PremierePro

Adobe weblog about Premiere Pro and the success of Premiere Pro customers worldwide

Modern and daring filmmaking

Ambitious French filmmakers produce their first genre feature film using Adobe Creative Cloud and Adobe Premiere Pro CC

The zombie movie genre, which dates back as far as the 1930s, includes dozens of films from comedies to true horror classics. Insolence Productions, created by Anaïs Bertrand in 2009, combines both comedy and horror in a new film for zombie movie enthusiasts, Super Z. After producing nine award-winning short films, this is the first feature from Insolence Productions. The movie was filmed in the heart of France in September 2013 and directed by Julien Arnaud Tabarly Volte. Producer Laura Townsend worked with Co-producer Emmanuel Pampuri and Paul Ferré, the film’s talented editor, to create the film using an Adobe video workflow.

Super-Z_1

Adobe: How did you get started in the movie industry?

Pampuri: I started as cameraman in 1991 then worked on movie sets with montage, production, and finally in post production. For many years, I worked on the sets of live performances, helping capture the performing arts on video. I started my company, Les Machineurs, in 2006. We specialize mostly in post-production work but also cover the entire filmmaking workflow, from shooting to post production. We provide equipment and expertise, as well as the final output.
Townsend: I’ve been involved in the movie industry for the past eight years. I started as a production assistant then quickly moved up to director of production on short films and then full-length feature films. I started a company three years ago called La Ruche Production and produced Super Z in collaboration with Insolence Productions as a freelancer. I’ve worked with a multitude of production companies and studios on regional full-length feature films and I’m hoping to someday collaborate with U.S. filmmakers.

Adobe: What was your role with the film Super Z?

Pampuri: My role with Super Z is a bit complicated. I’m the workflow glue. I was initially the one that proposed the collaboration and brought the teams together for the realization of this motion picture. My role covered every aspect of the project from shooting to post production, including technical decisions such as equipment and software choices. I was the main coordinator for this film. Les Machineurs was also the digital lab for the film and, being the principle, I had my hands in many different aspects of its realization.
Townsend: I am a producer on the film. I met the directors about 15 years ago and was brought in by the group at Insolence Productions. I shared my role with the company’s founder Anaïs Bertrand. Over the years, I’ve collaborated with the directors and the technical team on a multitude of projects.

Super-Z_2

Adobe: Have you personally used Adobe Premier Pro CC?

Pampuri: I used Adobe Premiere Pro CC for post-production work on Super Z. I’m a member of the Adobe influencer program and use Premiere Pro on a regular basis with most projects I work on.

Adobe: Tell us about Super Z.

Townsend: It’s a movie that provoked a high level of interest among industry professionals, actors, and comedians. Given the unusual and unexpected nature of its horror/comedy premise, the projects was a challenge that many of us were eager to take on. For the same reasons, getting the financial support necessary to bring our ideas to life was a big challenge especially here in France. We had to seek help from the local film community, numerous private contributors, and the web, where we raised close to 13,000 Euros on Ulule.com.

A solid partnership with Adobe also helped us tremendously along the way. We ended up launching the project on a relatively small budget and are very happy with how things turned out thanks to Adobe Creative Cloud applications, especially Premiere Pro CC.

Super-Z_3

Adobe: How did Adobe Creative Cloud applications help?

Pampuri: The choice to go with Premiere Pro was an easy one to make. The tool made all our lives much easier. The footage was shot with RED cameras so we needed a tool that could support raw R3D file formats and allow us to rapidly upload and work with the files without wasting time formatting or dealing with compatibility issues. This aspect alone was reason enough for us to go with Premiere Pro.

Overall, there were many special effects in the film. We had a separate agency creating the effects and it was my job to help ensure a seamless workflow between all the teams involved. They used After Effects for simple 2D animations. We were able to gather elements from all different sources and easily integrate them into Premiere Pro without wasting any time dealing with compatibly or reformatting issues. Synergy, flexibility, simplicity, and efficiency were the identifiable benefits behind our choice of Adobe Creative Cloud.

Ferré: In the past I used Final Cut Pro and hadn’t used Premiere Pro for a project of this magnitude. With this film, I had Premiere Pro at my disposal and I was impressed with the overall speed of execution. We didn’t have to wait long hours for rendering and were able to use our raw R3D files directly from the cameras. The software itself was very intuitive and user-friendly. Compared to other solutions I’ve used in the past I can say it is very robust and fast. I greatly appreciated how much valuable time we were able to save thanks to Adobe Premiere Pro.

Super-Z_4

Adobe: Did you discover any new features while using Premiere Pro for the film?

Ferré: Real-time rendering was quite a pleasant surprise for me. When I made edits, I was able to export right away and see the result without having to wait a long time for rendering or reformatting. We can apply effects and filters and visualize the result in real time instead of waiting for hours.

Adobe: Were there any challenges?

Pampuri: At the beginning we had issues finding the right computers along with the appropriate hardware add-ons to tackle such a colossal project. Due to our limited budget, we were using an outdated Mac Pro computer that didn’t allow us to take full advantage of all the features that came with the software. Since we had budget restrictions, we struggled a bit getting the right equipment to do the job. There were issues with audio cards and memory capacity. After we upgraded the equipment and had the right technical infrastructure, everything worked well and we were able to make up for lost time.

Adobe: Can you see yourselves using Adobe video tools in the future?

Pampuri: Les Machineurs is already standardizing on Adobe Creative Cloud. Whether it’s Premiere Pro, After Effects, or Prelude, we appreciate the robustness and efficiency of this set of tools.
Townsend: My team and I were truly impressed with the performance of Adobe Premiere Pro CC. I plan on using it in post-production environments in the future project. My company already uses Adobe Audition for music videos and sound treatment.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

Turning the spotlight on modernized production

British network transforms production with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise

For more than 50 years, ITV has delivered beloved and successful programming to households throughout the United Kingdom. Today, ITV is probably best known for its flagship serial dramas, Coronation Street and Emmerdale, both of which have been on the air for thousands of episodes and found popularity with audiences around the world. Decades of experience with the fast turnaround of these dramas has underlined the importance of efficient production and streamlined workflows. In his upcoming talk at IBC, Martyn Suker, head of production innovation for ITV, will share some of his secrets to establishing superior production workflows.

Adobe: Tell us about what you do at ITV.

Suker: My main focus is to set and continuously review the digital production strategies across ITV Studios. I also support and advise teams for all our productions. Sometimes that means helping a show find the right facilities, developing a new workflow, or helping them maximize the creative opportunities of emerging technologies or techniques, at other times it can mean advising on standard camera policies.

ITV_1

Adobe: What is the production modernization program?

Suker: We’re always looking for ways to improve processes and the way that we work. Right now, our main focus is on how we can simplify our production workflows. It’s not just about swapping out a few pieces of software or hardware here and there. It’s an overarching change program looking at roles and responsibilities, best practices, and the entire production culture. Ultimately, we’re looking to save time and money during production so that we can shift more value on screen.

Adobe: What were you looking for in a solution?

Suker: We were definitely looking for an end-to-end solution. Having said that, when most people speak of an end-to-end approach, they are usually just referring to the post-production process. We look at the entire production process, starting from the early stages of commissioning and ending at the final delivery and archival. Importantly we want to track production information throughout the production lifecycle and wherever possible, automate mundane tasks. It’s about providing a better experience for users all round.

ITV_2

Adobe: How does Adobe Creative Cloud fit in to the production workflow?

Suker: We’ve been using Adobe Story CC Plus on Coronation Street and Emmerdale for quite some time. It’s a big operation; both shows have three or four crews working simultaneously everyday for 50 weeks a year. With such a fast turnaround they need to shoot out of order, so Story plays an incredibly important role in helping us keep track of schedules and scripts.

ITV_3

Designers have also been using Adobe After Effects and Photoshop for quite some time, but the two most recent additions to our workflow have been Adobe Prelude CC and Adobe Premiere Pro CC. By adopting an all Adobe workflow it’s possible to take advantage of the built-in integrations, allowing us to work more quickly and effectively.

Adobe: How does MioEverywhere support the production workflow?

Suker: MioEverywhere from Nativ.tv is a highly configurable production information and workflow management system that’s helped us take our workflow to a new level. We used it to build panels in Prelude and Premiere Pro that help simplify data and media management within that part of the process. One of the key advantages of Creative Cloud is the ability to do that type of integration, quickly and simply.

ITV_4

Adobe: How did you decide that the Adobe workflow was right for ITV?

Suker: We want productions to have the ability to choose the right tool for the job. We ran a pilot using Creative Cloud and MioEverywhere to produce a recent drama documentary. It was about ensuring we had the right approach, functionality and capabilities. There are always issues when you introduce something new, but you only discover those issues when you put it into a real environment—an actual production that’s got to meet deadlines and provide quality.

Adobe Prelude worked very smoothly by enabling the production team to log and ingest footage quickly and efficiently. The editor, like most of our editors at ITV, had never worked with Premiere Pro before and it was a complicated edit involving drama reconstructions mixed with archive footage. We proved there were no more issues than you would normally expect with such a complex piece of editing, indeed some things were better.

ITV_5

Adobe: What were the results of the pilot?

Suker: Prelude was particularly effective in providing huge time savings during ingest. Overall the benefits were significant and as a result we were able to move investment to on-screen talent. Having a recognizable high-profile leading actor may convince the network to give us a better slot in the schedule, pulling in a bigger audience and in turn, driving more revenue.

Moreover, it proved Adobe does not prevent us from working with other tools. For the pilot program, the producer wanted to work with a particular colorist and dubbing mixer. We just exported the masters, handed them over to the post-production house, re-imported the grade and dub and then finished the program in Premiere Pro. Even though it’s possible to handle everything within the Adobe workflow, we proved it’s also flexible enough to give production teams those options.

ITV_6

Adobe: Why did you get an enterprise term license agreement for Adobe Creative Cloud?

Suker: We can see opportunities to use Creative Cloud across the company, both in production and with our development teams. We want choice and to encourage staff to experiment with different software within Creative Cloud to provide further benefit. For example, one of our production labels is using Creative Cloud to create content for all its YouTube channels. Using the full range of toolsets within the suite is saving a lot of time and indirectly of course, money.

Adobe: What are the next steps for ITV?

Suker: We got approval for funding based on the success of the pilot, so now we’re ironing out all the details in terms of the best configurations, implementing our learning from the pilot and procuring the right infrastructure to support initial roll-out across the company.

We’re also working closely with production, development teams and editors to get them used to working with Prelude and Premiere Pro. We’re really excited about its possibilities and the opportunities that for example, Adobe Anywhere might also offer in future.

Martyn Suker, Head of Production Innovation at ITV Studios, will be presenting in the Adobe stand at IBC 2014 on Saturday, Sept. 13th at 5:00pm, Sunday, Sept. 14th at 5:00pm, and Monday, Sept. 15th at 5:00pm.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

SRF creates original content for broadcast coverage

Swiss broadcasting company uses Adobe Creative Cloud to create show openers for top sports event coverage

Earlier this year, we interviewed Patrick Arnecke, head of design and promotion for Swiss Radio and Television (SRF) about the new opener the broadcaster created for its coverage of the Sotchi winter games. Since then, SRF has created similar openers for its coverage of the games in Brazil and the Europe Athletic Cup in Zurich. Representatives from SRF will be speaking at Adobe’s booth at IBC, where they will go into more depth about how Adobe Creative Cloud helps them craft these original content pieces. Here, Motion Designer Simone Nucci gives us a quick overview of what will be discussed.

SRF_1

Adobe: What cameras did you use to shoot the openers?

Nucci: We used RED EPIC for the action shots and Phantom Flex for the slow motion sequences. Everything that is shot is imported into Premiere Pro CC so we can quickly produce a rough cut. After we’re happy with the rough cut, we start to do all of the 3D tracking using SynthEyes. In the meantime we do all the keying and retouching, such as color adjustments of the athletes’ shirts, in After Effects.

SRF_2

Adobe: How do you work with Cinema 4D?

Nucci: Cinema 4D is used to make all of the backgrounds before everything is composed in After Effects CC. The programs work really well together and really speed up our workflow. We can import 3D information from Cinema 4D, such as lights and camera data, and it updates in After Effects with one click without rendering again and again.

SRF_3

Adobe: Are there any After Effects CC features that make a difference in your workflow?

Nucci: Working with the Roto Brush in After Effects is really fast. Not everything in the openers was shot on a green screen. Sometimes we had lights or small objects in a shot that we had to rotoscope out and Mocha AE made it very easy.

All compositing and color correction is done in After Effects before we render the shots out for Premiere Pro, where we adjust the cut and create several cutdowns for other design elements. In the end, everything is rendered out as a QuickTime movie.

SRF_4

Adobe: What other Adobe Creative Cloud applications do you use?

Nucci: We do part of our matte paintings in Photoshop for backgrounds and regularly use Photoshop and Illustrator for storyboarding and concept art. Illustrator is also used to create outlines for 3D objects because they are so easy to handle in Cinema4D. Basically, we used many applications in the package to create the three openers.

Simone Nucci and Simon Renfer, both Senior Motion Designers at SRF, will be presenting in the Adobe stand at IBC 2014 on Sunday, Sept. 14th at 2:00pm and Monday, Sept. 15th at 10:30am and 1:00pm.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

Announcing the next release of Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2014

Adobe’s professional applications continue to evolve at a blistering pace, and today we are thrilled to be announcing new features coming soon to the next release of Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2014, which is accompanied by announcements of all other video and audio desktop applications including Prelude, After Effects, SpeedGrade, Media EncoderAudition and Adobe Story Plus. For an overview of the top new features for Adobe Pro Video check out the Creative Cloud blog – or reference our data sheet for more specifics.

 

All of the video applications feature a refined user interface, with new support for HiDPI displays on the Windows platform, accompanying the existing support for Apple Retina displays.

Premiere Pro boasts several new media and project management features to speed up workflows, especially when working across multiple projects and collaborating with others. New Search Bins allow editors to build new bins automatically, based on metadata searches within a project, with results showing as aliases of the original project items. An advanced Timeline Search makes it simple to find and select clips within a sequence based on specific criteria such as Clip Name or Marker comment. Significant and powerful improvements have been made to Multiple Project Workflows - multiple Media Browser panels can be open simultaneously, allowing fast browsing of other Premiere Pro and After Effects projects for easy access to their media and sequences. And the new Source Monitor Timeline View allows editors to preview sequences from other projects, getting direct access to their components to quickly bring into the current active project. Editors collaborating over shared storage will find working with each other’s projects is now a great deal easier.

When you’re ready to archive or move a project, Consolidate and Transcode is there to help.  Consolidate and Transcode converts sequences or an entire project into a single codec, while retaining the ability to make edit adjustments later, and leaving original projects untouched. Render and Replace enables quick timeline renders of clips and dynamically linked After Effects composition, with the ability to return to the original media or comp at any time. And full encode/decode support for the GoPro CineForm codec offers Premiere Pro users a new, cross platform intermediate codec, with full support for alpha and large frame sizes of 4K and beyond – an excellent choice for workflows where transcoding to a well-performing intermediate codec makes sense.

Premiere Pro continues to be at the forefront of Ultra HD and 4K workflows, and now offers support for the AJA RAW format from the new AJA CION camera. As 4K RAW productions continue to increase and editors demand the best performance possible, Premiere Pro’s GPU optimizations also grow – this release sees GPU debayering for Phantom Cine and Canon RAW, alongside existing support for RED and CinemaDNG, for amazing playback performance.

Two of the major features from our June 2014 release also see major improvements. Masking and Tracking now offers performance improvements. a free-draw polygon pen tool, and easy, on-screen Bezier adjustments, with feathering and expansion now accessible directly from the monitor. And Master Clip Effects are enhanced, featuring indicators in the timeline to quickly see if a clip has a master clip effect applied, and improved navigation between sequence clip effects and master clip effects.

Audio workflows are also given a boost in the next release, with improved Send To Audition and enhancements to AAF export for workflows requiring integration with digital audio workstations. And of course, there are many other features and fixes in the release, with more information coming soon.

Adobe continues to develop the tools you need to stay creative while keeping up with the ever-changing video and broadcast industries, and we hope you’re as excited by the next wave of innovation in our creative video and audio desktop applications as we are. Stay tuned for more information.

If you can’t attend IBC in Amsterdam – be sure to keep up with all that’s going on with Adobe Pro video at the show on our dedicated Adobe Pro Video YouTube playlist!

Visit the Creative Cloud video page for links and news from Adobe at IBC 2014 from September 12–17.

MPC creates spectacular visions

Global VFX studio produces extraordinary motion graphics and visual effects with Adobe Creative Cloud

MPC is one of the world’s leading visual effects and motion graphics studios, with more than 2,000 employees in eight global offices. The studio’s work includes blockbuster films such as Godzilla, the Harry Potter franchise, and Life of Pi, and advertising campaigns for global brands including Samsung, Ikea, and Visa. MPC works with agencies, production companies, directors, and does some direct-to-brand engagements as well. Senior Motion Graphics Designer Will MacNeil, PR Manager Ella Boekeman, and Creative Director Dave Haupt explain the role of Adobe Creative Cloud in bringing their visions to life.

MPC_4

Adobe: What is important for us to know about MPC?

Boekeman: MPC does everything from initial concept art, treatment consultation, pre-visualization, shoot supervision, 2D compositing, 3D/CG effects, animation, color grading, and digital and experiential production. We have three main areas of work, MPC Film, MPC Adverting, and MPC Creative. MPC Film are best known for their work on blockbuster films and won the Academy Award in VFX last year for their work on Life of Pi. We launched MPC Creative as our standalone production arm to service clients who want us to manage the entire production process and to develop a more innovative range of technology-based solutions to their creative challenges. MPC Advertising is our more traditional commercials work.

Adobe: How does MPC use Adobe Creative Cloud?

MacNeil: As a motion design studio, we rely on Adobe tools every day. Artists use Photoshop CC at the beginning of projects when we’re designing ideas for pitches and during project design when we’re mocking up frames, textures, and backgrounds. We use After Effects CC for compositing video material. Adobe tools are the most fundamental part of the work we do.

Haupt: We also use Illustrator CC. For instance, we get a lot of photo-real shots and graphics that we animate. We start in Photoshop or Illustrator, and then bring the images or graphics into After Effects. The integrated Creative Cloud toolset is surprisingly simple. When we recently added Adobe Premiere Pro CC to our workflow, we thought it would be slower than our traditional pipeline. But when we conformed a three-minute promo for Camay soap, it was just as fast. Plus, it’s seamless to transition between desktop applications. We use InDesign for all pitches and treatments.

MPC_2

Adobe: How would you describe the general workflow at MPC?

Haupt: Our work varies quite a lot because we cover everything in the design spectrum including posters, online, and events. Typically, we meet with a director or agency and listen to their ideas and input. After that, we talk about the best way to shoot it. Everybody is trying to maximize budgets and extract greater value, whether in-camera, in VFX, or a mixture of the two.

After we come up with the best solution, we start doing concept work. We do a lot of character concept work and use Creative Cloud for pre-visualization. Quite often we use storyboard frames to make quick animatics that help bring ideas to life.

Adobe: What do you like about working with Creative Cloud?

MacNeil: Creative Cloud opens up projects to more people in the studio. A team may include one animator leading the job, while others focus on specific shots, visual effects techniques, or looks we’re trying to achieve. We give everyone a task that suits their skills, whether it’s drawing in Illustrator or creating animations in After Effects.

Haupt: The big thing is getting everyone involved. While we’re writing scripts and looking at locations, we’re always mocking up concepts, doing animation tests, and constantly working on the project so when it comes in from the editors, we’re ready to move forward.

MPC_3

Adobe: What were the drivers behind MPC’s switch to Adobe Premiere Pro CC?

Haupt: We were using Final Cut Pro, but wanted to explore Premiere Pro because of its tie-in with After Effects. Some projects have smaller budgets, so we needed a way around using Autodesk Flame for visual effects to save money and time. Now that we’re using Premiere Pro, we love it.

MacNeil: When we first worked with Premiere Pro CC we were impressed with its performance, as well as its integration with the rest of the Creative Cloud applications.

Adobe: Can you tell us about a recent project you completed using Adobe Premiere Pro CC?

MacNeil: We recently completed a title sequence and graphics package for German channel ZDF’s Champions League coverage. The job was directed by our in-house team Tom Robinson and Steve Ross.

Premiere Pro CC was an essential tool on the project. The job required reworking live action football footage into an outer space environment full of nebulae, asteroids, and planets, with lots of particle and FX work. The main title was made up of a series of live action shots, but placed together in a single, seamless camera move.

MPC_1

We used Premiere Pro in the animatic stage to try different live action shots against our music and to see how different shots worked together. Once a potential shot came in, we’d start to do some rough compositing work in After Effects and then, using Dynamic Link, we could open it in Premiere Pro and try it in different parts of the cut. We could move it all around the timeline and see how it played against the music, and also with the adjacent shots.

We used the time remapping in Premiere Pro, which is surprisingly simple and quick, to create speed ramps to work with the music. If we needed to make simple changes to the composite, we’d just open the shot in After Effects, tweak it, and then pop back into Premiere Pro where it would automatically update. Then we could get this updated offline to our clients very quickly and respond accordingly to their comments. It made what could have been a very tedious and time-consuming process much less painful.

Adobe: What other projects have you done using this workflow?

Haupt: We’ve worked on a number of fun projects recently, including a Bentley promo, a commercial for UK mobile provider Three, and an epic commercial for adidas that we’ll be discussing at IBC 2014. We’re always excited to work on projects that lead our team in new creative directions.

Check out the video interview with William MacNeil from IBC 2014:

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

 

 

 

Tell Us Your Story

Creatives all over the world are producing amazing work with Premiere Pro -
Tell us your story here

Ask a Video Pro Webinars

Boost Your Career with a Killer Reel - presented by Rod Harlan. Get tips & tricks for putting together a reel that grabs the viewer & shows off your work.
(Rescheduled) Thursday October 2, 2014 | 10am PST Register

LOG and RAW Workflow & Adobe Tools - presented by Robbie Carman. A discussion on cameras, media & monitoring best practices for RAW or LOG workflows with Adobe Premiere Pro, SpeedGrade & Adobe Media Encoder.
Thursday October 9, 2014 | 10am PST Register

Recent Sessions
What’s new in Creative Cloud for video - presented by Jason Levine LIVE from IBC Show 2014. Replay

Making the Switch to Adobe Premiere Pro - presented by Colin Smith Replay

From Photography to Videography: Filmmaking Tools in Creative Cloud - presented by Terry White Replay