PremierePro

Adobe weblog about Premiere Pro and the success of Premiere Pro customers worldwide

Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2014.0.1 Update

Today we are releasing an update to Premiere Pro CC 2014. This version (Premiere Pro CC 2014.0.1) provides important fixes and enhancements to the editing experience, and is recommended for all users.

Users can install this update directly from the Creative Cloud desktop application.
A list of notable changes in this release appears below.

Bug Fixes:
• ‘Async’ asserts could occur when exporting some file types
• Incorrect angles could be shown when separate multicam clips were created with different sort order
• Waveforms could be improperly drawn when nesting a multicam source sequence
• Effects could fail to render within effect mask boundaries
• Garbage could appear around the edge of a layer that had a blur video effect applied and a mask on Opacity
• Masks could offset Gaussian Blur in CUDA mode
• Attempting to move a column to the left of the Name column in the Project panel could break cell selection
• Occasional instance where sequences could never finished rendering
• Relinking to spanned MXF clips could be incorrect
• UI responsiveness could reduce in large projects after relinking
• Exporting merged clips could generate silent or missing audio
• Importing sequences could sometimes fail
• Incorrect timebases could be used on EDL export
• Incorrect field display could occur when using Mercury Transmit with GPU acceleration
• Audio presets were sometimes not working correctly if used with a different format container
• Complex video assets could produce a blurry image every 1 second when encoded into H.264
• Mask Expansion could not be rendered correctly during preview scrubbing on layers that were scaled to 50% or less
• Applying a speed change to a multicam clip could cause the extended duration of the clip to play with no video
• Merged clips that contain clips with sync offsets could display out of sync indicators when used in a sequence
• Crashes could occur during export to QuickTime.
• Masking and Tracking: Brightness & Contrast could be incorrectly displayed in an Adjustment Layer
• File import failures could occur when no assets were selected in the Locate Media dialog
• Asserts and crashes could occur when exporting project to OMF
• Crashes could occur when rendering audio with a locked submix track
• Submixes could sometimes lose audio
• Noise could be heard in submixes with empty tracks
• Source monitor timecode and program monitor overlay could be off from one another in multicam sequences
• Audio overlays for Multicam and nested sequences would only display as audio time units.
• 24p/50p XDCAM EX files were sometimes 1 frame short when smart rendered
• MPEG2 TS files with 6 tracks of stereo audio could only play/show first stereo track when imported in to PPro
• Playing IMX 50 clip could freeze video
• Locking all Audio Tracks could cause the system to slow down dramatically

Editing Enhancements:
• A Codec column was added to the Project Panel
• Sequence Timecode was added as a display option in the Monitor Overlays
• Clip name and Timecode filters can now be set to reference and display information for clips on specified source tracks.

Premiere Pro World Conference – Year One!

Last weekend marked the first annual Premiere Pro World Conference ably organized by Adobe training partner – Future Media Concepts.  Although Premiere Pro Product Manager Al Mooney jokingly referred to it as a “1.0 beta” event, we all thought it was a great success, both for attendees and for the Premiere Pro team.

Screen shot 2014-07-16 at 10.56.03 AM   photo_5Photo credit: Gene Lew

The conference kicked off on Friday, July 11th at Adobe headquarters in San Jose, CA.  The Premiere Pro management, engineering and quality engineering teams were all there, along with support team members from social media, customer care, documentation, Creative Cloud Learn, marketing and even engineers from After Effects and Adobe Anywhere.

“Adobe Day” began with the history of Premiere Pro, presented by Senior Engineering Manager Dave McGavran. First launched in 1991, our favourite editing application has seen approximately 50 releases over the past 23 years, and today comprises a whopping 30 million lines of code. A highlight of the presentation was when Senior Solutions Consulting Manager Dave Helmly launched the Adobe Premiere 1.0 on an old PowerMac G3 running Mac OS 7. Talk about blast from the past!

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Al Mooney then spoke about the future of Premiere Pro (in general terms, anyway) and attendees were introduced to different members of the Premiere Pro management team.  The managers explained a bit about how the software is developed and what role each part of the team plays in the process.

A hot topic of discussion was how decisions are made about which features we develop.  Al explained that several years ago the team decided to focus strongly on the broadcast market, for one simple reason: “because it’s really, really hard.” The rationale being that if in the end we can make it work for broadcast, we can make it work for other users (but not necessary the other way around). Today, while Premiere Pro continues to score big in broadcast (a recent international sporting event held in Brazil comes to mind), we’re also working with top Hollywood filmmakers, such as David Fincher, the Coen Brothers, and others. Heck, even Sharknado 2 was cut in Premiere Pro!

Of course, along with big name users, development is guided by the feedback of all users including web content producers, music video creators and corporate and wedding videographers. The moral of the story being this: if you have a great idea for a new feature or functionality, submit a feature request!

photo_8Photo credit: Gene Lew

Along with larger roadmap development work, the Premiere Pro engineering team also deliver “Just Do It” (JDI) features whenever they can. Engineering Manager Steve Hoeg previewed an example of such a feature – simple, practical enhancements to the application that are a part of every new release. Attendees then split into breakout sessions together with various Premiere Pro engineers and quality engineers (QEs) to discuss the JDI process and different JDIs that are currently on “the list.”  Attendees were able to provide feedback on how they thought certain JDIs should be executed and, even offer ideas for new JDIs that would address pain points in their workflows.

photo_30photo_36Photo credit: Gene Lew

The final sessions for Adobe Day were four breakout groups focused on audio, color, effects and integrated workflows. Engineers and QEs shared thoughts on each of these areas and asked for feedback from attendees as to how they believe we should be addressing each topic, where they think Premiere Pro should be going and what they would love to see in the future. Customer Experience Designer David Kuspa said, “Receiving comments and feedback from users face-to-face reminds all of us who we’re working for and how large an impact our work can have on the creative output of these professionals.”  The whole day left the Premiere Pro team with plenty of notes to take back to our engineering work and planning.

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For the Premiere Pro team one of the best parts of the “Adobe Day”, as well as Premiere Pro World Conference as a whole, was the opportunity it provided us to not only get feedback and input from attendees, but to interact with Premiere Pro users on a personal level. Everyone was just hanging out and mingling during breaks, and meals through out the weekend as well as at an evening mixer on Friday where some of our top partners joined in and showed off some their gear.

IMG_1144IMG_1019IMG_1152The rest of the conference was comprised of sessions guided by various industry experts. It’s not often that you have so many top Premiere gurus in one place, but that’s what the attendees (and Adobe staff) were treated to. In fact, the only problem for many people was choosing which sessions to join – in most time slots four sessions were presented concurrently, so whatever you picked meant missing three other awesome sessions. Presenters included luminaries like Rich Harrington, Christine Steele, Robbie Carman, Kanen Flowers, Gary Adcock, Luisa Winters, Jeff Greenberg, Maxim Jago, Eran Stern and Liran GolanJerle Leirpoll travelled all the way from Norway to be here!

Attendees were able to attend sessions to develop core editing skills, advanced editing techniques, broadcast specific workflows, deep dives into encoding, publishing and distribution, and get answers to burning questions about hardware, workflows, and the art of editing.

Another highlight of the weekend were the keynote presentations. On Saturday Adam Epstein spoke of the unbelievably fast turnaround for the work he does with the Saturday Night Film Unit.Attendees and trainers alike were impressed withwhat Adam and his team accomplish every week – and talk about tight timelines: generally their shorts are not completely finished until minutes before they air. In one case a piece aired directly from the Premiere Pro timeline. “If someone had pressed the space bar, we’d have been screwed,” laughed Adam. In addition to the sheer entertainment value, attendees walked away from the session inspired – and with some really cool tips for how to structure their own workflows for maximum efficiency.

IMG_1177If you missed the Premiere Pro World Conference, or just want to see Adam again, you might just be able to do that! He is doing The Cutting Edge Tour this summer in  32 cities throughout the US and Canada.

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Sunday evening’s keynote focused on the demands of broadcast and how Adobe has become a key player in that world. Turner Broadcasting’sBryan Pearson showed how Premiere Pro, Adobe Anywhere and Creative Cloud workflows are used at CNN.  He shared how the team at CNN has worked closely with Adobe on the development of the Adobe Prelude and Premiere Pro workflows for broadcast. In many ways, this presentation provided an apt bookend to Al Mooney’s introductory keynote and gave concrete examples of how Adobe’s work in broadcast has helped improve Premiere Pro and the Creative Cloud video tools for everyone.   Bryan also spoke at length about Adobe Anywhere, which is fast becoming integral to meeting the future needs of CNN’s international collaborative infrastructure.   CNN creates approximately 3,000 assets each day from 44 different locations around the world and the broadcaster’s input has helped Adobe define Adobe Anywhere as a workflow platform that allows distributed users to access content and projects across standard networks, wherever the users may be located.

All told, it was a fantastic event packed with learning, insights, and inspiration. We heard amazing feedback from many attendees during the conference and the sentiments seem to be echoed across the web.

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The first annual Premiere Pro World Conference was a meaningful experience for the Premiere Pro team, too.

We work so hard on this product and it was wonderful to see the passion, and meet so many people who care about it as much as we do.

photo_18Photo credit: Gene Lew

Hope to see everyone at Premiere Pro World Conference in 2015!

See more photos from the first annual Premiere Pro World Conference here

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Top-flight videos fuel the JetBlue brand

Airline’s in-house video team uses Adobe Creative Cloud to tell stories that engage and inspire crewmembers and customers

JetBlue Airways began flying in 2000 with a promise “to bring humanity back to air travel.”  That commitment is the backbone of the airline’s external brand, as well as its internal culture; JetBlue’s workers are “crewmembers,” whether they’re based on the ground, in the sky, or at the offices.

In 2014, for the tenth consecutive year, JetBlue received the highest honors in airline customer satisfaction among low-cost carriers in the J.D. Power North America Airline Satisfaction Study. A technological innovator from inception, JetBlue maintains and builds on its rapport with customers and crewmembers through a steady stream of story-driven videos. Jonathan Weitz is the manager of digital and online communications for JetBlue Airways, and he approaches his work with enthusiasm.

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Adobe: Tell us about your background.

Weitz: I started my career in broadcast journalism, working as a camera operator and video editor in local affiliate television.  After seven years, I wanted to move into a reporter/producer role. Unfortunately, I looked too young for broadcast television. I went into radio, working my way up from weekend host to morning show co-host and executive producer. But my heart was in visual media, so I went back to school to get my master’s degree.

Graduate school led to my current career in digital and online strategy. I orchestrated the digital strategy at Pratt Institute, an art and design school. As a freelancer, I worked on video projects for commercial companies and for nonprofits like the Coalition for the Homeless, United Nations Foundation, and the 92nd Street Y.

Adobe: What led to your position at JetBlue?

Weitz: I’m a huge aviation geek; I even got my pilot’s license. When I heard that JetBlue was looking for a person to lead video projects, I jumped at the opportunity.

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Jonathan Weitz

I’ve been here since July 2013. There are three of us on the video team and we produce approximately eight videos a month. It’s about 50/50 internal and external content. When I first started, entire projects were hired out, often at great expense. Now we do the majority of the work in-house but we also rely on a trusted list of New York-based freelancers to edit or shoot a project.

Adobe: Is there an overarching approach to content?

Weitz: JetBlue has a very strong external brand because of our culture, our crewmembers, and our values. We look at storytelling through lens of our crewmembers. What stories can we tell to engage, activate, and inspire them? For example, we recently produced a video tied to our new service to Detroit. Whenever we add a destination, we do something special to give back to that community.

 

In Detroit, we partnered with First Book, a nonprofit that provides new books to children in need. On our first day, JetBlue executives and crewmembers went to a grade school that had the poorest performance record in the state of Michigan for 2012/2013; its library was virtually empty. We donated brand new books and laptops, and students got their own books to take home.

We made that video for our crewmembers. A video like that makes people within JetBlue feel good about where they work, and encourages them to find their own ways to give back. JetBlue is in 87 different cities; showcasing these stories strengthen internal culture. That’s why JetBlue is the company it is.

Adobe: Is there crossover between internal and external videos?

Weitz: We consider repurposing potential with every video request. A lot of internal videos go external, including the Detroit video. We may edit an internal video to better address an external audience but the more longevity a video has, the better the return for us. All external, customer-facing videos go on YouTube and Vimeo, and are posted separately on our Facebook page. We use Vimeo for internal JetBlue videos, privacy-restricted to our Intranet site.

In June 2014 JetBlue introduced Mint, its refreshing new take on a premium coast-to-coast experience. We wanted a way to get crewmembers excited about Mint’s fully-flat seats, fresh dining options, and revitalizing amenities. We created a video series titled (Mint)roducing to highlight our partners and provide a bit of personal insight into the founders and vision behind each company.

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Filming Mint(roducing)

To date, we’ve created a video for Blue Marble Ice Cream, Mah-Ze-Dahr Bakery, and Flying Food Group, with more to come. This is an ongoing series that will continuously live on and grow as we grow. The series certainly has crossover. It gives insight to our customers on what to expect onboard. It also gives crewmembers knowledge on the products and little gems of information that they can use when interacting with each other and our customers.

Adobe: Have you always worked with Adobe Premiere Pro?

Weitz: Earlier in my career I used Final Cut Pro a lot. After graduate school, I worked on a freelance project for Dell. The footage had been shot on RED, and I knew transcoding would take forever. That’s when I tried Premiere Pro for the first time. I’ve never looked back.

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Filming Dell project

We use Premiere Pro for all video editing and Adobe proficiency is part of every discussion I have with freelancers. In fact, we have a template project folder setup—with an organized folder structure, project files, fonts, and style guides—so that our freelancers can spend less time on mechanics and more time on creativity all while keeping our videos consistent.

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Template folder structure (open)

Adobe:Are you using other applications in Creative Cloud?

Weitz: Creative Cloud is great because it covers the entire spectrum of our creative departments. We use After Effects for all lower thirds, title cards, and graphics. We can create project files in After Effects and easily transfer them into Premiere Pro; there’s no need to import or export anything.

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Adobe After Effects template – lower third

Creative Cloud is also a boon to our work with JetBlue’s design and brand team that creates the visual brand of JetBlue, everything from signage and seatback cards to the paint scheme of the airplanes. We’ll send the designers footage when we’re working on a video; they’ll, create an asset in Photoshop, send us the file, and everything is updated automatically.  We finish projects very quickly and we all work well togetherbecause everyone is one the same platform.

Adobe: Are there particular features or individual products in Creative Cloud that you like, or that help with deadlines?

Weitz: It used to be that you installed software from CDs and DVDs, and you had to wait for the next version to fix any bugs. With Creative Cloud we’re always working with the latest versions of a product. We have immediate access to anything that’s new, be it a feature or a fix, which is critical.

We spend a lot of time in Premiere Pro and the layout and user interface are elegant and easy to use. Adobe really understands what filmmakers and storytellers need to best do their jobs. The integration among app in Creative Cloud is terrific. We can be working in Premiere Pro and easily open an audio track or music track in Adobe Audition to clean up the sound, or jump to After Effects to add graphics.

Adobe: How did you create the “Thank you” video?

Weitz: We were ecstatic when we learned the results of the J.D. Power survey. We’re nothing without our customers and crewmembers, and we wanted to make a video to recognize the people who made this honor possible.

 

Whenever I visit a historic building, I think about what it must have been like at its peak. I began picturing an airport terminal that was deserted, but had clearly once been alive and thriving. “Thank you” juxtaposes empty spaces in a terminal against the audio hustle and bustle of a busy airport. When we scouted the airport to figure out our shots we also recorded the sounds that help tell the story: a baggage carousel turning; people talking; a gate announcement; the boarding call; the inflight crew welcoming people. The video came out exactly as we wanted: a heartfelt thank you to customers and crewmembers who bring this airline to life.

See more JetBlue videos on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/user/jetblue

Follow Jonathan on Twitter: @WeitzJonathan

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Once in a lifetime experience in Brazil

As a senior engineering manager at Adobe, I’ve been very lucky to visit broadcasters, post houses, and other customers all around the world. I really appreciate learning about how customers use our products and what types of content they produce. Getting to know the people and the cultures during these trips is always my favorite part.

Recently, I had the opportunity to travel to Brazil for that big international soccer (of course I mean football) event that just concluded. Adobe Premiere Pro CC was selected as the editing platform for the event, so we put together a team to go on site at the IBC (International Broadcast Centre) to learn from the workflow and the editors. Learning about how they build the production and how the people setup for such a huge event was very interesting.

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I could tell from the moment I landed that the people in Brazil were excited about the event, everyone was obviously soccer crazed! The IBC was like nothing I have ever seen. I have been to broadcast networks around the world but this was very different. It was a huge presence that took over an entire convention center with three halls filled with broadcast networks and equipment.

It was all setup just for the event and everyone was working together to make it a success. Many people moved to Brazil for months at a time to bring the event to life, which was something I hadn’t realized. I enjoyed talking with the editors about other worldwide sporting events they’ve been involved with in similar ways.

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To support all of the people working there, the IBC had restaurants, laundry services, drug stores, and even an ice cream shop. There were buses all organized to take you from the IBC to wherever you wanted to go. It was definitely an amazing logistical effort. Of course there were TV screens all over the IBC showing every game that was on, including an 8K TV from NHK Japan.

From a broadcast perspective, it was impressive to see how many games and how many feeds per game were being captured. There was so much video available on a daily basis. The production team not only covered all of the games but also produced player profiles, supplemental content from around Brazil, as well as a range of graphics. The amount of content was enormous. And then they turned around the spots in mere hours with all that content and it looked amazing. All of the people working on the project were so talented and productive.

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Of course, it was also great to see the editors working with Adobe Creative Cloud applications, from Adobe Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC to Audition CC and even SpeedGrade CC to get the creative looks they wanted. It was essential that we supported growing files, especially AVCi100. This was the quality they wanted and it is a very demanding format. Over the past year, we worked very hard to optimize AVCi100 so it would be a fluid editing experience for the project and it was great to see our hard work pay off.

Many of the editors work with Avid and Final Cut Pro, and they really appreciated the high performance and stability that Premiere Pro offered. They loved learning about the keyboard shortcuts and streamlined editing tools, and commented on how easy it was to focus on being creative without the software getting in the way.

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The editors also seemed to really appreciate the native workflows supported through Premiere Pro CC. No matter what the producer or other content providers gave them, they were able to drop it on the timeline and start working. This was different than past years when they first needed to ingest that media and wait. Integration among the applications was also something they really loved. After Effects was heavily used and the ability to start in Premiere Pro and Dynamic Link to After Effects saved them a lot of time.

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Members of the Premiere Pro team were in Brazil to make sure the use of Premiere Pro CC was successful and that we secured valuable feedback that we can use to make the product better. But it was hard not to get caught up in the excitement of the event. I lived in Germany for about six years so I learned to enjoy watching football and the fans during the 2002 games. In Brazil, we watched almost every game at the IBC, as they were on every screen, but it didn’t compare to when I got the opportunity to attend the Chile vs. Spain game.

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The stadium was amazing and the organization of the whole event was perfect. The fans were all very happy and cheered for the entire 90 minute game. They were overwhelmingly rooting for Chile, which worked out as they won. It was my first time going to a live game and the energy at the football stadium is not comparable. It was much more emotional and louder than I expected after only going to U.S. sporting events. The game was great and really topped off the Rio experience. It made me appreciate why people around the world love the sport.

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The overall feeling in Brazil was great and the people were very friendly. Everywhere you went you could feel football was in the air. Going to the beach in Copacabana, which I didn’t have much time for, was quite an experience. There were so many people from all around the world. The whole beach was set up to celebrate with large screens everywhere. I even had a few caipirinhas at the beach until sunrise with some of the team, which was lots of fun.

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Capturing the essence of Brazil through motion graphics and art

Filmmaker embarks on journey documenting creativity around the world

When we last spoke with Graham Elliott he was just starting work on his next film, World In Motion, which he describes as, “a documentary film series that explores the dynamic connection between location and expression.” Since that time, Elliott has taken two trips to Brazil, the first stop on his global journey. In addition to interviewing creative professionals, he spent a significant amount of time capturing b-roll that will add texture and reference to the film. Now, he’s back in the United States and will spend the next few months working in Adobe Premiere Pro CC editing his content before his next trip to Japan in November.

Adobe: Tell us about your time in Brazil.
Elliott: I first went to Brazil in October for three weeks, then went back again this past January. With preparations going on for the World Cup and then the Olympics, there was an incredible buzz of activity. Brazil is all about rhythm and color. It takes a lot of influences from Africa, Europe and North America and makes them its own.

Adobe: How is this project different than your last film, New York in Motion?
Elliott: When we made New York in Motion we had three months to shoot, student help, multiple cameras, and the luxury of an open timetable. With World In Motion we needed to do a lot more advance planning. I traveled to Brazil four or five days before my partner, Roswitha Rodrigues, came to conduct the interviews. I spent time shooting b-roll to give the interviews context. Because of security concerns in Brazil, I had to rethink my camera package to be more mobile and inconspicuous. I did most of my shooting with a Canon 5D Mark II and GoPros.

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Adobe: What type of footage did you capture?

Elliott: Before I set out to shoot, I worked out a way of organizing the shots I wanted to capture. There is so much you can do and see and when you are on location it can be a little overwhelming. So, I created an index card system with a storyboard of the shot I wanted and all of the necessary logistics: time of day, equipment, security, etc. One example of content I captured was the view from the cable cars that go over the favelas. Shooting from this perspective let us show the expanse of humanity in these poorer areas.

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Adobe: How much time did you spend interviewing?
Elliott: When Rosie came in we did seven days of interviews in Sao Paulo and seven days in Rio. We wanted to go in without any scripted questions so we could have more of a conversation. We asked interviewees to describe their work, and from there each person took a different path. We didn’t want to go in with a preconceived notion of the creative essence of Brazil.

We started with Lobo, a company that has been a major inspiration, working with American and European clients, doing incredible motion graphics. The team there is incredible, and the founder, Mateus de Paula Santos, recommended other people for us to interview. We also connected with Super Uber, the company that recently did a huge texture-mapping project at the assembly hall in the United Nations building, projecting visuals onto the different surfaces. The team there gave us more recommendations of who we should see in Rio.

Adobe: What is different about the way work is created in Brazil?
Elliott: The school system in Brazil lacks proper funding and doesn’t have rooms full of computers, so students do a lot of tactile work. They have to make do with less, but that makes them push the boundaries of creativity in different ways. We saw a lot of handmade art that was then scanned into computers, giving the end creations a more tactile feel.

The work that artists create is also different depending on the city. Both Rio and Sao Paulo are interesting hubs of creativity. Rio is very green, has beautiful beaches, people are outgoing, and the artwork seems to reflect that with a lot of natural, organic elements. Conversely, Sao Paulo is a concrete jungle and people seem more introverted, which ultimately affects the way designers work and what they create. It will be interesting to look back after we’ve visited different locations and compare the references – how people create, what tools they use, where they start, and how much is influenced by culture, religion, tradition, and history.

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Adobe: What type of tools are creative companies you interviewed using?
Elliott: Many of the established motion graphics agencies are using Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects, Photoshop, and Illustrator. Rather than starting everything on the computer they do a lot of organic work, including models, paintings, and collages. After Effects is very popular for working with content after it is captured; it is the quintessential motion graphics tool. Designers we interviewed in Brazil are excited about Adobe Creative Cloud and keeping everything within the same workflow.

Adobe: What do you like about working with Adobe Premiere Pro CC?
Elliott: I really like the workflow in Premiere Pro. I shot a lot of timelapse content with the 5D Mark II, and it is so easy to bring the stills into After Effects, apply some moves, and then open them in Premiere Pro. Rendering is so much easier in Premiere Pro than it was in Final Cut Pro and there is also a lot more flexibility with color correction.

Adobe: Where else do you want to go on your World In Motion journey?
Elliott: In November I’ll be traveling to Japan and we also hope to go to South Africa, India and Europe, especially London, Amsterdam, Berlin, and Vienna. The film is about creativity and the field of motion graphics serves as the backbone. But we’re not just interviewing motion graphics artists, we’re also interviewing people in other art fields. Motion graphics is so much about rhythm, music, dance, photography, and design so we’re going out and talking to dancers, designers and musicians, which is really invigorating. It will be a long journey but I’m already excited about the story we’re going to be able to tell.

View some of Graham Elliott’s World in Motion footage from Brazil
https://vimeo.com/93174087

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