PremierePro

Adobe weblog about Premiere Pro and the success of Premiere Pro customers worldwide

May, 2012 Archives

Adobe Prelude CS6 (1.0.1) update: bug fixes and feature enhancements

Today, the Adobe Prelude CS6 (1.0.1) update was released.

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates by choosing Help > Updates. The best way to check for updates is by closing all Adobe applications other than Adobe Bridge, and choosing Help > Updates in Adobe Bridge; this ensures that all processes related to Adobe video applications have been quit and can be updated safely.

Ideally, you should install the updates automatically by choosing Help > Updates, but you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Windows or Mac OS.

For information about updates for other Adobe professional video applications, see this page.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Prelude user-to-user forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.


feature enhancements in this update

  • concatenation: You can now combine (concatenate) a series of clips into a single asset as part of the ingesting process. (Enable the Concatenate option in the Ingest dialog box.) Concatenation requires Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 to be installed and running on the same computer system as Prelude.
  • relinking: You can now reconnect a Prelude project to media files that appear offline because they were moved to another location. (Choose File > Relink.)
  • renaming: You can rename a clip in the Project panel by pressing the Return key when the clip is selected.
  • smart rendering: When creating a new asset during either the “partial ingest” or concatenation process, Adobe Media Encoder can create the new asset using the encoded video data from the original assets(s), without re-encoding. This ability to pass the video data through without transcoding is limited to a small number of formats, including DV, DVCPro, and MXF Op1a XDCAM HD and XDCAM EX.
  • API improvements: Improvements to the API for technical partners creating custom panels and markers include improvements for tighter integration and the ability to use time-of-day strings in markers, rather than only ticks or frames as units for markers’ start and end times. This is especially useful when creating applications that create unassociated metadata workflows, including iPad applications.

For more information about many of these features, see Prelude Help.


bugs fixed in this update

  • Markers that start or end outside of the boundaries of a subclip are now visible in the timeline when that subclip is added to a rough cut.
  • Fixed various crashes, hangs, and sources of error messages.

“Jump-start your production with Prelude CS6″ with Wes Plate, seminar recording and notes

Recently, Adobe Prelude product manager Wes Plate presented a seminar introducing Adobe Prelude CS6.

Here’s the recording.

If you don’t yet have Adobe Prelude, you can order it with CS6 Production Premium now … or try it free for 30 days.

Wes covered a lot of useful and interesting material, both in the main presentation and in the question-and-answer segment at the end.

Here’s a brief outline of what Wes talked about, as well as some links to more information about each subject:

What is Adobe Prelude?
Adobe Prelude is an application for ingesting, logging, and optionally transcoding tapeless media and assembling clips into rough cuts for use in an NLE (a nonlinear editing application). In addition to the summary in Wes’s presentation, both video2brain and Lynda.com have summaries that answer the question “What is Adobe Prelude?” in their video training courses.

Adobe Prelude intentionally has low system requirements compared with Premiere Pro, allowing Prelude to function on the sorts of inexpensive laptop computers likely to be used in the field and by production assistants and others who are given the task of logging large amounts of footage.

Adobe Prelude is not a direct replacement for OnLocation, which is an application that was used for tape-based media and is not included in Creative Suite 6 or Creative Cloud software packages. If you are using OnLocation, we encourage you to keep using it. If you want features from OnLocation to be included in future Adobe video software such as Premiere Pro or Prelude, let us know with a feature request.

ingesting, transferring, and transcoding media
You can ingest all or part of an asset, optionally transferring the file to a new location and transcoding it. If you ingest only part of an asset, then this partial ingest requires transcoding, which uses Adobe Media Encoder.

logging and metadata
You can add markers of various kinds to clips in Prelude, and these markers are stored as XMP metadata. This adding of markers, including marking In and Out points to make subclips, is known generally as logging. Prelude is designed to log clips using the keyboard, so it’s especially valuable to learn its keyboard shortcuts.

You aren’t restricted to the default set of markers. You can create your own marker templates and add and remove marker buttons from the interface to suit your needs.

Wes showed how “unassociated metadata” could be recorded during an event by someone watching the event and then later associated with the video shot of that same event.

rough cuts
You can create basic rough cuts in Adobe Prelude and either send them to Premiere Pro on the same computer or save them in a format that can be opened by an NLE on another computer. You can even save a rough cut in the FCP XML format recognized by Final Cut Pro 7 and many other applications. Note that a utility such as 7toX from Intelligent Assistance could be used to convert an FCP XML file to the XML format recognized by Final Cut Pro X.

where to go next
If you have questions, bring them to the Adobe Prelude user-to-user forum, and Wes and others on the Prelude team can help you there.

The Adobe Prelude online Help contains links to a lot of useful information, including many video tutorials.

Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.1) update: bug fixes and improved OpenCL performance

Today, the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.1) update was released.

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates by choosing Help > Updates. The best way to check for updates is by closing all Adobe applications other than Adobe Bridge, and choosing Help > Updates in Adobe Bridge; this ensures that all processes related to Adobe video applications have been quit and can be updated safely.

Ideally, you should install the updates automatically by choosing Help > Updates, but you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Windows or Mac OS by choosing the “Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 6.0.1 Update” for your operating system.

For information about updates for other Adobe professional video applications, see this page.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Premiere Pro forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.

We have also been working with several providers of plug-ins, codecs, and hardware devices to assist them in updating their software to fix some errors and crashes. Please take this opportunity to download and install updated codecs, plug-ins, and drivers from these providers, as relevant to your work. For more information about plug-ins and third-party hardware for Premiere Pro CS6, see this page.

We strongly recommend that users of Premiere Pro on Mac OS update to Mac OSX v10.7.4 for performance and stability improvements in that operating system update.


features added or changed in this update

  • Improved performance using OpenCL, especially when used on Mac OSX v10.7.4 or later.

    For details of GPU acceleration in Premiere Pro, see this page. For details of OpenCL features in Premiere Pro CS6, see this page.

  • Added encoding presets with additional bit-rate settings for XDCAM HD.
  • Added Automatic Peak File Generation preference in the Audio category for turning off automatic peak file generation for imported audio. By default, this preference is enabled and matches the behavior of Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.0).

    When this preference is disabled, importing audio or opening projects will not cause peak files to be generated. If peak files were already generated, then waveforms will be visible. Files imported before the preference was disabled will continue to generate peak files.

  • Enabled “smart rendering” and added Enable Smart Rendering Codec setting to the Video tab of the MXF OP1a exporters for XDCAM HD and XDCAM EX to enable or disable smart rendering for these formats. This option defaults to the off/disabled state. We’ll have more information about this feature in a post on this blog soon.
  • Added support for import of files and use of growing files from Sony XDCAM deck (XDSPE2000)

See details of the Adobe Media Encoder CS6 (6.0.1) update for more information about changes that affect output from Premiere Pro CS6.


bugs fixed in this update

  • Start timecode was not imported or exported correctly when working with AAF files.
  • Some files from the Canon 5D Mark III camera were imported with the wrong timecode.
  • Playing/viewing waveforms in the Source Monitor caused audio dropouts with some XDCAM HD clips.
  • NTSC MXF OP1a files that were exported with drop-frame timecode had video data that was tagged as non-drop-frame.
  • Switching the Renderer project setting from Mercury Playback Engine Software Only to Mercury Playback Acceleration GPU Acceleration on a computer using OpenCL caused Premiere Pro to crash under some circumstances. Switching between the two settings on a computer using CUDA would in some cases cause problems with video and/or audio playback.
  • Crash when using full-screen, cinema mode on some computer systems.
  • Tape capture was not working correctly with some third-party systems.
  • Crash when capturing from tape using some BlackMagic hardware.
  • An extra, black frame was included at the end of the output when exporting to P2 MXF in some circumstances.
  • First two frames were being played twice on external monitor using Matrox MXO2.
  • Crash when using “hover scrub” with Matrox MXO2.
  • Audio/video synchronization was off by a few frames when playing video on external monitor.
  • The Export Frame button was not exporting the correct frame, instead exporting a frame one or two frames away from the current frame.
  • Some audio files and some MXF files would go offline or have their audio reconformed when the project was re-opened or when Premiere Pro was minimized or lost focus.
  • Crash when modifying an effect property while playback was occurring.
  • Hang/freeze when using a dissolve transition on an adjustment layer.
  • Dropped frames and audio/video synchronization issues when exporting to tape using some third-party hardware.
  • Information about dropped frames on output to tape was not accessible to third-party systems.
  • Some QuickTime files were imported with the wrong field order.
  • When audio was sent through a Mercury Transmit plug-in, any number of channels that was not 2 or 6 was treated as mono.
  • In HDV editing mode, File > Export > Tape could not be used with third-party hardware.
  • The current-time indicator (playhead) was not returning to the current time after using the Play Around command.
  • Last several frames of output when exporting to tape were black.
  • When encoding a 23.976 fps video to H.264, the duration of the video in the output .m4v file was too short, and audio drifted out of synchronization with the video.
  • Transparency (alpha channel) information from a dynamically linked After Effects composition was rendered incorrectly in Premiere Pro.
  • Importing some QuickTime OP1a files caused Premiere Pro to hang.
  • The duration of the audio track sent to SpeedGrade using the Send To SpeedGrade command was the length of the entire Premiere Pro sequence, not the length of the work area.
  • Timecode written to trimmed clips using the Project Manager did not match the source timecode for some QuickTime files.
  • Various other crashes.

See details of the Adobe Media Encoder CS6 (6.0.1) update for more information about changes that affect output from Premiere Pro CS6.

“Edit your way faster with Premiere Pro CS6″ with Al Mooney, seminar recording and notes

Recently, Premiere Pro product manager Al Mooney presented a seminar introducing improvements in Premiere Pro CS6.

Here’s the recording.

This seminar was recorded before Premiere Pro CS6 was available. Premiere Pro CS6 is now available, as are other professional video and audio applications in Creative Suite 6 Production Premium, including Adobe Prelude and SpeedGrade. You can order CS6 Production Premium now … or try it free for 30 days.

For details of all that’s new and changed in Premiere Pro CS6, see this page.

Al covered a lot of useful and interesting material, both in the main presentation and in the question-and-answer segment at the end.

Here’s a brief outline of what Al talked about, as well as some links to more information about each subject:

some components of Creative Suite and Creative Cloud other than Premiere Pro

Mercury Playback Engine and performance

user interface redesign, concentration on media

editing efficiencies

effects

audio improvements

tape workflows

miscellaneous and Q&A

Adobe Media Encoder CS6 (6.0.1) update available

Today, the Adobe Media Encoder CS6 (6.0.1) update was released.

If Adobe Application Manager hasn’t already told you about this, go ahead and check for new updates by choosing Help > Updates. The best way to check for updates is by closing all Adobe applications other than Adobe Bridge, and choosing Help > Updates in Adobe Bridge; this ensures that all processes related to Adobe video applications have been quit and can be updated safely.

Ideally, you should install the updates automatically by choosing Help > Updates, but you can also directly download the update packages from the download page for Mac OS or Windows by choosing the “Adobe Media Encoder CS6.0.1″ update for your operating system.

For information about updates for other Adobe professional video applications, see this page.

If you have difficulty with this update, please bring questions and issues to the Adobe Media Encoder forum. Don’t ask questions in the comments on this blog post, which fewer people will see.


features added or changed in this update

  • Added encoding presets with additional bit-rate settings for XDCAM HD.
  • Enabled “smart rendering” and added a setting to the Video tab of the MXF OP1a exporters to enable or disable smart rendering for these formats.

    Full use of this feature also requires the Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.1) update.


bugs fixed in this update

  • Some encoding presets and codecs (MPEG-2, Dolby AC3) were missing from Adobe Media Encoder if activated using a yearly Creative Cloud Membership subscription license.
  • Canon 5D Mark III files were imported and interpreted using the Rec. 601 color space instead of the correct Rec. 709 color space.
  • NTSC MXF OP1a files that were exported with drop-frame timecode had video data that tagged as non-drop-frame.
  • In some cases, 23.976fps H.264 output had incorrect video duration, causing audio and video to be out of synch.
  • Colors shifted in some H.264 and MPEG-2 output.
  • Exporting a WMV file failed in some cases, and in some cases caused audio and video to be out of synch.
  • Some multiplexed H.264 Blu-Ray files caused faulty Blu-Ray Discs in Encore.
  • Import of some files caused the application to hang or took an extremely long time to complete.
  • Some QuickTime files were imported with the wrong field order.
  • Some additional causes of crashes were fixed.

OpenCL and Premiere Pro CS6

Beginning with Premiere Pro CS5, we have been using the GPU on certain graphics cards to process many things within Premiere Pro. This GPU processing (sometimes loosely referred to as “hardware acceleration”) relied on CUDA, a set of technologies from Nvidia.

We got a lot of requests from people using computer systems that couldn’t use CUDA—such as those with built-in GPUs from AMD—to expand our GPU acceleration features to also use OpenCL.

So, we did.

In Premiere Pro CS6, nearly all of the things that can be processed with CUDA on certain Nvidia GPUs can also be processed by OpenCL on certain AMD GPUs.

Let me address some common questions:


What can Premiere Pro CS6 process with OpenCL?

Everything that Premiere Pro CS6 can process with CUDA, with four exceptions:

  • Fast Blur effect
  • Gaussian Blur effect
  • Directional Blur effect
  • Basic 3D effect

In our first iteration of OpenCL processing, we weren’t able to get enough performance improvement for these four effects, so they are for now better left on the CPU. But everything else that Premiere Pro CS6 can process with CUDA can be processed with OpenCL, and that’s a lot.


OK, then. What can Premiere Pro CS6 process with CUDA?

There’s a lot of detail about that here for Premiere Pro CS5 and CS5.5:
“CUDA, Mercury Playback Engine, and Adobe Premiere Pro”

The only thing added for Premiere Pro CS6 is the Push transition.


What are the system requirements for Premiere Pro CS6 OpenCL processing?

AMD Radeon HD 6750M and AMD Radeon HD 6770M graphics card with 1GB VRAM in MacBook Pro computers running Mac OSX v10.7 or later

(See the system requirements page.)

[UPDATE: The Premiere Pro CS6 (6.0.2) update added OpenCL and CUDA functionality for the GT 650M GPU, which is in the newer MacBook Pro computers.]


Why only those cards?

We are very firmly committed to making Premiere Pro a stable, reliable, high-performance NLE. This involves thoroughly testing the configurations that we recommend and support. We needed to make sure that we could get the best possible performance and stability with these two very common systems before we could consider broadening our support to other systems.


Will you add more cards later?

We can’t talk about what we’ll do in the future, but I can ask that you look at how few cards Premiere Pro CS5 could use for GPU acceleration when it was first released, and then note how we’ve added cards to the supported list with several updates and upgrades. We make no promises about our future plans, but you may be able to determine something about our thought process by looking to past behavior.


What can I do to get the best performance and stability out of these OpenCL processing features?

The most important thing is to make sure that all of your software is up to date. That means making sure that you’ve got the most recent updates for Premiere Pro (choose Help > Updates), as well as making sure that you’ve got the most up-to-date graphics drivers and operating system updates. We are working with our partners, including the makers of graphics cards and operating systems to ensure that our systems work well together, and the best way for you to take advantage of that cooperation is to keep your software up to date.

The Mac OSX v10.7.4 update makes performance with OpenCL significantly better, and Mac OSX v10.8 makes even more improvements.

For details of all that’s new and changed in Premiere Pro CS6, and how to get it, see this page.

plug-ins and third-party hardware for Premiere Pro CS6

See this page for a list of companies that provide plug-ins for Premiere Pro, including plug-ins for effects, transitions, importing and exporting specific file formats, audio processing, titles, closed captioning, and workflow tools:

Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 In depth: Plug-ins

In addition to listing the plug-ins provided by each company, this page provides links to the companies’ websites, so that you can purchase these plug-ins or find how to contact them for technical support or customer service.

Another great place for information about plug-ins for Premiere Pro and After Effects is the Toolfarm website, which provides an online store as well as tutorials, a forum, and other supporting resources for using plug-ins.

On the hardware compatibility page on the Adobe website, you can find workflow guides for various cameras, as well as documents with details of compatible hardware for GPU acceleration, tape capture, broadcast monitoring, and more.

One of the very big changes in Premiere Pro CS6 is the new Mercury Transmit feature, which makes it much, much easier for third-party hardware developers to write the code necessary to receive video information from Premiere Pro for broadcast monitoring, exporting to tape, et cetera. Check with the vendor for your third-party I/O device to get the up-to-date drivers that make use of Mercury Transmit for Premiere Pro CS6.

If you want to develop plug-ins yourself, see the Premiere Pro Developer Center, where you can download the Premiere Pro SDK and supporting documentation.

Important: There have been few significant changes to the effect plug-in API for Premiere Pro CS6, so you shouldn’t need new versions of most plug-ins for Premiere Pro CS6, if you already have plug-ins that work for Premiere Pro CS5 or CS5.5. There are a few video effects that do require updates; e.g., Boris RED, DVDate, and a few others have needed to make updates to accommodate changes because of the new uninterrupted playback feature. Check the websites of the vendors of your plug-ins to see if you need an update for any reason.

However, beyond changes to the effect plug-ins themselves, some plug-ins come with installers, and (as with CS5.5) these installers may need to be updated to install plug-ins into the correct location.

Toolfarm is maintaining a list of major plug-in vendors and the status of their updates for CS6, and they have some helpful resources for installing plug-ins for which the installers haven’t been updated.

a few Creative Cloud and CS6 resources

We’ve been getting quite a few questions about Creative Cloud, as well as about activation, licensing, and such for CS6 software, so here are a few links to useful resources.

For details of what’s new and changed in the applications in CS6 Production Premium, start with these pages:

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