. The only way that you would’ve known is if you noticed that the note in the CS4 documentation about the limitation had vanished from the CS5 documentation.

There are still some somewhat obvious limits related to the fact that you can’t have a circular, recursive reference (e.g., composition A links to sequence B, which also links to composition A). These limitations are described in “About Dynamic Link”.

For a list of the ways that you can move things back and forth between After Effects and Adobe Premiere Pro, and links to more information, see this page:
“Working with Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects”

For a complete list of new and changed features in After Effects CS5, see “What’s new in After Effects CS5″.

For highlights of new and changed features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5, see “What’s new in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5″.

Oh, and while I have your attention: Be sure to update your software. Really. I spend most of every day helping people to get past problems with their software, and the great majority of problems are fixed by applying the available updates.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.3) update: performance improvements, bug fixes, and Quadro 5000M and 4000 CUDA support

Today, the Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.3) update was released.

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates for Premiere Pro CS5. Ideally, you should check for updates by choosing Help > Updates. But you can also directly download the update packages from the download pages for Windows or Mac OS, using the “Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 5.0.3 update” link. If you use the manual process, you must choose the correct patcher based on your original installation type.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Adobe Premiere Pro forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.

There are a lot of bug fixes and some changes in capabilities in this update. This article gives the the generally relevant information. You can read more details in the Adobe Premiere Pro 5.0.3 release notes. Also, note that this update includes all fixes and changes made in the Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.2) update.

You should also install the After Effects CS5 (10.0.1) update and Adobe Media Encoder CS5 (5.0.1) update (Windows or Mac OS) while you’re at it.


new and changed features

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.3) adds support for the following graphics cards to accelerate processing using CUDA technology on the GPU:

For a complete list of graphics cards for which the CUDA acceleration features are provided and supported, see the Premiere Pro system requirements page. For more information about CUDA acceleration of processing and the Mercury playback engine in general, see Premiere Pro Help.


bug fixes

Note that we were able to find and fix a lot of these problems because of the great feedback that we got when we asked people to use the crash reporter. Please keep doing so. And don’t hesitate to file bugs and send feature requests.

Here’s a partial list of bug fixes in this update:

  • Improved stability of capturing on Windows.
  • Improved performance for interactions with user interface for effects.
  • Improved performance of editing in long sequences containing transitions.
  • QuickTime movies containing video encoded with Animation or ProRes codecs caused long delays or hangs if the Cineform importer was installed. This is fixed.
  • Custom action-safe guides were shifting position during direct manipulation. This is fixed.
  • Double-clicking a title opened the Source Monitor panel instead of the Titler panel when the Project panel was in Icon view. This is fixed.
  • MXF files with 4:2:0 color subsampling created by a Nexio system can now be imported by the XDCAM HD importer.
  • Fixed issues regarding indexing of MPEG files, including unresponsive UI during indexing and some cases of unnecessary re-indexing of media shared across a network.
  • Dissolves were not behaving correctly when processed by CUDA when opacity keyframes were present. This is fixed.
  • The Crop effect was being rendered incorrectly when processed by CUDA when the clip was scaled to frame size. This is fixed.
  • Rendering of previews got stuck in a never-ending loop state under some circumstances. This is fixed.
  • Audio was not exported via SDI when exporting to tape. This is fixed.
  • Master clips imported into projects using Final Cut Pro XML import were stripped of their unique identifiers. This is fixed.

other software updates known to address problems with Premiere Pro

We have also been working with several providers of plug-ins, codecs, and hardware devices (such as Cineform and BlackMagic) to assist them in updating their software to fix some errors and crashes. Please take this opportunity to download and install updated codecs, plug-ins, and drivers from these providers, as relevant to your work.


known issues

  • Possible hang on start if firewall or other software (such as ZoneAlarm or FileMaker) blocks communication between Premiere Pro and related components. (See this Technical Support document for more information and solutions.)

Download speech analysis libraries for Premiere Pro

Premiere Pro provides the ability to analyze speech in a clip or file and convert the spoken words into text, which is stored as XMP metadata.

One aspect of this feature is the ability to choose a language for the speech to be analyzed: English, French, German, Italian, Korean, Japanese, or Spanish. Unfortunately, it’s not clear from within Premiere Pro that you need to download separate speech analysis models for each language in order to choose and use one of these additional languages.

So, here’s a link:
Download speech analysis models.

This page includes instructions for using the speech analysis feature, as well as links to several tutorials and examples showing how to make use of the XMP metadata created from the speech:
“Analyze speech for text XMP metadata”

some details about scaling in Premiere Pro CS5, CS5.5, CS6, and CC

A lot of people are talking about CUDA and OpenCL on the GPU in the context of Premiere Pro. But the talk is almost always about speed, speed, and more speed. Yeah, using CUDA or OpenCL on the GPU to process a lot of effects and such does speed things up (a lot!) in many cases, but that’s not the whole story.

Moving a lot of processing to the GPU can also make things better, not just faster.

A good example is scaling. There are lots of different scaling algorithms, and they each have their pros and cons. Some are better for scaling things up, some are better for scaling things down; some are better for sharp graphics, and some are better for gradual changes in color across an image. The real tradeoff, though, is that the high-quality algorithms are also—in general—the slow algorithms.

However, these higher-quality algorithms are only really slow if you are forced to execute them serially, but they are relatively fast when you can run them in parallel. One of the huge advantages of GPU processing is that GPUs are massively parallel, with hundreds of parallel processing units. There are a lot of pixel operations that are very amenable to parallel processing, since you don’t need to know the result of the operation on one pixel to do the same operation on its neighbor in the same image. Scaling is just such an operation. When you move scaling operations to the GPU, you get to take advantage of scaling algorithms that were just plain unfeasible on the CPU.

So, scaling using CUDA or OpenCL can be better. And faster. In some tests done here, scaling was more than 40 times faster on the GPU than on the CPU at maximum quality.

When Premiere Pro is just using the CPU for the processing of scaling operations, it uses the following scaling methods:

The variable-radius bicubic scaling done on the CPU is very similar to the standard bicubic mode in Photoshop, though the Premiere Pro version is multi-threaded and optimized with some SSE instructions. Even with these optimizations, it is still extremely slow. For high-quality scaling at faster-than-real-time processing, you need to use the GPU.

When Premiere Pro is using CUDA or OpenCL on the GPU to accelerate the processing of scaling operations, it uses the following scaling methods:

For export, scaling with CUDA or OpenCL is always at maximum quality, regardless of quality settings. (This only applies to scaling done on the GPU.) Maximum Render Quality can still make a difference with GPU-accelerated exports for any parts of the render that are processed on the CPU. Over time, we are working on reducing the list of exceptions to what can be processed on the GPU. For an example of a limitation that can cause some rendering to fall back to the CPU, see this article: “Maxium dimensions in Premiere Pro CS5″.

When rendering is done on the CPU with Maximum Render Quality enabled, processing is done in a linear color space (i.e., gamma = 1.0) at 32 bits per channel (bpc), which results in more realistic results, finer gradations in color, and better results for midtones. GPU-accelerated processing is always performed in a 32-bpc linear color space. To have results match between CPU rendering and GPU rendering, enable Maximum Render Quality.

Note: There are two places to enable or disable Maxium Render Quality—in the sequence settings and in the export settings. The sequence setting only applies to preview renders; the export setting (which defaults to the sequence setting) overrides the sequence setting.

One final note, as long as I have your attention:
I’ve noticed a lot of people—the vast majority, really—using the term ‘Mercury’ or ‘Mercury playback engine’ as if it refers specifically to GPU processing. Not true. The term ‘Mercury playback engine’ refers to a whole set of performance improvements in Premiere Pro, including the port to a 64-bit application, the multi-threaded nature of the application, and the use of CUDA and OpenCL on the GPU to accelerate some things. Anyone using Premiere Pro CS5 or later is getting all but one of these advantages; people with GPUs that meet the requirements are getting one additional advantage.

new and changed features in Adobe Media Encoder CS5

In a recent forum thread, someone said that they hadn’t seen much about what’s new and changed in Adobe Media Encoder (AME) CS5. So, let’s fix that.

64-bit application
Adobe Media Encoder CS5 now comes in a 32-bit version and a 64-bit version. The version that works with Premiere Pro and After Effects is the 64-bit version. (You don’t need to manually choose which one to use. This is taken care of automatically.) A 64-bit application can address more memory, which gives it the ability to work with larger frames and tends to make the application more stable.

export settings that automatically match sequence settings in Premiere Pro
Choose Match Sequence Settings when exporting from Premiere Pro. See “Workflow and overview for exporting”.

Similarly, when you choose a format, AME CS5 will in many cases automatically select the most appropriate encoding preset for that format based on characteristics of the source item. See “Encoding presets”.

much better controls for cropping and trimming before encoding
You can crop and trim the portion of the item to be encoded much more easily. One such improvement is the ability to select the work area (as defined in Premiere Pro or After Effects) as the area to be encoded and exported. See “Crop and trim source before encoding”.

footage interpretation
As with After Effects and Premiere Pro, AME now has an Interpret Footage command, so you can correct settings for input files if the application guesses wrong. See “Interpret items in the encoding queue”.

new export formats, including AVC-Intra
See “File formats supported for export”.

added preferences for managing the media cache database
See “The media cache database”.

preserving source timecode on output
AME CS5 honors timecode information in a source file. If the source starts from 00:00:05:00, then the timeline for the item in Adobe Media Encoder also starts from 00:00:05:00, and not from zero. This timecode information is included in the encoded output file.

improvements to XMP metadata workflow (including metadata thinning)
Among other improvements, you can choose what XMP metadata to pass through into the encoded output file. See “Export and thin XMP metadata”.

cue points for F4V files in data track
Previously, cue points for F4V files were only stored in an XML file. Now they can be embedded in the data track of the F4V file. See “Cue points for FLV and F4V video files”.

lots of little user interface tweaks to make things easier to find and use
Some things were moved out of hard-to-find menus and into the main UI area. Some things were renamed to make them more clear. Et cetera.


BTW, you should also install the Adobe Media Encoder CS5 (5.0.1) update. Instructions for doing so are on this page.


Premiere Pro team on Twitter and Facebook (and blogs and forums, of course)

The Premiere Pro team is using Twitter and Facebook to give and receive information about Premiere Pro.

The team Premiere Pro Twitter account goes by the name adobepremiere. Follow us.

Our Adobe Premiere Pro Facebook page has been active for a while now. Become a fan. Or friend. Or like us. Or whatever that’s called.

These are both team accounts, so you’ll be seeing things from me, from the software engineers, from the quality engineers, and so on.

We still use our blogs as a way to communicate things that we don’t want evaporating into the ether, the way that things on Facebook and Twitter seem to do so quickly. But the Twitter and Facebook channels are great ways to keep up with a (somewhat) steady stream of news and views.

So, please subscribe to this blog.

The Premiere Pro product manager (Al Mooney) also has his own blog and his own Twitter account, al_mooney.

Kevin Monahan, the new documentation lead for After Effects and Premiere Pro has his own blog and Twitter handle (@kev_mon), too.

We also really appreciate feature requests and bug reports.

If you have technical questions or need some help, the best way to ask is through the Premiere Pro forum. Several video editing professionals help people on that forum. The Premiere Pro team monitors that forum, too, so we can help you to get an answer there. When asking such a question, please supply information about the version number of your software, some details about your computer, et cetera.

shooting and editing HD video from DSLR cameras with Premiere Pro

Jason Levine has a series of video tutorials on Adobe TV that show how to shoot and edit HD video from DSLR cameras using Premiere Pro and other applications in Creative Suite Production Premium. These videos are aimed at photographers and other folks who are somewhat new to video editing, so this series serves as a pretty good overview of Premiere Pro in general.

These videos are collected on this page, which will accumulate more videos as Jason and others create new videos in this series.

(You can find even more information about DSLR/HDSLR video workflows using Premiere Pro using this Premiere Pro Community Help search.)

Jason’s videos are a whirlwind tour, covering a lot of material very quickly. I figured that some viewers might need links to additional information to fully understand everything that Jason was trying to communicate.

Here’s a rough breakdown of the subjects covered in each video, with some links to additional resources on each subject.

part 1: importing and setting up

part 2: basic editing

part 3: animation and markers

part 4: integration with Photoshop and working with text

part 5: exporting

Final Cut Pro XML export improvements in Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.2) update

If you haven’t already installed the Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.2) update, then you should do so. That updates fixes a lot of problems and adds a lot of new capabilities.

In the post providing details of the Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.2) update, one item says ‘various fixes for Final Cut Pro XML export’. A few people have asked what those fixes are, exactly. So, here they are.

  • Premiere Pro no longer appends file://localhost to network path names on Windows.
  • <name> attributes are now exported for <clipitem> elements.
  • Any special characters in the <reel> attribute are now encoded as XML instead of passing through untranslated.
  • The duration and rate of master clips are now set accurately instead of using dummy default values. This typically only matters for media that’s offline when the XML is imported, since the contents of an online media file overrule these in both FCP and Premiere Pro.
  • Markers and subclip offsets should now be written using the correct framerate instead of always being set to 29.97fps.
  • The <audio> element now has a new complex subelement <outputs>. <outputs> objects are exported for audio track groups. This subelement is used primarily for round-tripping 5.1 channel audio through Premiere Pro.
  • <audiolevels> objects are now written to tracks that have had audio level adjustments in Premiere Pro.
  • Each audio <track> element now has a new <hardpan> attribute (Premiere Pro proprietary) and <outputchannelindex> attribute (FCP standard) to help with multi-channel audio round-tripping.
  • <uuid> attributes are now exported for clips and sequences. These UUIDs (universally unique identifers) can be used for custom workflows. When using the normal FCP import mechanism, Premiere Pro will generate new UUIDs for each clip or sequence it imports through FCP XML, rather than reusing the ones in the XML file.
  • Fixed an FCP import failure on 64-bit Windows when running with top-down memory addressing.

See this page for details of exporting a Premiere Pro project as a Final Cut Pro XML project file.
“Export a Final Cut Pro XML project file”

Welcome Kevin Monahan, the new Premiere Pro documentation person.

As I mentioned recently, I’m now in Technical Support, providing online, one-to-many assistance for Adobe’s professional video software on forums and blogs and social-media-whatsits.

Now, it’s my pleasure to introduce my replacement in the role of “Community and Content Lead” (otherwise known as “documentation lead”) for After Effects, Premiere Pro, and Adobe Media Encoder.

I asked Kevin if he minded me sharing his email address with y’all, as I have done with my own, and he said that he’d like to continue the pattern of openness. So, here it is: kmonahan -at- adobe -dot- com

Kevin is especially interested in continuing the process of finding, linking to, and enabling the great tutorials, articles, and other resources that can add to the system of resources that can be used to learn Premiere Pro.

Of course, the best way to give feedback about the Premiere Pro Help document is still to add a comment at the bottom of the relevant page. You can add comments to add information, to add links, to make corrections, or to ask for clarification.

Premiere Pro resources for Final Cut Pro and Avid Media Composer users

These PDF documents were created to ease the transition to Premiere Pro from Final Cut Pro and Avid Media Composer, but they’re also very good overviews for anyone getting started with Premiere Pro:

video2brain offers a course by Maxim Jago: Premiere Pro for Avid and Final Cut Pro Editors

Peachpit Press offers a book by Rich Harrington, Robbie Carman and Jeff Greenberg that is very good for the experienced editor moving to Premiere Pro from another NLE: An Editor’s Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro

Many more resources for getting started with Premiere Pro are here.

If you have questions, please come to the Adobe Premiere Pro forum, where Adobe personnel and fellow users can help you.

Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.2) update: bug fixes and CUDA support


UPDATE: The Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.3) update is now available and contains all of the fixes in the 5.0.2 update, plus many more.



Today, the Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.2) update was released.

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates for Premiere Pro CS5. Ideally, you should check for updates by choosing Help > Updates. But you can also directly download the update packages from the download pages for Windows or Mac OS, using the “Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 5.0.2 update” link. (If you download from the web page, you must choose the correct patcher based on your original installation type.)

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Premiere Pro forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.

There are a lot of fixes and tweaks in this update. You can read the complete list in the Premiere Pro 5.0.2 release notes. I’ll mention a few changes and fixes here, since some of these are important enough that I really want to make sure that people see them.

You should also install the Adobe Media Encoder CS5 (5.0.1) update (Windows or Mac OS), which got some bug fixes and additional formats and export settings presets, including several for F4V and FLV formats. (The download pages might not be updated yet at the time that you’re reading this.)

The After Effects CS5 (10.0.1) update is also available.


new and changed features

  • We made several improvements to RED (R3D) import and workflow. See the last section of this post for details.
  • Premiere Pro CS5 now integrates with CS Review.
  • QuickTime (.mov) files from JVC solid-state cameras can be imported.
  • Added sequence presets: Canon XF MPEG2 720p30 and Canon XF MPEG2 720p25.
  • Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.2) can export MXF files containing MPEG-2 essence items that comply with the XDCAM HD format used by such systems as Avid Unity. The standalone Adobe Media Encoder can also export files in this format.
  • Added support for source timecode in XDCAM HD422 files.
  • Added 10-bit DisplayPort support for NVIDIA Quadro cards on Windows.
  • Audio files in Broadcast Wave (.wav) format can be imported, and timecode in these files is read and preserved. Audio in exported OMF files can be in Broadcast Wave format.
  • Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.2) for Windows adds support for the following graphics cards to accelerate processing using CUDA technology on the GPU: GTX 470, Quadro 4000, and Quadro 5000. For a complete list of supported graphics cards, see the Premiere Pro system requirements. For more information about CUDA acceleration of processing and the Mercury playback engine in general, see Premiere Pro Help.

bug fixes

There are a lot of fixes in this update. For details and a very long list of fixes, see the Premiere Pro 5.0.2 release notes.

Note that we were able to find and fix a lot of these problems because of the great feedback that we got when we asked people to use the crash reporter. Please keep doing so. And don’t hesitate to file bugs and send feature requests.

Here’s a partial list of bug fixes in this update:

  • Various crashing issues fixed.
  • When using AIFF source audio, previews and rendered and exported audio were scrambled or jumped around. (See this Technical Support document.)
  • Adobe Premiere Pro projects files were growing very large (“bloating”), causing projects to take a long time to load, and sometimes causing projects to fail to load.
  • The time to start Premiere Pro, load workspaces, and load a project have been decreased (improved).
  • Title Designer panel showed no background video.
  • XDCAM HD422 files generated by Convergent Design Nano Flash were imported with garbled audio.
  • XDCAM EX media in a project was reconformed every time the project was opened.
  • Four-channel audio recorded by Sony XDCAM EX camera was not being imported correctly.
  • GPU-accelerated export through Adobe Media Encoder didn’t work correctly on Windows.
  • Audio-only capture on Mac OS failed.
  • Time required to render a preview increased each time the sequence was rendered.
  • BMP and GIF files were not importing on Mac OS.
  • Preview files were missing when a project was reopened.
  • Various fixes for color shifts, gamma shifts, and incorrect color rendering for many formats and codecs.
  • Various fixes for Final Cut Pro XML export. (See this page for details.)
  • Various timecode fixes.
  • Various fixes for performance and stability when using still-image files.
  • Various fixes for performance, stability, and fidelity of CUDA-accelerated rendering using the GPU rendering pipeline in the Mercury playback engine (MPE).
  • Various fixes for Firewire (IEEE 1394) output.
  • Various fixes for Panasonic P2 media.
  • Various fixes for audio and video being out of synch and audio playing at the wrong time.

One of the fixes for audio and video synchronization problems involves the MPEG index (.mpgindex) files created when Premiere Pro indexes imported MPEG-based media. If you re-index these files after installing the update, some problems with audio playing at the wrong time may be fixed. You can cause a file to be re-indexed by deleting the associated MPEG index files from the media cache.


other software updates known to address problems with Premiere Pro

We have also been working with several providers of plug-ins, codecs, and hardware devices (such as Cineform and BlackMagic) to assist them in updating their software to fix some errors and crashes. Please take this opportunity to download and install updated codecs, plug-ins, and drivers from these providers, as relevant to your work.


known issues

See the Premiere Pro 5.0.2 release notes for other known issues.

  • Possible hang on start if firewall or other software (such as ZoneAlarm or FileMaker) blocks communication between Premiere Pro and related components. (See this Technical Support document for more information and solutions.)

updates for RED (R3D) footage and new REDCODE plug-ins

  • Updated support for build 30 (Mysterium-X sensor, new color science) support: This is the same support that’s available as the RED3 Importer prerelease available on the Adobe Labs website. The difference is that the new RED importer software is installed with the Premiere Pro 5.0.2 update, so you don’t need to install the importer plug-in from the Labs website. For more information about changes and bug fixes in this importer, and how to make it work, see this blog post about the updated RED importer.

    Note: If you save a project using R3D files from Premiere Pro CS5 5.0.2 and then open the same project in Premiere Pro CS5 5.0.0 or 5.0.1, R3D footage items in that project will be reset to default source settings. Premiere Pro CS5 5.0.0 and 5.0.1 use an older version of the RED importer plug-in. Also, Premiere Pro CS4 and Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.0 and 5.0.1) projects that use color science version 1 will use the new color science (version 2) when opened using Premiere Pro CS5 (5.0.2). If you are using R3D footage in a multiple-machine environment, make sure all machines are using the same version of Premiere Pro.

  • Initial support for RMD metadata sidecar files: RED (R3D) video files can store settings in RMD (RED metadata) sidecar files. Premiere Pro 5.0.2 introduces a Save RMD button in the lower right of the RED R3D Source Settings dialog box, with which you can save the current settings in the dialog box to an RMD sidecar file. You can also load or reload a sidecar file and set the settings in the dialog box to those in the sidecar file by clicking the Reload From RMD button. If there is no RMD sidecar file associated with the video file, the Reload From RMD button resets the settings to the defaults.
  • Support for RED Rocket cards: RED Rocket cards are optional cards that can accelerate decoding and debayering of RED (R3D) files. To tell Premiere Pro to make use of an installed RED Rocket card, use the Enable RED Rocket (Global Setting) menu in the RED (R3D) Source Settings dialog box. The options are None, One, and All. The One and All settings refer to the maximum number that will be used by Premiere Pro; if fewer are available, then only the available number will be used. If another application acquires the ROCKET card before Premiere Pro does, Premiere Pro does not display a message at launch that it will fall back to software (non-ROCKET) rendering.

Help documents for Creative Suite CS5, CS5.1, CS5.5, and CS6 applications (PDF and HTML)

This page includes links to the Help documents (user guides, manuals) for CS5, CS5.1, CS5.5, and CS6 applications.

These are just the English-language documents. I gave links to some documents in other languages here.

Note that for each application there is a link for CS5 and CS5.5/CS5.1, as well as a link for CS6. The CS6 link actually goes to a document that includes information about CS5, CS5.5/CS5.1, and CS6 versions of the application—all together. Unfortunately, there is no document for just the CS6 version of each application.

If you’re using CS5, CS5.1, or CS5.5 versions, you’ll want to use the link for just CS5 and CS5.5/CS5.1 versions. The PDF documents that include documentation for CS6 versions are missing many features found in the documents for CS5 and CS5.5, including working cross-reference links.

Important: If you have feedback about CS6 documentation, please give it on the Community Help forum, where the right people will see it, not in the comments of this blog post.

Other documents in the Help system, including reference documents

Several applications have additional documents, including API references, programmer’s guides, and other resources for creating and using extensions. For those documents, see the respective home pages for the documents listed above.

PPBM5: Premiere Pro Benchmark for CS5 and CS5.5

Bill Gehrke and Harm Millaard have put together a performance test suite for Premiere Pro CS5 and CS5.5, PPBM5.

You can run the suite of tests and use the results to determine where the performance bottlenecks are with your computer system. The results posted on the website give really good insight into what factors matter for performance, even without you running the tests yourself.

Harm and Bill give good instructions for interpreting results and general hardware advice.

Harm and Bill are also both very active on the Premiere Pro forum, especially the Hardware forum, where performance tuning is always a hot topic.

There’s additional information and links to other resources about setting up a system to optimize performance here:
“optimizing for performance: Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects”

Getting started and Help and Support pages in several languages

[See the related post for After Effects.]

We’ve just published some new pages with getting-started resources, Help documents, and additional community resources in several languages.


English


More information on how to find information about Premiere Pro is here: “How to search for Premiere Pro tutorials, Help, and more”


Deutsch


Die folgenden Übungen und Lernressourcen, die von Adobe und Experten der Community vorbereitet wurden, bieten Anfängern und erfahrenen Anwendern einen Überblick über Premiere Pro.


Français


Ces didacticiels et ressources de formation proposés par Adobe et des experts de la communauté donnent aux utilisateurs néophytes et chevronnés un bon aperçu d’Adobe Premiere Pro.


日本語


アドビとコミュニティエキスパートによるこれらのチュートリアルと学習リソースでは、初心者も上級レベルのユーザーも Premiere Pro の概要を確認できます。


Español



Italiano


maximum dimensions in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5, CS5.5, CS6, and CC

There have been quite a few questions lately on various forums about what the maximum image (frame) size is that Premiere Pro can handle.

This confusion is understandable, since there are actually several different limits depending on exactly which kind of image frame you’re talking about, and there were changes to the numbers for Premiere Pro CS5.

sequence size:

The maximum sequence frame size in pixels is 10,240×8,192 (widthxheight). If you attempt to set one of the Frame Size dimensions higher than this limit in the Sequence Settings dialog box, Premiere Pro will reset the value to the maximum.

still image and movie size:

The maximum frame size that can be imported for still images and movies is 256 megapixels, with a maximum dimension of 32,768 pixels in either direction.

For example, an image that is 16,000×16,000 pixels is OK, as is one that is 32,000×8,000, but an image that is 35,000×10,000 pixels can’t be used.

GPU acceleration:

Whether a frame can be processed by the GPU acceleration portion of the Mercury Playback Engine depends on the size of the frame compared to the amount of GPU memory.

To be processed by the GPU acceleration, a frame requires ((widthxheight)/16,384) megabytes.

If that value exceeds the available memory, Premiere Pro will use the CPU only for rendering of the current segment.

This means that some images will not use CUDA acceleration on some cards but will on others.

For example, one image size from a Canon T2i is 5184×3456. Doing the math, this requires 1,094MB, which just exceeds the 1GB available on the Quadro FX 3800, but is still within the 1.5GB of the Quadro FX 4800.

exporting video with an alpha channel (transparency)

You can export a file from Premiere Pro that includes an alpha channel (transparency).

In the case of FLV files, including the alpha channel just requires making sure that the Encode Alpha Channel box is checked.

QuickTime, AVI, and some other formats require you to specify the inclusion of an alpha channel from a color depth or channels menu. In some cases, a plus sign (as in Millions Of Colors+) denotes an alpha channel. In other cases, choosing to output to 32 bits per pixel implies the inclusion of the alpha channel; this refers to an output depth of 8 bits per channel for each of four channels: RGBA (where A is for alpha).

For general information about exporting, see “Workflow and overview for exporting”.


Export an FLV file with an alpha channel

  1. Select the sequence.
  2. Choose File > Export > Media.
  3. In the Export Settings dialog box, choose FLV|F4V from the Format menu.
  4. Choose an FLV preset from the Preset menu.
  5. On the Video tab, select Encode Alpha Channel.
  6. Set other settings and click Export or Queue to export as you normally would.


Export an AVI or QuickTime file with an alpha channel

  1. Select the sequence.
  2. Choose File > Export > Media.
  3. In the Export Settings dialog box, choose Microsoft AVI or QuickTime from the Format menu.
  4. On the Video tab, choose PNG, None, or Animation from the Video Codec menu, and choose 32 from the Depth menu.
  5. Set other settings and click Export or Queue to export as you normally would.

updated Premiere Pro and Adobe Media Encoder Help documents

I just updated the following Help documents:

Now would be a good time to grab a fresh copy of the PDF version, which you can do from the top of any page of the HTML versions linked to above.

I incorporated information and corrections from several hundred comments. We really appreciate it when you add comments to the pages of Help on the Web to give some additional information, links to tutorials, corrections, et cetera. (One thing that comments on the Help pages aren’t good for is questions that are better suited for the user-to-user forums.)

By the way, this was my last act as documentation lead for After Effects (which I have been for several years), Adobe Media Encoder (which I have been for several months), and Premiere Pro (which I have been for a few weeks).

I’m now in Adobe Technical Support, focusing on providing online technical support for these same applications. So, you’ll see plenty of me if you spend any time on our forums. Now more than ever I will be trying to help y’all solve problems with using these applications and trying to make sure that your feedback gets to the right place. With that in mind, please read this post about how to send feedback and communicate with us. We really want to help, and we really want your feedback, but it’s crucial that it come through the right channels so that the right people can see it. (I wrote that post for After Effects, and I’ll soon write one targeted at Premiere Pro, but the information is all the same but a few details.)

workflow guides for several high-end cameras and formats in Premiere Pro and After Effects

Adobe has been putting out several white papers, workflow guides, and other materials to give the nitty-gritty details of how to work with several high-end cameras and formats. Many of these resources are collected here.

This blog post is a summary of some of these resources, and links to some that aren’t captured on this page.

Note that most aspects of working with most of these formats in After Effects and Premiere Pro are not significantly different from working with movie files using other formats and codecs, so the instructions for importing and exporting are much as you find in the general documentation on importing and exporting in After Effects Help and Premiere Pro Help:

These workflow guides were written for Premiere Pro CS6 and After Effects CS6, but most of the material is still useful if you’re still using the CS5.5 version. If you don’t yet have CS6 Production Premium, you can order it here… or try it free for 30 days so that you can make full use of the features described here.


RED digital cinema (R3D)

“Using Adobe Premiere Pro with RED digital cinema content”

This paper gives an overview of working with RED (R3D) digital cinema files.

Recently, Adobe and RED presented an hour-long online seminar about using Adobe software with RED Digital Cinema cameras. Representing RED was Ted Schilowitz, and representing Adobe was Wes Howell, software quality engineer.

If you have questions about using RED Digital Cinema cameras and footage with Premiere Pro and After Effects, the best place for those questions is the RED User forum, where several experienced editors and Adobe staff are active.


Panasonic P2

“Adobe Creative Suite Production Premium: End-to-end workflows for Panasonic P2 and P2HD cameras”

This paper describes working with footage from Panasonic P2 and P2HD cameras in AVC-Intra 50, AVC-Intra 100, DV, DVCPRO, DVCPRO50, and DVCPRO HD formats.


AVCCAM

“Adobe Creative Suite 5 Production Premium: End-to-end editing workflows with Panasonic AVCCAM cameras”

This paper describes working with footage from Panasonic AVCCAM cameras using the AVCHD codec.

  • Part 1: aquiring and archiving AVCHD footage
  • Part 2: ingesting and logging footage in Adobe Prelude CS6 (more detail here: Prelude Help)
  • Part 3: working with AVCHD footage in Premiere Pro (more detail here: Premiere Pro Help)
  • Part 4: working with AVCHD footage in After Effects (more details here: After Effects Help)
  • Part 5: delivery options and working with AVCHD footage in Adobe Media Encoder (more details here: Adobe Media Encoder Help)


Canon digital video camcorder and DSLR cameras

“Using Adobe Premiere Pro with Canon Digital Video Cameras”

This paper covers video formats used by Canon video cameras–DV, HDV, AVCHD, and Canon XF (MPEG-2).

Adobe Premiere Pro also offers native support for high-definition video shot with the Canon 5D Mark II, 5D Mark III, 7D, 1D Mark IV, and EOS Rebel T2i DLSRs. For the DSLR workflow, see Karl Soule’s video, “Working with HD digital SLR footage in Premiere Pro”.

Jason Levine has a series of video tutorials on Adobe TV that show how to shoot and edit HD video from DSLR cameras using Premiere Pro and other applications in Creative Suite Production Premium. These videos are aimed at photographers and other folks who are somewhat new to video editing, so this series serves as a pretty good overview of Premiere Pro in general.


XDCAM

“Using Adobe Premiere Pro with tapeless Sony XDCAM content”

This paper describes working with footage from Sony XDCAM cameras in XDCAM, XDCAM HD, XDCAM HD 50, XDCAM EX formats.


JVC ProHD

“Using Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 with file-based JVC ProHD content”

This paper describes working with footage from JVC ProHD camcorders.

video tutorials, didacticiels, tutoriels, Lehrgänge, チュートリアル, esercitazioni, tutoriales

[See the corresponding post for After Effects, too.]


English


Adobe and its partners provide a basic set of video tutorials on the Adobe website (CS5+CS5.5, CS4, CS3), in addition to excellent tutorials provided by other members of the community.

Because most features don’t change substantially from one version to the next, most materials created for Premiere Pro CS3 are still valid and useful for Premiere Pro CS5 and CS5.5. I find that many of the tutorials created for CS3 are still very much worth watching.

Many sections of Premiere Pro Help refer to additional video tutorials in context to provide information about specific features. If you know of an excellent video tutorial or other resource about Premiere Pro, please leave a comment at the bottom of the relevant page of Premiere Pro Help on the Web to tell others about it.

From the Community Help page, you can also search for community resources not on the Adobe website.


日本語


アドビ システムズ社で、ビデオチュートリアルの基本セットを提供しています(CS5 + CS5.5, CS4, CS3)。他にも、コミュニティのメンバーから提供された優れたチュートリアルも提供しています。

Premiere Pro のヘルプでは、特定の機能に関する情報を提供するために、文中で様々なビデオチュートリアルを参照しています。 Premiere Pro の日本語チュートリアルや、日本語で説明された制作例などをご存知でしたら、Premiere Pro オンラインヘルプの該当するページのコメント欄にてご紹介ください。コメント欄は、各ページの一番下にあります。

コミュニティヘルプページでは、アドビ システムズ社の Web サイト以外のコミュニティリソースも検索することができます。


Deutsch


Adobe und seine Partner stellen der Adobe-Website einige grundlegende Video-Lehrgänge bereit (CS5 + CS5.5, CS4, CS3). Sie werden ergänzt durch hervorragende Lehrgänge von anderen Community-Mitgliedern.

In vielen Abschnitten der Premiere Pro-Hilfe wird auf weitere, kontextbezogene Video-Lehrgänge verwiesen, die über spezifische Funktionen informieren. Wenn Sie interessante und hochwertige Tutorials oder andere Quellen kennen, die sich mit Premiere Pro beschäftigen oder artverwandte Themen behandeln, hinterlassen Sie bitte einen Kommentar auf der jeweiligen zugehörigen Seite der Adobe Premiere Pro Onlinehilfe, so dass andere Anwender diese auch finden können.

Auf der Seite Community Help können Sie auch nach Community-Ressourcen suchen, die nicht Teil der Adobe-Website sind.


Français


Adobe et ses partenaires proposent un ensemble basique de tutoriels vidéo sur le site Web d’Adobe (CS5 + CS5.5, CS4, CS3); ils s’ajoutent aux excellents didacticiels d’autres membres de la communauté.

De nombreuses sections de l’aide Premiere Pro renvoient à d’autres didacticiels vidéo en contexte pour fournir des informations sur certaines fonctionnalités spécifiques. Si vous avez un bon tutoriel vidéo ou d’autres ressources en français à recommander pour Premiere Pro, partagez-les avec d’autres utilisateurs en écrivant un commentaire en bas de la page concernée sur l’aide en ligne d’Adobe Premiere Pro.

Sur la page de l’Aide communautaire, vous pouvez également rechercher des ressources communautaires qui ne figurent pas sur le site Web d’Adobe.


Italiano


Adobe e i suoi partner offrono un set di base di esercitazioni video sul sito Web di Adobe, oltre alle ottime esercitazioni fornite da altri membri della comunità di utenti.

In molte sezioni della guida di Premiere Pro potete trovare riferimenti a esercitazioni video rilevanti per specifiche funzioni. Se Lei sa di un esercitazione video eccellente o altra risorsa circa Premiere Pro in italiano, La preghiamo di lasciare un commento in fondo alla pagina relativa di Premiere Pro Aiuto per il Web per dire ad altri di esso.

Dalla pagina Community Help, potete inoltre effettuare ricerche nelle risorse della comunità che non si trovano nel sito Web di Adobe.


Español


Adobe y sus socios ofrecen un conjunto básico de tutoriales en vídeo en del sitio Web de Adobe, además de los excelentes tutoriales ofrecidos por otros miembros de la comunidad.

Muchas secciones de la Ayuda de Premiere Pro se refieren a tutoriales en vídeo adicionales en contexto para proporcionar información sobre funciones específicas. Si sabes de un tutorial en video excelente, o de otros recursos sobre Premiere Pro en Español, por favor deja un comentario al pie de la página relevante de la Ayuda de Premiere Pro en la Web para compartirlo con otros.

Desde la página de Ayuda de la comunidad, también puede buscar recursos de la comunidad que no estén en el sitio Web de Adobe.

how to search for Premiere Pro tutorials, Help, and more

As I said in a post for After Effects, Community Help search is better than plain ol’ Google. Really.

To summarize that post, I’ll say this: Rather than using plain ol’ Google search, I recommend the much more efficient Premiere Pro Community Help search. I assure you that the Premiere Pro Community Help search will find virtually everything worthwhile about Premiere Pro that a regular search on Google.com would—and the Community Help search will filter out a tremendous amount of noise/garbage.

The Community Help search is actually a Google custom search engine that we maintain. We enter websites that have been vetted as being of high quality and as providing free resources about Premiere Pro, as well as other Adobe software.

If you find something free on the Web that is useful for Premiere Pro users but doesn’t come up in a Community Help search, tell us, and we’ll evaluate it for inclusion. (One of the ways to tell us about a resource is to add a comment to a relevant page of Premiere Pro Help on the Web, pointing to the resource.)

The Premiere Pro Community Help search is available from the top of every page of Premiere Pro Help on the Web.

You can also do this search from the main Premiere Pro support center page.

There’s also a Premiere Pro Community Help search plug-in for the most common browsers.

Note that you can just search within the Premiere Pro CS5 & CS5.5 Help document, too.

If you have any problems with searching Premiere Pro CS5 & CS5.5 Help, let us know. That includes telling us if you searched for something and couldn’t find it, as well as just not knowing what word to search for.

A good place to ask questions and give feedback is the Adobe Premiere Pro user-to-user forum. Of course, if you have feedback about a specific page of Premiere Pro Help, then you can just leave a comment on the relevant page.

a call for submissions, suggestions, and so on

[Subscribe to this blog.]

My name is Todd Kopriva. Some of you may know me as the guy who’s been helping you to find information about After Effects for the past several years. Now it’s also my job to help you to find information about Premiere Pro.

I’ve been a Premiere Pro user for years, but I’ve not been as deep into the Premiere Pro resources (e.g., tutorials, forums) as I have been for After Effects. So I’m asking for your help. In this post, I’ll point to some things that I’ve built up for After Effects, and then I’ll ask you to help me to find the building blocks with which to do the same for Premiere Pro.


community resources in all languages

I provide a list of informational resources about After Effects, both on the Adobe website and on other websites: “After Effects community resources (in several languages)”

I’d like to build up a similar list for Premiere Pro.

Please send me email (at kopriva [at] adobe {dot} com) to tell me what websites I should include.


getting started resources

I created this page for After Effects CS4 and updated it for After Effects CS5: Getting started with After Effects (CS4 and CS5). We also created a getting-started portal page: “Learn After Effects CS5: getting started and tutorials”.

We already have an instance of the latter for Premiere Pro CS5: “Learn Adobe Premiere Pro CS5: getting started and tutorials”. What would you like to see changed on this page? Added? Removed?

What about an equivalent to the hand-holding getting-started overview? What would you put in such a post for Premiere Pro?

Please send me email (at kopriva [at] adobe {dot} com) to tell me what you think.


additions, corrections, and links for Premiere Pro Help

Please, please, please leave comments on the relevant pages of Premiere Pro CS5 Help on the Web.

Is a page unclear? Leave a comment and tell me. Be specific.

Is the information incomplete? Leave a comment and tell me. If you have the information to fill in the gap, please leave it in the comment and help thousands of your fellow users.

Is there a web page that explains something better than a page of Help, provides additional information, or is otherwise useful and relevant to the topic? Leave a comment and tell us. Don’t be shy about promoting your own website. We encourage it.

Do you know about a tutorial, article, or other useful free resource about Premiere Pro? Find the relevant page of Premiere Pro Help, leave a comment, and tell us.


changes to Premiere Pro Community Help search

We’ve fine-tuned the After Effects Community Help search so that you can search across high-quality websites for After Effects material.

What about the Premiere Pro Community Help search? Try searching for your favorite resources. Are they included? Do you see results that are bad or just don’t make sense?

Please send me email (at kopriva [at] adobe {dot} com) to tell me what websites I should include or purge from this custom search engine.

Welcome Todd Kopriva to the Premiere Pro community

I’ll be leaving my post at Adobe at the end of this week, and Todd Kopriva will assume the lead position for Adobe Premiere Pro documentation come Tuesday morning (Monday is a U.S. holiday). Todd is an experienced computer-video writer and editor. Todd has been for years, and will continue to be, the After Effects documentation lead. I will continue to administer the Premiere Pro Training blog through Friday, May 28. Then, Todd will take this helm by Tuesday, June 1.

I plan to remain an active member of the Premiere Pro user community. I’m on Facebook as Stephen S. Muratore, and on LinkedIn as Stephen Muratore. You can email me personally at my adobe.com email address through Friday, 5/28.