PremierePro

Adobe weblog about Premiere Pro and the success of Premiere Pro customers worldwide

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Premiere Pro CC and OS X El Capitan

We are aware of some issues users of Premiere Pro may experience after upgrading to OS X El Capitan. We are working hard to resolve these issues in an forthcoming release but currently recommend users remain on OS X 10.10.x.

Revealing the next release of Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Today we’re thrilled to be revealing what’s new and changed in the forthcoming updates to the CC 2015 professional video and audio applications, including Premiere Pro. (Please note that a bug fix update, Premiere Pro CC 2015 9.0.2, was released today, which is not to be confused with this feature update coming later in in the year).

For information about new and upcoming versions of all of our professional video and audio applications, visit the Creative Cloud blog or the Creative Cloud for Video page on adobe.com, and see demos of these new features at our IBC Online event on September 15th. We’re also tremendously excited to be able to announce that 20th Century Fox’s upcoming film Deadpool is being cut exclusively with Premiere Pro CC.

With this next release, Premiere Pro expands on its exceptional support for UltraHD, 4K and beyond workflows with new, native support for HEVC (h.265), DNxHR, and OpenEXR media, for both encode and decode, allowing editors to edit and deliver any format they need to.

The amazing, intuitive Color Workspace featuring the Lumetri Color Panel, designed to let editors to be creative with color without needing to work in a complex grading application, will be further enhanced with initial support for High Dynamic Range (HDR) workflows. With a supported external HD monitoring system, RAW camera formats and OpenEXR media, alongside the Dolby Vision mezzanine codec, can be edited and graded with much greater dynamic range than conventional video, by using powerful but intuitive HDR controls. And new HDR scopes will give editors precise feedback on their creative decisions.

Premiere HDR

We’re also adding the Lumetri effect to After Effects, ensuring color fidelity between Premiere Pro and After Effects (learn more about other new features coming to After Effects here).

Premiere Pro will let you build up your edit in new and tactile ways, by providing touch support for Windows hybrid touch devices like the Microsoft Surface Pro, and improved gestural support using Apple Force Touch track pads. Use multi-touch in the Assembly workspace for pinch to zoom to make your media clips big and easy to work with, then easily reorder them for storyboarding, play back and scrub right on the icons with your finger, tap to mark in and out points and drag straight to a sequence. Or, drag to the Program Monitor, where a new overlay will appear to allow you to drop into different zones to perform various standard kinds of edit. And onApple Force Touch track pads, get haptic feedback when snapping and trimming in the timeline.

Premiere Touch Edit

The addition of GPU optimized Optical Flow Time Remapping will let you get that smooth slow motion and speed ramps you want even when you haven’t shot at ultra high frame rates, and will provide significantly improved frame-rate conversion.

Premiere Optical Flow

And there are large improvements coming to the Adobe Stock workflow, which will let you search, try out and license any of the 45-million high quality royalty-free images through the Adobe Stock service built right into the Creative Cloud Libraries panel in Premiere Pro, as well as After Effects.

As with every release, there are loads of other improvements and optimizations throughout the application as our goal remains unchanged: to provide the best creative experience possible.

We hope you’re as excited as we are about these new releases, and we’re sure you can’t wait to get your hands on them. If you’re lucky enough to be at IBC, stop by our booth where we’ll be showing pre-release versions of what’s coming, and have fantastic customer presentations lined up. Our engineers and testing team are hard at work ensuring that, when we are able to release these features, you’ll have the best possible product we could have made – so stay tuned for more information on when these great new updates with be available.

If you have a Creative Cloud membership, you always have access to the latest version of Premiere Pro, so you’ll have access to this update as soon it’s released. Go to the Creative Cloud site to download applications or to sign up for Creative Cloud. If you aren’t a Creative Cloud member yet, you can try out Premiere Pro CC with a free 30-day trial here.

For more information about Creative Cloud, see this overview video and the Creative Cloud FAQ list.

 

New Features Coming to Adobe Media Encoder

New Features Coming to Adobe Media Encoder

At IBC in Amsterdam, Adobe will unveil the next round of updates coming soon to the Creative Cloud video applications, including Adobe Media Encoder, the rock-solid rendering and publishing tool for delivering video content to virtually any screen on earth.

Headline features in the next Media Encoder update include Destination Publishing to Facebook, expanded support for UHD formats, improved image sequence workflows, Automatic Loudness correction, and more.

AME_Max-Reveal_Screenshot

Publish to Facebook

Render and publish content to Facebook in one fell swoop. Easily showcase work, promote projects, or support social media campaigns on a platform where something in the order of 3 billion videos are viewed each day. Along with upcoming Facebook support, Destination Publishing also allows you to render and send video to Creative Cloud, Vimeo, and YouTube, giving you a super-fast delivery system for public or password protected video content.

Expanded UHD Support

Media Encoder will also offer Expanded UHD capabilities with the addition of support for XAVC Long GOP, DNxHR, and the new HEVC (H.265) codec, which, at 60% the size of comparable H.264 files, is ideal for delivering pristine 4K online content.

Improved Image Sequence Support

After Effects artists rejoice! You will soon be able to automate rendering for image sequences from After Effects (and other 3D apps) with new Watch Folder support for OpenEXR. Streamline your workflow for frame-based content and offload rendering so that you can continue working in After Effects.

Automatic Loudness Correction

Loudness standards are now de rigeur almost everywhere. All you need to do is check the box in the next release of Media Encoder to apply automatic Loudness correction and deliver content with confidence, knowing that your deliverables meet broadcast standards.

And there’s more

No, that is not everything: the next Media Encoder release includes a boatload of additions and enhancements, such as MXF Channelization, IRT compliance, IMX audio options to create PCM encoded audio (instead of AES3) and 16 channel export, a new HDR to SDR conversion filter, new Time Interpolation settings, a new Video Limiter in the Effects tab, and more. We’ll publish detailed release notes when the new version is available later this year.

Premiere Pro CC 2015 Update (9.0.2)

We are committed to ensuring Premiere Pro is as stable and reliable as possible – and today we are releasing the second stability update to Premiere Pro CC 2015 since our June launch, which contains important bug fixes, and is recommended for all users. You can install the update from the Creative Cloud desktop application or by logging into your Creative Cloud account.

A list of issues fixed in this release appears below.

  • Crash occurring when using 4 x JKL playback in Source Monitor and occasionally Timeline
  • Multicam playback failing under certain circumstances
  • Slow playback starting with multichannel multicam projects
  • Crash occurring when closing sequences open in Source Monitor
  • Panasonic spanned clips not importing correctly
  • Certain third-party effects causing a memory leak
  • Several issues with Subclips created from Merged Clips
  • Extraneous menu items showing in Libraries panel

New CUDA Driver for Mac

NVIDIA recently posted a new CUDA driver for Mac, downloadable here. NVIDIA are hopeful that it fixes many of the issues being reported by Mac users with their GPUs and is thus recommended for all users with such configurations.

Premiere Pro CC 2015 Update (9.0.1)

Today we are releasing an update to Premiere Pro CC 2015, which includes multiple bug fixes and stability improvements and is recommended for all users. You can install the update from the Creative Cloud desktop application or by logging into your Creative Cloud account.

Alongside the stability enhancements, a new feature has been added which allows masks to be saved with effects presets.

Key issues fixed in this release are listed below:

 

Performance and Stability

Heavy memory usage with Lumetri YUV Vectorscope

Improve AVCintra 100 performance

Importing many stills results in a crash

Crash when attempting to adjust a mask on a Lumetri effect

Hang when switching Lumetri Scopes to any other than Waveform

Crash on Windows if you open the Premiere preferences with invalid device settings

Premiere crashes when attempting to open a project that has an effect mask applied to the Fast Color Corrector video effect

The keyboard shortcut for legacy Source Settings was missing

Timeline panel auto-scrolls and follows mouse when no button is pressed

Timeline panel Mute buttons change state when playing/scrubbing sequence

Audio

Audio distortion playing 5.1 clip in 5.1 track with multichannel master

Buzzing audio distortion when switching (Switch Audio) multicam cameras during playback.

Round tripping AAF results in random missing track items

Multimono clips in multichannel sequences do not play all audio channels

Audio crossfade transitions cause A/V sync offset when Round tripping FCP XML

Exporting timeline to AAF stalls near end of export

Volume set to minimum value, has no effect on channel volume

Performance issues with Multi-cam edit with 40+ audio channels.

Audio meters are lost when moving focus from trim window to timeline

Audio meters do not function when opening a project.

Audio Track Mixer and Audio Clip Mixer controls do not function after re-opening a project.

Audio Pops and clicks playing cut points in the timeline after source monitor scrub or playback

Crash when recording VO with transmit enabled and audio out is set audio device

Audio waveforms disappear in Source Monitor when a clip is opened a second time

Using “Write” mode in Audio Track Mixer automation does not record keyframes

Workflow

Closed Captioning: MXF closed caption embedded files with AVI-I are not decoding properly / being recognized

Closed Captioning: With some files, captions will not display in the Source Monitor — captions also take a long time to load

Masks do not match the direct manipulation of the mask in the program window

Sync Settings : workspaces or keyboard shortcuts into Premiere CC 2015 that were created in CC 2014

Using Sync Settings once disables External Pref Management

Setting the Mood with Adobe Hue CC: Jason Levine

This post is part of a series where we challenge filmmakers to transform the atmosphere or feel of a short video clip, by using custom Looks created with Adobe Hue CC. Show us what you can do with the same footage by downloading it here.

Color and light have a huge impact on the art of filmmaking. They set the mood and tone (no pun intended!) of a scene, and guide our experience of the story. To illustrate this phenomenon, we caught up with Jason Levine (@Beatlejase) and asked him to use the all-new Adobe Hue CC to capture three custom Looks and apply them to the same set of video clips using Adobe Premiere Clip to see how creative looks alter the feel of a piece.

Here’s the original montage:

Look #1: Desert Sunrise

Look1_0188

When & Where did you capture this Look?

This look was captured in Las Vegas, Nevada at approximately 6:15am, in April 2015.

read more…

Color Science, Explained (Part 2)

In a previous post, we interviewed Lars Borg, Principal Color Scientist at Adobe, about the intriguing field of color science. In this post, Lars shares a few things that everyone working in video ought to know about color science.

We learned from Lars that “color” is actually an interplay of available light, colors, and the context in which we see them – all of which makes color subjective to a lot of different variables. We wanted to know, with such a deep topic, what ground rules can filmmakers and video enthusiasts derive from color science when it comes to basic color correction and color grading?

Looks are essential in cinematic storytelling

In the past, the film stock played an integral role in creating the “look” or character of a film. In the transition from film-based movie making to digital video, our relationship to color has shifted too. “The concept of the look is integral to film-based photography. You’d pick your film stock, say Fuji Velvia or Kodachrome, because the resulting look was pleasing to you. Some of the ‘look’ stems from the fact that the film’s spectral sensitivities don’t match the eye’s.” For example, some film stocks are overly sensitive to red, resulting in richer skin tones. Now, digital systems can emulate the look of film stocks.

FilmLook
read more…

Color Science, Explained (Part 1)

 

The theme of the 2015 release of Creative Cloud pro video tools is “Creativity just got a lot more colorful.” With color being such a hot topic at Adobe and beyond, we interviewed Lars Borg, Adobe’s resident color expert, to tell us more about color science and what filmmakers and video enthusiasts can take away from such a deep field.

Stay tuned for Part 2, where we’re share key color science takeaways for working with video.

Colors are a lot more than wavelengths on a spectrum. There’s a whole scientific field dedicated to the understanding of color, light, and ultimately, human perception: “Color science is based on how the eye reacts to color and light stimuli. It also includes how we ‘fool the eye’ – like that dress – based on what we are expecting to see, as well as how the eye adapts to different conditions, such as sunlight versus dark night,” says Lars Borg, Principal Color Scientist at Adobe. Color science is a cross-disciplinary field involving chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics, and psychology. It plays a key role in the design and production of most man-made materials—everything from textiles to digital imaging – as well as in defining properties of natural materials.

read more…

Morph Cut – Tips & Tricks for Best Results

Morph cut is a very powerful new Video Transition in Premiere Pro CC 2015. It enables users to create polished interviews by smoothing out distracting jump cuts without cross-dissolves or cut away footage. To get the most out of this new and exciting feature, here are some best practice tips as well as some advice on what to expect when using Morph Cut in the real world.

Similar to Adobe Photoshop’s Content-Aware Fill feature, users will need to be selective and understand when Morph Cut may or may not work in an ideal way. There are three main requirements to get it to work properly

  1. A “talking head” interview shot with a single subject
  2. A fixed shot (minimal camera movement may be OK)
  3. A static background (includes avoiding subtle lighting changes)
MorphCut_Waveform

Here is a good example of ideal framing for Morph Cut – Note that the head is large in the frame but not cropped, it’s evenly lit, and the hands are out of frame. Also notice that we’ve used the waveform to help show where there is a natural pause in speech and that the transition has been made asymmetrical so that it fits quite well into the speech gap.

read more…

 

Creatives all over the world are producing amazing work with Premiere Pro -

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Ask a Video Pro Webinars

Recent Sessions

A Front Row Seat - webcast presented by Jason Levine & special guest, Siân Fever LIVE from IBC Show 2015
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Using Character Animator - presented by Dan Ramirez
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Filmmaking from Scratch - presented by Dave Basulto
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My Filmmaking Toolkit - presented by Maxim Jago
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Think Like a Colorist, Work Like an Editor - presented by Robbie Carman
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The Editor's Journey - presented by Vashi Nedomansky
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What’s Next for Adobe Pro Video Tools - presented by Jason Levine from NAB Show 2015
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Managing Video Formats with Adobe Media Encoder - presented by Joost van der Hoeven
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The Filmmaking Workflow with Premiere Pro & Creative Cloud - presented by Christine Steele
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After Effects for (almost!) Everyone - presented by Joost van der Hoeven.
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Boost Your Career with a Killer Reel presented by Rod Harlan
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