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The Evolution of Film Editing

Originally posted to the Adobe Conversations Blog by Bill Roberts, Senior Director of Product Management, Creative Cloud Video segment

In 1934 the Academy Awards introduced a new category: Film Editing, awarding an Oscar to Conrad A. Nervig for his work on the movie Eskimo. Often called “the invisible art,” editing has made movies possible since they first began, but the field still struggles to gain the appreciation from the general public that it deserves.

At Adobe, however, we have always been big fans. To honor the art of film editing on the eve of the 87th annual Academy Awards, we’ve put together a quick visual timeline spanning 1890 to 2015. Conveying a sense of just how far we’ve come in relatively little time, this overview features a selection of the major milestones that have taken editors from the earliest manual splicing methods to the advanced digital editing software of today.

Evolution of Editing

Bill Roberts is the senior director of Product Management for Creative Cloud, Video Segment, at Adobe. He has worked in professional video and audio for over 20 years, with the majority of his career focused on developing software tools for creative professionals.  Bill’s career spans time spent editing for Canada’s largest private network, CTV, through to developing software for leading visual effects artists at Discreet Logic / Autodesk and helping broadcasters adapt to changing technologies and workflows at Avid. He is an expert on video, film and file based workflows and the impact that the Internet is having on both content creation and consumption. Bill is a graduate of Ryerson University in Toronto and resides in Montreal.

 

David Levy explores new worlds with “PLUG”

Famed Hollywood concept designer directs/produces sci-fi short using Adobe Creative Cloud

David Levy is an acclaimed art director and concept artist to the videogame and film industry. His credits include Avatar 2Tron: Legacy, Ender’s GamePrometheus, and Tomorrowland. He has now debuted his own short film, PLUG, which introduces the concept for a TV series he hopes to get off the ground. Levy not only funded, co-wrote, and directed PLUG, but also taught himself visual effects to finish it. He produced the 15-minute short from start to finish using Adobe Creative Cloud.

PLUG_03

Adobe: Tell us about PLUG.

Levy: The story is about a woman, Leila Dawn played by Natalie Floyd, who is the last human on Earth. Much like the Tarzan story about a boy raised by apes, the girl was raised by robots. She embarks on a journey to find out what happened, ultimately discovering human life and a new reality of what happened on Earth.

Adobe: What prompted you to create PLUG?

Levy: In my work as a concept designer, I developed new universes, but always for others. I wanted to do it for myself. Over the years, I learned shooting, editing, and directing skills. I knew I could make a film on my own, although a full feature film seemed out of reach. More than anything, I wanted a change.

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Rockstar energizes its brand with dynamic videos

In-house video team brings fans closer to the action than ever using Adobe Creative Cloud

From athletes to rock stars, Rockstar Energy Drink is made for people who live active lifestyles. Available in more than 30 countries, Rockstar has sold billions of cans worldwide. Like its name suggests, Rockstar is a brand built on excitement and action, and the company reaches its audience by sponsoring a wide range of sports and music events all over the globe. Rockstar’s video team delivers intense videos that capture the thrill of speeding around the BMX track or hurtling down snow-covered peaks.

Travis Valtierra on Switching to Premiere Pro: 

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“The Chair” explores filmmaking through the lens of two first-timers

Production team uses Adobe Premiere Pro CC to turn 3,000 hours of documentary footage into 10 compelling television episodes

Chris Moore, executive producer of Project Greenlight, has long been fascinated by the way different creative visions can take projects in wildly different directions. The Chair is a documentary series that follows two directors as they develop their first feature-length films based on the same original screenplay. Over the course of ten episodes, viewers are invited to join Shane Dawson and Anna Martemucci as they each bring their own artistic vision to life.

Rob Henry, who’s recently partnered with The Chair’s DGA-award winner Anthony B. Sacco and Director of Photography Dan Kavanaugh to form INTERSECTION, led the creative team in editorial, which was tasked with cutting thousands of hours of behind-the-scenes footage into ten, hour-long episodes. The team, including Editors Dave Henry and Jon Berry and Graphics Artist Austin Brown, began the project working with Avid but soon realized that Adobe Premiere Pro CC would allow them to handle the massive amount source footage more efficiently.

After airing on STARZ in 2014, the series is now available on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Vudu, Starz Play, and Starz On Demand and is available to purchase on DVD February 17, 2015.

The-Chair_5

The Chair Crew DGA win (L to R) Chris Moore creator/EP, Kyle Stratton Line Producer, Rob Henry producer/editor, Anthony B. Sacco director/EP, Dan Kavanaugh dir. of photography, Julia Perry Sacco domestic goddess, Josh Shader Co-EP/producer Not Cool & Hollidaysburg

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The 4K Production Workflow of Nippon Television Network

Japanese broadcaster, Nippon Television Network, implements a cost-effective solution based on Adobe Creative Cloud to create a dynamic and efficient workflow for ultra-high definition 4K broadcasts.

Nippon_1When the first 4K channel in Japan, Channel 4K, began test broadcasts, it started by airing live musical performances, travelogues, and sports broadcasts provided for free by members of the Next Generation Television & Broadcasting Promotion Forum. Since then, broadcasters have started to produce their own 4K programming , but the equipment remains costly. In addition, transcoding and outputting programs takes a great deal of time.

Originally a format developed for feature-length films, 4K was not intended for television programming where high volume production is valued. To begin introducing original 4K content in the broadcast space, Nippon Television Network Corporation (Nippon TV) developed a 4K programming production workflow using Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.

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