PremierePro

Adobe weblog about Premiere Pro and the success of Premiere Pro customers worldwide

April, 2011 Archives

merged clips and dual-system sound in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5

When you record audio from a device other than your camera, you often want to be able to synchronize the externally recorded audio with the video and manipulate this audio together with the video as if it were a single asset. With the Merge Clips command in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, you can do exactly that. You can use markers, In points, Out points, or timecode of clips from separate devices to synchronize them as part of the merge process or before merging.

This way of working with audio is often referred to as dual-system sound, and it’s especially common when recording video with HDSLR cameras and other devices that don’t typically include high-quality audio input hardware.

To see how to merge clips and synchronize audio and video tracks, see this video on the Video2Brain website and this video on the EventDV website.

In this video, Jason Levine shows how to use the Merge Clips command, as well as demonstrating a few other improvements in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5.

For complete details of what’s new and changed in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 integration with Audition CS5.5

Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Master Collection and Production Premium editions include Adobe Audition CS5.5, which is a much more powerful audio editing application than was Adobe Soundbooth, included in previous versions.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 includes an Edit In Adobe Audition command, which you can use to send individual clips, entire sequences, or just the selected work area—complete with reference video—directly to Adobe Audition for audio editing and sweetening. If you send an individual clip, Audition uses a render-and-replace process to automatically update the audio clip in Adobe Premiere Pro. If you send a sequence, you can choose to place the rendered audio in the audio track of your choice.

See this video on the Video2Brain website for a demonstration and explanation of this feature.

This video from Jason Levine also gives an overview of this feature.

For more information about using Audition with Adobe Premiere Pro, see “Working with video applications” in the Audition CS5.5 Help document and “Editing audio in Adobe Audition” in the Adobe Premiere Pro Help document.

For complete details of what’s new and changed in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

closed captions in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 adds the ability to attach a closed captioning data file to a sequence and preview the closed captions in the Program Monitor panel or on an external video monitor.

To preview the closed captions on an external video monitor, closed caption display must be enabled for the monitor. To preview the closed captions in the Program Monitor panel in Premiere Pro, choose Closed Captioning Display > Enable in the Program Monitor panel’s panel menu (the little icon in the upper-right corner of the panel).

This video by Karl Soule on Adobe TV and this video on the Video2Brain website show how to attach, preview, and export closed captions.

Premiere Pro can send closed captions to a DV monitor without any additional plug-ins. To send closed captions to other devices, you must use a third-party device and plug-in to read the closed caption data associated with a sequence and write that data into the video frames on output. Third-party hardware partners are adding support to send closed captioning data to their hardware output. At the time of this writing, MOTU and BlackMagic Design have already announced products to perform this task.

The closed captioning data that Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 can attach to a sequence can be in either .mcc files for CEA-708 data (for high-definition TV) or .scc files for CEA-608 data (for standard-definition TV). For information on closed captioning formats, see the “Closed captioning” page on Wikipedia.

Adobe Premiere Pro does not create closed caption data.

Additional information about the closed caption features of Premiere Pro CS5.5 is provided and discussed in this thread on the Premiere Pro user-to-user forum.

For details on all that’s new and changed in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

full-featured trial version for Adobe Premiere Pro

You can download the free, 30-day trial version of Premiere Pro here.

The trial version of Premiere Pro CS5 and earlier had a major shortcoming: It lacked many of the most useful and popular codecs, including codecs for MPEG-2, AVCHD, and RED media. This meant that people had a hard time evaluating the software for real-world use.

Not any longer.

The trial version of the current version of Premiere Pro includes all of the codecs that are included with the full version of Premiere Pro. This means that you can import and export to all of the supported file formats using the trial version.

See this page for more details about the trial version.

For lists of formats that you can import into and export from Adobe Premiere Pro, see these pages:

unified audio effects in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5

(For a video demonstrating these changes, see this page on the Video2Brain website.)

A lot of the changes that we made for Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 were to remove inconveniences, sources of confusion, and clutter. One small but very welcome change is the unification of the audio effects.

Previously, each audio effect had three instances—one each for mono, stereo, and 5.1 audio tracks. This was a nuisance.

In Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, each audio effects just has one instance. This makes applying the effects simpler, and it cleans up the structure of the Audio Effects folder. When you apply an audio effect, Adobe Premiere Pro automatically applies the effect of the correct type, corresponding to the item that you applied it to.

Some effects have restrictions, and can be used only on certain track types. See “Audio effects” for details.

For a complete list of what’s new and changed in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 improvements in CUDA processing and the Mercury Playback Engine

Before you read this post about what’s new and changed regarding CUDA processing in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, I recommend that you read this post about what CUDA is and what the Mercury Playback Engine is for Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.

OK, so now that you’ve gone and read about CUDA processing in Premiere Pro CS5, let’s move onto what’s new in Premiere Pro CS5.5.

(For a video overview of this information, see this video on the Video2Brain website.)

We have a few more effects and transitions that are accelerated by CUDA:

  • Film Dissolve
  • Additive Dissolve
  • Invert
  • Directional Blur
  • Fast Blur

The Film Dissolve transition is new in Premiere Pro CS5.5. It’s a dissolve transition that blends in a linear color space (gamma = 1.0). In simple terms, that means that it blends in a more realistic way; basically, dissolves look the way that they should. That’s not a CUDA-specific thing; I just thought that I’d call it out since this is the first time that I’ve had a chance to describe the effect.

One category of accelerated processes is very important but not really obvious in the user interface, as the accelerated effects are. I’m talking about various aspects of media preparation and footage interpretation. There’s a lot of processing that goes on behind the scenes when you’re bringing media of various types, sizes, frame rates, pixel aspect ratios, and so on into a sequence. Premiere Pro CS5.5 accelerates many more of these kinds of processes than did Premiere Pro CS5.

Premiere Pro CS5.5 accelerates processing for dealing with the following kinds of characteristics of mismatched media:

  • frame rate differences
  • field order differences
  • pixel aspect ratio differences
  • frame size differences
  • media with different alpha channel representations

Related to the above, frame blending and speed changes (including time remapping) are accelerated.

Similarly, processing of footage interpretation is accelerated for changes in frame rate, pixel aspect ratio, field order, and alpha channel interpretation, as well as pulldown removal. Interlacing and deinterlacing are also accelerated.

Premiere Pro CS5 was unable to use more than 4GB of RAM on the GPU (VRAM). Premiere Pro CS5.5 can use more than 4GB of VRAM.

We’ve added many graphics cards to the list of cards that provide the CUDA processing features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5. Below is a list of the cards added in this version. For a complete list, not just the list of changes in this version, see this page.

  • GeForce GTX 570
  • GeForce GTX 580
  • Quadro FX 3700M
  • Quadro FX 3800M
  • Quadro 2000
  • Quadro 2000D
  • Quadro 2000M
  • Quadro 3000M
  • Quadro 4000M
  • Quadro 5010M
  • Quadro 6000

You’ll notice that there are a lot more cards for laptops now. (They’re denoted by the M at the end of the card number.)

For more about what’s new and changed in Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 integration with Adobe Story

Adobe Story is an application for writing scripts (as in screenplays, not as in computer programming) that integrates with applications in Creative Suite. In Creative Suite 5, you had to use OnLocation as an intermediary to get script information from Adobe Story to Adobe Premiere Pro. Now, with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, you can go straight from Adobe Story into Adobe Premiere Pro.

This video on the Video2Brain website shows how to use a script from Adobe Story to improve speech analysis and then use the text metadata to edit video according to dialog in Premiere Pro. This video from Jason Levine gives an overview of the workflow.

One of the great benefits to bringing script information into Adobe Premiere Pro is that the script can be used to inform and improve the analysis of speech in a movie. When you use the speech-analysis feature, words in the audio track are converted into text metadata that you can use during editing. For example, you can navigate in a sequence to the exact time when a word is spoken by clicking the word in the Metadata panel.

For more information on Adobe Story, see the Adobe Story documentation. You can also follow and communicate with Adobe Story team on Facebook, forums, and Twitter.

For more of what’s new and changed in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, see this page.

Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5: What’s new and changed

Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5 is available. Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5 is included with such applications as After Effects CS5.5 and Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, which you can order now.

To see a video demonstration and explanation of the changes in Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5, see this video on the Video2Brain website.

If you want to ask questions about these new and changed features, come on over to the Adobe Media Encoder user-to-user forum. That’s the best place for questions. Questions left in comments on a blog post are much harder to work with; the blog comment system just isn’t set up for conversations. It’s also never too early to leave comments on the pages of the Help documents to ask for more information, point out areas that aren’t clear, and so on; Kevin, the guy who writes the Help documents, wants your input. You can also leave comments on the pages of the Help document to tell everyone about tutorials and other resources that you’ve found (or created) about these new features.


top new features and changes in Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5, with links to more information


Listing every change to the Adobe Media Encoder user interface here would be a daunting task, since so much work went into cleaning up, rearranging, and otherwise improving the interface for Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5. So, here are the top new features and changes, as well as a few that have made my life easier already.

  • Added encoding presets for iPad devices and other tablet devices.
  • Improved encoding presets for YouTube, Vimeo, and other popular output formats.
  • You can now import image sequences into Adobe Media Encoder.
  • Watch folder features are much improved, including ability to add the same watch folder to the encoding queue multiple times and assign multiple sets of encoding settings for multiple output types from the same source. Adding a watch folder is now as easy as dragging a folder into the Watch Folders pane.
  • The Start Queue Automatically When Idle For preference is off by default. (Yay!)
  • A new checkbox, Auto-Encode Watch Folders, gives you the ability to decide whether items in a watch folder are automatically encoded as soon as they appear, as opposed to waiting until the encoding queue is started.
  • Added context menus to many items, so that common commands are available by right-clicking (Windows) or Control-clicking (Mac OS) many items. An especially handy pair of such menu items are Reveal Source File and Reveal Output File, which show the location of the respective file in the Finder or Windows Explorer.
  • Added ability to drag a sequence from the Adobe Premiere Pro Project panel or a composition from the After Effects Project panel into Adobe Media Encoder to add it to the encoding queue. You can also begin the process of importing by double-clicking in an empty area of the encoding queue pane.
  • RED (R3D) source settings can be accessed using File > Source Settings, with improved RED support like that in After Effects CS5.5 and Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, including new color science support (REDcolor2, REDgamma2, REDlogFilm, etc.) and better curves and levels UI.
  • A chime sounds when the encoding queue is done processing, like in After Effects.
  • The trial versions of Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and After Effects CS5.5 include all codecs included with the full versions, so users of the trial version will be able to import any file that can be imported using in the full version, as well as being able to encode using any codec that can be used in the full version. Because Adobe Media Encoder receives its codecs from the client applications, this change expands the functionality of the Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5 trial version, too.

For a couple of early videos showing improvements to Adobe Media Encoder, see “Sneak preview of Adobe Media Encoder improvements to importing” and “Sneak preview of Adobe Media Encoder improvements to encoding”. (Please excuse the low audio levels in these videos. I was in a hurry to post these videos, and I neglected the all-important step of checking and normalizing my audio levels. Learn from my mistake.)

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5: What’s new and changed

(See this page for what’s new and changed in Premiere Pro CS6.)

Video2Brain provides a detailed set of videos about all of the new and changed features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5.

If you want to ask questions about these new and changed features, come on over to the Adobe Premiere Pro user-to-user forum. That’s the best place for questions. Questions left in comments on a blog post are much harder to work with; the blog comment system just isn’t set up for conversations.


top new features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, with links to more information


  • merged clips for synchronizing audio and video tracks in dual-system sound workflow, in which audio is recorded separate from video (common for HDSLR work)
  • Mercury Playback Engine performance improvements, including additional effects and tasks processed with CUDA and an expansion of the set of graphics cards that provide the CUDA-processing features
  • added ability to edit audio with Adobe Audition CS5.5, interchanging a single clip or an entire sequence
  • audio effects unified, such that you no longer need to apply a different effect depending on whether the audio track is mono, stereo, or 5.1 audio
  • improved speech analysis with scripts from Adobe Story
  • ability to attach a closed captioning data file to a sequence and preview the closed captions in the Program panel
  • new overlay that enables dragging of clips from the Media Browser, Project panel, or Source panel into the Program panel to perform an insert or overwrite edit
  • improved keyboard shortcut customization, including addition of a search field to the keyboard shortcuts dialog box
  • improved RED (R3D) features, including new color science support (REDcolor2, REDgamma2, REDlogFilm, etc.) and better curves and levels UI
  • enhanced native Canon XF support, including preview in the Media Browser and use of metadata
  • several user interface improvements that add up to a much more efficient user experience, including the following:
    • The Unlink command now decouples the audio portion of a clip while automatically deselecting the audio portion. The Unlink command now works on multiple clips at the same time, as well.
    • ability to add keyframes directly into the timeline using the Pen tool or Selection tool without having to first enable keyframing
    • ability to set keyframes without a modifier key

other new and changed features in Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5, with links to more information


Here’s a virtually comprehensive list of changes beyond the top few listed above (though not quite listing every minor tweak to the user interface).

projects and sequences

  • Added Sequence > Match Frame menu command.
  • Renamed General tab of New Sequence dialog box to Settings.
  • Renamed Desktop editing mode in the New Sequence dialog box to Custom.
  • Added ways to create a new sequence matching the characteristics of a clip: File > New > Sequence From Clip menu command and New Sequence From Clip context-menu command (i.e., command available when Control-clicking or right-clicking).

importing and managing footage

  • The trial version of Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 includes all codecs included with the full version, so users of the trial version will be able to import any file that can be imported using in the full version.
  • You can drag and drop assets from iTunes into the Premiere Pro Project panel.

editing

effects and compositing

rendering and exporting

  • Added ability to drag a sequence from the Adobe Premiere Pro Project panel into Adobe Media Encoder to add it to the encoding queue. For other Adobe Media Encoder changes, see “Adobe Media Encoder CS5.5: What’s new and changed”.
  • The trial version of Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 includes all codecs included with the full version, so users of the trial version will be able to render and export using any codec that can be used in the full version.

keyboard shortcuts

  • Added command for maximizing panels: Press the Shift+grave accent key (`) or choose Window > Maximize Frame to maximize the active (selected) panel. This is in addition to the keyboard shortcut (`) in previous versions that maximizes the panel under the mouse pointer, regardless of which panel is active (selected).

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