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Results tagged “post production”

Student filmmakers embrace Adobe Creative Cloud

Filmmakers and Adobe Premiere Pro aficionados shine at the American Cinema Editors Student Competition

Each year, the American Cinema Editors (ACE) present the prestigious EDDIE Awards for the best-edited films in the business. To encourage young, up-and-coming editors, ACE also hosts an annual student film editing EDDIE competition. In 2015, two student editors, Aneesa Mahboob and Ben Stringfellow, used Adobe Premiere Pro to edit their films—and became two of the three competition finalists out of a pool of 100 students. Here, they talk about their experiences using Adobe video tools to create their standout film projects.Eddie-Awards-1

Adobe: Tell us how each of you got into filmmaking?

Mahboob: Growing up, I was always interested in the art of telling stories and loved experiencing how stories played out in video games, TV shows, and cartoons. I’ve always been interested in writing stories and I’m also musically inclined. The combination of those two things ended up bringing me to filmmaking. I attend film school at University of North Carolina School of the Arts where I’m able to immerse myself in all parts of filmmaking. I ended up falling in love with editing because there’s something solitary and powerful about it.

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Stringfellow: I took a digital film course in high school and found I really had a passion for filmmaking. I toured Elon University and it had an up-and-coming film program. I enrolled even though I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do. I immediately got involved with a student-run sketch comedy show and soon I was cutting a lot. I must have edited 10 to 15 sketches during my four years. I found that I really liked being in my own space and putting that final touch on a film. I also got involved in a lot of freelance work and student projects such as wedding and music videos.

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Adobe: Aneesa, how did you get involved in the ACE student editing competition?

Mahboob: I knew about ACE, but I wasn’t aware of the student competition that’s part of the EDDIE Awards until the school asked if I wanted to participate. I thought it would be fun, and I had nothing to lose. I was thrilled when, as a junior, I became one of the top three finalists.

Adobe: Ben, were you familiar with the competition?

Stringfellow: I knew that the ACE competition is very prestigious and film schools make it a priority to enter their most promising students. I took it upon myself to enter because I wanted to put myself to the test. I was in a meeting with someone I was working with when I got the call from ACE that I was a finalist in the student EDDIE competition. I think I nearly blacked out because I was so excited. It confirmed for me that editing is what I should be doing.

Adobe: Ben, can you tell us more about how the competition works?

Stringfellow: We receive raw, unedited film dailies and a script breakdown. Our job is to cut the film and add sound effects and music on our own. I read the script multiple times and watched all of the dailies to accurately capture the emotion of the actors. Eventually I started logging and organizing, then it was just a matter of assembling everything. I did a minor assembly, then did a finer edit followed by some revisions and refinements. I made the decision not to be flashy so I didn’t add any effects or color correction. Because it is an editing competition, they are really just looking at where you’re cutting.

Adobe: Aneesa, what were some of your worries going into the competition?

Mahboob: We were only given the dailies about a month before the project was due and there was very little guidance on what was expected. The only guidelines were that we had three scenes and each was a different genre, so it was a good opportunity to showcase several different techniques I had learned. Many of the projects I’ve worked on previously were drama based but not fast paced or suspenseful. With this project I created one pretty typical scene, one action sequence, and one that was almost a horror scene.

Adobe: Ben, did you have any concerns?

Stringfellow: I think the scariest part was the amount of freedom. You have to cut things as you think they should be cut. There are also no boundaries for music or sound effects. Sometimes not having guidelines can be fun. The most daunting part for me was figuring out how to distinguish myself from the rest creatively when we all had the same materials.

Adobe: Why did you both use Adobe Premiere Pro for editing your films?

Stringfellow: At the beginning of 2013, Elon University got Adobe Creative Cloud, which included Adobe Premiere CC and all the other Adobe video apps. I used Premiere Pro as part of my internship during spring semester my junior year, and it’s been my primary app for editing ever since. Premiere Pro can handle almost any format from any camera—RED, Canon, and so on—whatever you need to work with. Color correction is so easy. I love the software’s general intuitiveness and Dynamic Link with Adobe After Effects CC. Adobe’s video workflow is really terrific, so I can spend less time overcoming technical issues and more time being creative.

Mahboob: I did all of the editing with Premiere Pro, although we were free to edit using whatever we wanted. We did learn how to use Avid in school, and I was still figuring out how to navigate it. But for our freshman and sophomore years, we concentrated on Premiere Pro, so I was very familiar with it. I’ve fallen in love with Premiere Pro because the user interface is easy enough that I can figure out how to do things on my own, and that’s very freeing and empowering.

Adobe: Ben, what did you think of the ACE event?

Stringfellow: It was pretty outrageous. I met famous film and TV editors including Richard Halsey, who edited Rocky. I even sat next to Richard Linklater, who directed Boyhood, among other things. We get to meet celebrities and attend the event at the Beverly Hilton, where they host the Golden Globes.

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Adobe: Aneesa, what was your experience and what’s next for you?

Mahboob: The awards ceremony was the same weekend that I was shooting my junior year film and I was supposed to be on set! Luckily I was able to find someone to fill in for me. It was the first time I’d been in the heart of Los Angeles for an extended period of time and that experience, as well as the awards ceremony itself, was very overwhelming. In addition to being named a finalist, I’ve had a lot of support from the entire campus and I’ve even become a bit of a role model now at school.

I’m currently looking for internship opportunities, hopefully in the Washington, D.C. area so I can be close to home. When I graduate, I’d like to edit a music video, television episode, and video game scene at least once. I want to try everything this career has to offer.

Adobe: Ben, what are your future plans?

Stringfellow: I recently completed a wedding video and a country music video. I am also working on a dance video with some Elon alumni. After that, I plan to start work on a short film. Then, I really want to direct and write something of my own. Now that I’ve graduated, I’m pursuing post production work in Los Angeles.

 

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Filmmaking from Scratch: The Amazing Journey of Dave Basulto

Driven by a love of storytelling and a fearless nature, filmmaker Dave Basulto’s packed career has taken him from Wall Street to Hollywood and beyond. A California boy, he started out working as a stockbroker back in the 80’s with an office on the 65th floor of the World Trade Center. Living and working in New York City was an adventure and the money was good, but when someone called to see if he wanted to be an extra in Rocky V, his curiosity got the better of him.

“I had absolutely no idea what I was getting into,” Basulto recalls, “but as soon as I heard the word ‘Rocky,’ I just had to give it a try.” It was his first time on a film set and he loved the feeling of being around actors and the crew so much that he soon decided to drop everything and become an actor full-time. So, to the great chagrin of his mother, he packed his belongings and headed west for Hollywood and a great future. He refers to that decision as “a leap of faith.” There would be more of them.

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“I didn’t make it big, but I made a decent living for 10 years” he says. “On the TV front I had appearances in Cheers, Mad About You, News Radio. In films I got to work alongside stars like Jon Voight, Steven Seagal, and many others. One of my favorite roles was in American History X where I tormented Edward Norton’s character in jail.”

 

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VidCon 2015 “For people who love online video”

“Online video has become a massive cultural force, launching careers and communities and creations of all sort. VidCon exists as the largest gathering of people who love and are a part of this new culture.”

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Setting the Mood with Adobe Hue CC: Jason Levine

This post is part of a series where we challenge filmmakers to transform the atmosphere or feel of a short video clip, by using custom Looks created with Adobe Hue CC. Show us what you can do with the same footage by downloading it here.

Color and light have a huge impact on the art of filmmaking. They set the mood and tone (no pun intended!) of a scene, and guide our experience of the story. To illustrate this phenomenon, we caught up with Jason Levine (@Beatlejase) and asked him to use the all-new Adobe Hue CC to capture three custom Looks and apply them to the same set of video clips using Adobe Premiere Clip to see how creative looks alter the feel of a piece.

Here’s the original montage:

Look #1: Desert Sunrise

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When & Where did you capture this Look?

This look was captured in Las Vegas, Nevada at approximately 6:15am, in April 2015.

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The making of “25 Years of Photoshop”

Adobe collaborates with agencies to produce stunning video using Adobe Creative Cloud

Adobe Photoshop is synonymous with creativity, which is why it made perfect sense to celebrate its 25th anniversary with a standout commercial of exceptional artistry. Goodby Silverstein & Partners (GS&P) produced and Rock Paper Scissors edited the fantastic spot—an animated montage of the work of artists from all over the world. It aired during the 2015 Oscars and has been watched nearly 1.9 million times on YouTube. The commercial won two AICP awards, a D&AD Graphite Pencil, two Cannes Cyber Lions, and continues to receive rave reviews from creative professionals and dreamers worldwide.

Contributors to the project included Alex Amado, Senior Director, Creative & Media at Adobe; Timothy Plain, Producer and Tod Puckett, Director of Broadcast Production of GS&P; and Video Editor Grant Surmi of Rock Paper Scissors, who all enjoyed working on this fast paced, captivating commercial created with Adobe Creative Cloud.

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Adobe: Why did Adobe want to make a 25th anniversary spot for Photoshop?

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Color Science, Explained (Part 2)

In a previous post, we interviewed Lars Borg, Principal Color Scientist at Adobe, about the intriguing field of color science. In this post, Lars shares a few things that everyone working in video ought to know about color science.

We learned from Lars that “color” is actually an interplay of available light, colors, and the context in which we see them – all of which makes color subjective to a lot of different variables. We wanted to know, with such a deep topic, what ground rules can filmmakers and video enthusiasts derive from color science when it comes to basic color correction and color grading?

Looks are essential in cinematic storytelling

In the past, the film stock played an integral role in creating the “look” or character of a film. In the transition from film-based movie making to digital video, our relationship to color has shifted too. “The concept of the look is integral to film-based photography. You’d pick your film stock, say Fuji Velvia or Kodachrome, because the resulting look was pleasing to you. Some of the ‘look’ stems from the fact that the film’s spectral sensitivities don’t match the eye’s.” For example, some film stocks are overly sensitive to red, resulting in richer skin tones. Now, digital systems can emulate the look of film stocks.

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Morph Cut – Tips & Tricks for Best Results

Morph cut is a very powerful new Video Transition in Premiere Pro CC 2015. It enables users to create polished interviews by smoothing out distracting jump cuts without cross-dissolves or cut away footage. To get the most out of this new and exciting feature, here are some best practice tips as well as some advice on what to expect when using Morph Cut in the real world.

Similar to Adobe Photoshop’s Content-Aware Fill feature, users will need to be selective and understand when Morph Cut may or may not work in an ideal way. There are three main requirements to get it to work properly

  1. A “talking head” interview shot with a single subject
  2. A fixed shot (minimal camera movement may be OK)
  3. A static background (includes avoiding subtle lighting changes)
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Here is a good example of ideal framing for Morph Cut – Note that the head is large in the frame but not cropped, it’s evenly lit, and the hands are out of frame. Also notice that we’ve used the waveform to help show where there is a natural pause in speech and that the transition has been made asymmetrical so that it fits quite well into the speech gap.

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COLLINS redefines the music video.

New York­ based agency fuses music, story, and technology into a psychedelic immersive app using Adobe Creative Cloud for teams and Google Cloud Platform.

Rapper Azealia Banks’ latest single “Wallace” is as inventive as her music and her entire persona. To showcase this innovation, the brand agency COLLINS created an immersive app that lets viewers become part of the video and control Azealia’s movements. Custom software designed by COLLINS tracks the viewer’s facial movements through their web camera, allowing Azealia’s audience to physically interact with the web­based video. About halfway through, the viewer appears in the video behind Azealia. Fans are embracing the experience in droves and posting hundreds of “selfies” of their co­appearances with Banks on social media.

Here, we talk with Director Nick Ace and Director of Experience Design Brett Renfer, both of  COLLINS, about their roles in creating the unique app and music video experience, with help from Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

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Adobe: Tell us more about your backgrounds.

Renfer: I studied at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit and then went on to work at Rockwell Group, an architecture and design firm. As the Director of Experience Design at COLLINS, I have done everything from responsive architecture to interactive music videos. My job here is to create anything that one or more persons can experience in an immersive way. I love the convergence of physical and digital worlds and learning how people interact when the two come together.

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Senior Post—Closing The Gap between Post and Production Work

From pitches to prototypes… The applications in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams support every stage of Senior Post’s award-winning projects.

Feathered jackets. Dancing presidents. And of course the ubiquitous tongue. In an electrifying five-minute video for the music video site VEVO, Miley Cyrus connects to audiences by introducing the people and ideas that make her live performances uniquely Miley.

For VEVO, this rare behind-the-scenes look needed to be as dynamic and eye-catching as Miley’s performances. The content channel turned to long-time collaborator, creative studio Senior Post, to give the video the energy it needed. The studio combined music, interviews, and backstage footage to create Miley Cyrus Bangerz (VEVO Tour Exposed). It earned the team a 2014 CLIO Award. With high energy and a keen eye for details, this award-winning video is typical of the work from Senior Post.

Expanding creative focus

Josh Senior began Senior Post with a simple goal: to raise the bar on digital services by providing clients with top-quality video editing and post-production work. Although the Brooklyn-based studio initially focused on the editorial side of video production, Senior Post quickly expanded into finishing services that deliver the crisp images and perfectly synced sound that turn a great video into an extraordinary one.

“We got our start working with brands like VEVO and VICE on music-related content and online videos,” says Senior. “We spent our first few years improving our work and making a name for ourselves for high-quality execution. Winning the CLIO Award was a real game changer, opening the door for production opportunities. We’re now able to offer a one-stop solution for branded content—handling production, editing, and finishing under one roof.”

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Working with a team

As the studio’s workload grew and diversified, so did its workforce. The studio works with half a dozen people on an average week, with about fifteen people on set for a shoot. Rapidly scaling the team up and down gives Senior Post the ability to take on a large variety of work across a broad range of budgets.

“We never wanted to price ourselves out of opportunities, and the dynamic flexibility of our business model is the perfect parallel for Creative Cloud,” notes Senior. “We use Creative Cloud throughout our creative process, but our numbers have been growing dramatically,” says Senior. “Just a few years ago, we used two workstations. Now we have five. Adobe Creative Cloud for teams was the next step for our growing business.”

With Creative Cloud for teams, Senior can assign and reassign licenses to freelancers working anywhere. Working on the same Creative Cloud apps and versions keeps collaboration running smoothly. Team members can share assets quickly and easily, no matter where they’re located.

Since the Adobe apps work together seamlessly, different elements of a project can be worked on simultaneously and pulled together for a faster production workflow. Editors cut video in Adobe Premiere Pro CC while sound editors mix the audio track in Adobe Audition CC. Animators import assets created in Adobe Photoshop CC into Adobe After Effects CC to create smooth animations.

“Importing a Photoshop or After Effects file into Premiere Pro that automatically updates as we make changes in the original programs makes combining different types of media much simpler and more efficient,” says Joanna Naugle, Senior Post Lead Editor. “With Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, I can support my teams from anywhere to keep workflows running smoothly and deliver the best content for our customers,” adds Senior.

Creative workflows

Adobe Creative Cloud for teams apps contribute to every stage of a project, starting from pitches and prototypes. Working with Adobe InDesign CC, Senior can pull together assets created in any Adobe app to develop an engaging pitch. The smooth workflows and easy integration with Adobe apps enables Senior to use Premiere Pro CC to add assets onto a timeline and quickly prototype video projects.

“Power windows in Premiere Pro CC enable us to quickly set looks and provide an idea of how the story will evolve in a visual way,” says Senior. “Being able to serve clients with moving prototypes helps us better convey our ideas compared to static storyboards. We can deliver more persuasive client presentations that accurately reflect our creative vision.”

Senior is looking at more ways to use mobile apps, such as Adobe Shape CC or Adobe Premiere Clip, to expand creative workflows. “I used Adobe Color CC to capture the color palette of a client’s office and bring that back into the project,” says Senior. “It was an amazing way to tie the video to the client’s brand. I love how the Adobe Creative Cloud mobile apps open up new possibilities for us creatively.”

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Delivering original video

After spending years polishing skills on branded content, Senior Post now has the time and opportunity to focus on original works. “Long-form content, by nature, tends to involve very busy periods followed by lulls in activity,” says Senior. “This cycle is a huge asset for us, as we can use the downtime to work on our own projects.”

From narrative comedies like Eavesdropping to the documentary series Life on Mars, Senior Post’s original material has been as varied as its branded work. The studio also encourages its employees to pursue their own ideas, using company resources to help bring dream projects to life. “By reinvesting in our talent, we’re keeping employees engaged and building a team of highly experienced and creative staff,” says Senior. Projects are often featured on Instagram and Facebook, enabling the studio to control distribution to highly engaged audiences.

Looking to the future

For Senior Post, the next big project on the horizon involves a narrative feature entitled 5 Doctors. The studio will handle digital imaging and related workflows, which will require deep involvement throughout the filming process.

The studio is also working with VICE’s creative agency, Virtue Worldwide, to produce a series of pre-roll ad spots for SUBWAY, providing full production and post to a top tier client. By leveraging collaboration through Creative Cloud for teams to its fullest, Senior Post was able to deliver eight pieces of content back to Virtue Worldwide within two days.

“We’re closing the gap between post and production work,” says Senior. “Adobe Creative Cloud for teams is an essential piece to help us increase collaboration while keeping workflows efficient. The apps are allowing us to align more closely with the agencies that engage us, and present a unified package to our clients. Having that extra time to refine stories and beats really makes everything a lot more polished by the time clients’ lay eyes on the work.”

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Harvey brothers produce stunning videos for Seattle Seahawks

Video production pros gain clients and recognition for amazing video production work using Adobe Creative Cloud and Premiere Pro CC

For twin brothers Phillip and Kevin Harvey, having grown up in Moscow, Idaho, it was hard to imagine they would one day be standing on top of the Space Needle in Seattle, Washington with Dave Matthews, or in the middle of CenturyLink Field during the NFC Championship celebrations. The path that led them there was paved with both luck and hard work.

After moving to Seattle and starting their own video production company, the two were tapped by the Seattle Seahawks to make videos chronicling the run up to Super Bowl XLIX. Combining creativity and the video applications in Adobe Creative Cloud, the resulting videos successfully channeled the excitement that gripped the northwest.

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Adobe: Tell us about your background and how you got into the video production business.

Phillip Harvey: My brother actually moved to Seattle 10 years ago to study acting. He and some fellow students had the idea to start filming videos as a platform for their acting. That’s when I decided to make the move as well, and I joined the group. I wasn’t very interested in being in front of the camera, so I concentrated more on writing and shooting at the time.

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Ask a Video Pro Webinars

What’s Next for Adobe Pro Video Tools - webcast presented by Jason Levine from NAB Show 2015

Thursday, April 16th | 11amPT
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Recent Sessions

Managing Video Formats with Adobe Media Encoder - presented by Joost van der Hoeven
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The Filmmaking Workflow with Premiere Pro & Creative Cloud - presented by Christine Steele
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Secrets to Running a Great Wedding Video Business - presented by Summeyah & Jawad Mir
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Blurring the Line Between Indie & Hollywood - a panel discussion featuring Rob Legato, Dave Ginsberg, Kyle Alvarez & Meagan Keane at Sundance Film Festival 2015.
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After Effects for (almost!) Everyone - presented by Joost van der Hoeven.
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Bring Color Grading to Your Editorial Workflow - presented by Patrick Palmer.
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LOG and RAW Workflow & Adobe Tools presented by Robbie Carman
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Boost Your Career with a Killer Reel presented by Rod Harlan
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