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Results tagged “Prelude”

Showcasing breathtaking mountains and raw athleticism

Epic freesking and snowboarding tour improves video workflow and productivity with Adobe Creative Cloud

The Freeride World Tour by The North Face (FWT) is the top big mountain freeskiing and snowboarding tour in the world. FWT doesn’t deal with artificial jumps and groomed slopes. Athletes use the entire slope, including overhangs and cliff-faces, choosing their own path down the mountain while demonstrating control and technique through fluid movements and jumps. The mountains don’t just up the action for the athletes; they also challenge the event photographers and cinematographers. David Arnaud, the producer who has been in charge of the television and video production on FWT since 2009, along with Editor Aurelie Monod and a crew of up to 35 people, work in extremely challenging conditions to bring the excitement of FWT to viewers.

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Modern and daring filmmaking

Ambitious French filmmakers produce their first genre feature film using Adobe Creative Cloud and Adobe Premiere Pro CC

The zombie movie genre, which dates back as far as the 1930s, includes dozens of films from comedies to true horror classics. Insolence Productions, created by Anaïs Bertrand in 2009, combines both comedy and horror in a new film for zombie movie enthusiasts, Super Z. After producing nine award-winning short films, this is the first feature from Insolence Productions. The movie was filmed in the heart of France in September 2013 and directed by Julien Arnaud Tabarly Volte. Producer Laura Townsend worked with Co-producer Emmanuel Pampuri and Paul Ferré, the film’s talented editor, to create the film using an Adobe video workflow.

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Adobe: How did you get started in the movie industry?

Pampuri: I started as cameraman in 1991 then worked on movie sets with montage, production, and finally in post production. For many years, I worked on the sets of live performances, helping capture the performing arts on video. I started my company, Les Machineurs, in 2006. We specialize mostly in post-production work but also cover the entire filmmaking workflow, from shooting to post production. We provide equipment and expertise, as well as the final output.
Townsend: I’ve been involved in the movie industry for the past eight years. I started as a production assistant then quickly moved up to director of production on short films and then full-length feature films. I started a company three years ago called La Ruche Production and produced Super Z in collaboration with Insolence Productions as a freelancer. I’ve worked with a multitude of production companies and studios on regional full-length feature films and I’m hoping to someday collaborate with U.S. filmmakers.

Adobe: What was your role with the film Super Z?

Pampuri: My role with Super Z is a bit complicated. I’m the workflow glue. I was initially the one that proposed the collaboration and brought the teams together for the realization of this motion picture. My role covered every aspect of the project from shooting to post production, including technical decisions such as equipment and software choices. I was the main coordinator for this film. Les Machineurs was also the digital lab for the film and, being the principle, I had my hands in many different aspects of its realization.
Townsend: I am a producer on the film. I met the directors about 15 years ago and was brought in by the group at Insolence Productions. I shared my role with the company’s founder Anaïs Bertrand. Over the years, I’ve collaborated with the directors and the technical team on a multitude of projects.

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Adobe: Have you personally used Adobe Premier Pro CC?

Pampuri: I used Adobe Premiere Pro CC for post-production work on Super Z. I’m a member of the Adobe influencer program and use Premiere Pro on a regular basis with most projects I work on.

Adobe: Tell us about Super Z.

Townsend: It’s a movie that provoked a high level of interest among industry professionals, actors, and comedians. Given the unusual and unexpected nature of its horror/comedy premise, the projects was a challenge that many of us were eager to take on. For the same reasons, getting the financial support necessary to bring our ideas to life was a big challenge especially here in France. We had to seek help from the local film community, numerous private contributors, and the web, where we raised close to 13,000 Euros on Ulule.com.

A solid partnership with Adobe also helped us tremendously along the way. We ended up launching the project on a relatively small budget and are very happy with how things turned out thanks to Adobe Creative Cloud applications, especially Premiere Pro CC.

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Adobe: How did Adobe Creative Cloud applications help?

Pampuri: The choice to go with Premiere Pro was an easy one to make. The tool made all our lives much easier. The footage was shot with RED cameras so we needed a tool that could support raw R3D file formats and allow us to rapidly upload and work with the files without wasting time formatting or dealing with compatibility issues. This aspect alone was reason enough for us to go with Premiere Pro.

Overall, there were many special effects in the film. We had a separate agency creating the effects and it was my job to help ensure a seamless workflow between all the teams involved. They used After Effects for simple 2D animations. We were able to gather elements from all different sources and easily integrate them into Premiere Pro without wasting any time dealing with compatibly or reformatting issues. Synergy, flexibility, simplicity, and efficiency were the identifiable benefits behind our choice of Adobe Creative Cloud.

Ferré: In the past I used Final Cut Pro and hadn’t used Premiere Pro for a project of this magnitude. With this film, I had Premiere Pro at my disposal and I was impressed with the overall speed of execution. We didn’t have to wait long hours for rendering and were able to use our raw R3D files directly from the cameras. The software itself was very intuitive and user-friendly. Compared to other solutions I’ve used in the past I can say it is very robust and fast. I greatly appreciated how much valuable time we were able to save thanks to Adobe Premiere Pro.

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Adobe: Did you discover any new features while using Premiere Pro for the film?

Ferré: Real-time rendering was quite a pleasant surprise for me. When I made edits, I was able to export right away and see the result without having to wait a long time for rendering or reformatting. We can apply effects and filters and visualize the result in real time instead of waiting for hours.

Adobe: Were there any challenges?

Pampuri: At the beginning we had issues finding the right computers along with the appropriate hardware add-ons to tackle such a colossal project. Due to our limited budget, we were using an outdated Mac Pro computer that didn’t allow us to take full advantage of all the features that came with the software. Since we had budget restrictions, we struggled a bit getting the right equipment to do the job. There were issues with audio cards and memory capacity. After we upgraded the equipment and had the right technical infrastructure, everything worked well and we were able to make up for lost time.

Adobe: Can you see yourselves using Adobe video tools in the future?

Pampuri: Les Machineurs is already standardizing on Adobe Creative Cloud. Whether it’s Premiere Pro, After Effects, or Prelude, we appreciate the robustness and efficiency of this set of tools.
Townsend: My team and I were truly impressed with the performance of Adobe Premiere Pro CC. I plan on using it in post-production environments in the future project. My company already uses Adobe Audition for music videos and sound treatment.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

Turning the spotlight on modernized production

British network transforms production with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise

For more than 50 years, ITV has delivered beloved and successful programming to households throughout the United Kingdom. Today, ITV is probably best known for its flagship serial dramas, Coronation Street and Emmerdale, both of which have been on the air for thousands of episodes and found popularity with audiences around the world. Decades of experience with the fast turnaround of these dramas has underlined the importance of efficient production and streamlined workflows. In his upcoming talk at IBC, Martyn Suker, head of production innovation for ITV, will share some of his secrets to establishing superior production workflows.

Adobe: Tell us about what you do at ITV.

Suker: My main focus is to set and continuously review the digital production strategies across ITV Studios. I also support and advise teams for all our productions. Sometimes that means helping a show find the right facilities, developing a new workflow, or helping them maximize the creative opportunities of emerging technologies or techniques, at other times it can mean advising on standard camera policies.

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Adobe: What is the production modernization program?

Suker: We’re always looking for ways to improve processes and the way that we work. Right now, our main focus is on how we can simplify our production workflows. It’s not just about swapping out a few pieces of software or hardware here and there. It’s an overarching change program looking at roles and responsibilities, best practices, and the entire production culture. Ultimately, we’re looking to save time and money during production so that we can shift more value on screen.

Adobe: What were you looking for in a solution?

Suker: We were definitely looking for an end-to-end solution. Having said that, when most people speak of an end-to-end approach, they are usually just referring to the post-production process. We look at the entire production process, starting from the early stages of commissioning and ending at the final delivery and archival. Importantly we want to track production information throughout the production lifecycle and wherever possible, automate mundane tasks. It’s about providing a better experience for users all round.

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Adobe: How does Adobe Creative Cloud fit in to the production workflow?

Suker: We’ve been using Adobe Story CC Plus on Coronation Street and Emmerdale for quite some time. It’s a big operation; both shows have three or four crews working simultaneously everyday for 50 weeks a year. With such a fast turnaround they need to shoot out of order, so Story plays an incredibly important role in helping us keep track of schedules and scripts.

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Designers have also been using Adobe After Effects and Photoshop for quite some time, but the two most recent additions to our workflow have been Adobe Prelude CC and Adobe Premiere Pro CC. By adopting an all Adobe workflow it’s possible to take advantage of the built-in integrations, allowing us to work more quickly and effectively.

Adobe: How does MioEverywhere support the production workflow?

Suker: MioEverywhere from Nativ.tv is a highly configurable production information and workflow management system that’s helped us take our workflow to a new level. We used it to build panels in Prelude and Premiere Pro that help simplify data and media management within that part of the process. One of the key advantages of Creative Cloud is the ability to do that type of integration, quickly and simply.

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Adobe: How did you decide that the Adobe workflow was right for ITV?

Suker: We want productions to have the ability to choose the right tool for the job. We ran a pilot using Creative Cloud and MioEverywhere to produce a recent drama documentary. It was about ensuring we had the right approach, functionality and capabilities. There are always issues when you introduce something new, but you only discover those issues when you put it into a real environment—an actual production that’s got to meet deadlines and provide quality.

Adobe Prelude worked very smoothly by enabling the production team to log and ingest footage quickly and efficiently. The editor, like most of our editors at ITV, had never worked with Premiere Pro before and it was a complicated edit involving drama reconstructions mixed with archive footage. We proved there were no more issues than you would normally expect with such a complex piece of editing, indeed some things were better.

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Adobe: What were the results of the pilot?

Suker: Prelude was particularly effective in providing huge time savings during ingest. Overall the benefits were significant and as a result we were able to move investment to on-screen talent. Having a recognizable high-profile leading actor may convince the network to give us a better slot in the schedule, pulling in a bigger audience and in turn, driving more revenue.

Moreover, it proved Adobe does not prevent us from working with other tools. For the pilot program, the producer wanted to work with a particular colorist and dubbing mixer. We just exported the masters, handed them over to the post-production house, re-imported the grade and dub and then finished the program in Premiere Pro. Even though it’s possible to handle everything within the Adobe workflow, we proved it’s also flexible enough to give production teams those options.

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Adobe: Why did you get an enterprise term license agreement for Adobe Creative Cloud?

Suker: We can see opportunities to use Creative Cloud across the company, both in production and with our development teams. We want choice and to encourage staff to experiment with different software within Creative Cloud to provide further benefit. For example, one of our production labels is using Creative Cloud to create content for all its YouTube channels. Using the full range of toolsets within the suite is saving a lot of time and indirectly of course, money.

Adobe: What are the next steps for ITV?

Suker: We got approval for funding based on the success of the pilot, so now we’re ironing out all the details in terms of the best configurations, implementing our learning from the pilot and procuring the right infrastructure to support initial roll-out across the company.

We’re also working closely with production, development teams and editors to get them used to working with Prelude and Premiere Pro. We’re really excited about its possibilities and the opportunities that for example, Adobe Anywhere might also offer in future.

Martyn Suker, Head of Production Innovation at ITV Studios, will be presenting in the Adobe stand at IBC 2014 on Saturday, Sept. 13th at 5:00pm, Sunday, Sept. 14th at 5:00pm, and Monday, Sept. 15th at 5:00pm.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

Red Bull Media House gives wings to video innovation

Multi-platform media company produces premium sports, culture, and lifestyle content with help from Creative Cloud

From its start selling energy drinks, Red Bull has expanded into an international brand with streaming video through Red Bull TV, the Red Bull Records independent music label, and sponsorship of dozens of athletes, teams, and events. For the past seven years, Red Bull Media House, a subsidiary of Red Bull, has overseen all of the company’s communications and media, taking Red Bull to the next level as a full-fledged lifestyle brand. Andreas Gall, the chief technology officer at Red Bull Media House, gives wings to emotional content that connects people with the international Red Bull brand.

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Adobe: How did Red Bull Media House get started?

Gall: About seven years ago, I met with the CEO of Red Bull, Dietrich Mateschitz, and he asked me to be part of Red Bull Media House. The idea was that we would pull together the print, video, audio, and digital projects across Red Bull and concentrate all of that fantastic creative energy in one location. I have a lot of experience in broadcast media, so I understand how to bring stories to life. From the way I see it, my job is to keep on top of technology and technological strategies to push the envelope on how we explore people, stories, and ideas.

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Mark Mathews in Sydney – 2014

Adobe: What does Red Bull Media House do?

Gall: We handle all of the communications for the entire Red Bull family of companies. That includes especially coverage of Red Bull’s events, from sports to music and more. We’re much more than just TV commercials and magazine ads. We produce exciting short and feature-length films, engaging video magazines, and even deliver live coverage of international events through Red Bull TV. If you look at the Red Bull Content Pool, we have a massive online archive of more than 120,000 assets produced by Red Bull Media House—and we’re adding new content every day.

Much of our content covers high-action sports, which has been the core of the Red Bull DNA for years. We’re always looking for new ways to find really emotional content and bring our audiences closer to the athletes’ experiences.

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Red Bull BMX Hero Tour 2014 UK

Adobe: Why did you make the switch to Adobe Creative Cloud?

Gall: If there’s anything we know at Red Bull, it’s the importance of pushing the limits. We have a lot of great ideas that we’d love to see—like enhanced visualizations and biometrics—that don’t have a solid technological answer yet. That’s why it was much less important for us to find a system that worked for where we are now, and more important to find a motivated partner who was willing to work with us to change the media world.

I really like how open Adobe is to exploring with us. Adobe comes from a very creative background, so the product development teams are very interested in ideas and concepts that will lead to new creative expressions. We’ve had meetings with Adobe about working with Premiere Pro and XMP, and we’re starting to paint a picture of how we want to evolve together.

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Red Bull Battle of the Sund 2014 Sweden

Adobe: What Adobe applications are you using?

Gall: We’ve had people working with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe After Effects for years, but the biggest change has been our switch to Adobe Premiere Pro CC. It’s going to be central to the architecture that we’re planning with fast edits and fast production. Once we’re fully switched over, we’ll standardize on Adobe Prelude CC to streamline production even further. With everything going through Prelude, we’ll reduce ingest and make edits considerably faster.

We’re starting to dive into the rest of the applications available in Creative Cloud as well. There’s been a lot of interest in Adobe Story CC and Adobe Anywhere to encourage creative collaboration around the globe.

Adobe: What is the future for Red Bull Media House?

Gall: We’ve got some ideas for how we want to move forward. For example, we think it would be fantastic if we could really connect athletes with fans by giving athletes the ability to create and upload their own media. This is just one of many ideas we’re exploring, and Adobe is with us every step of the way.

Check out the video interview with Andreas (Andi) Gall of Red Bull Media House:

 

 

 

Creating daily dramas for German TV

Production company standardizes on an Adobe Creative Cloud workflow to efficiently deliver up to 28 TV episodes per week

For more than 20 years, UFA SERIAL DRAMA has produced some of the most popular serial dramas in Germany. Classic shows such as Good Times, Bad Times (Gute Zeiten, Schlechte Zeiten) and Among Us(Unter Uns) have been on the air for more than 4,000 episodes each. UFA SERIAL DRAMA currently runs five daily shows and can produce up to 28 episodes in a week; for this team efficiency is key. Post-production supervisor Marc Schwellenbach works with the post-production teams to continually refine and optimize the standard workflows to be as quick and smart as possible.

Adobe: Tell us about the shows you produce through UFA SERIAL DRAMA.

Schwellenbach: We produce five unique daily serial dramas, which translates to 800 minutes of material every week. Four of our shows run in Germany. In fact, the first series that we produced back in 1992,Good Times, Bad Times (Gute Zeiten, Schlechte Zeiten), was the first daily serial drama made for German television. It’s still on the air; we passed the 5,000 episode mark a few years ago. Even our “newest” series has been around for eight years and nearly 2,000 episodes. Our fifth show is actually a serial drama made for Hungarian audiences. It’s been running for 16 seasons, and it’s one of the top-rated shows in Hungary.

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Adobe: Why are production workflows so important to you?

Schwellenbach: We work on five shows that run five days a week with almost no breaks. To get all of the shows ready for air, we may produce up to 28 episodes a week. We need a rock-solid workflow to keep up the pace without compromising quality.

We have one big advantage on our side: experience. We’ve learned over the years to take the time to think through our workflows and look for ways to improve them. We take it a step further at UFA SERIAL DRAMA by standardizing about 90% of our workflow across productions. If one team comes up with a new process that helps them work faster and better, we can easily apply their innovations to other teams.

Adobe: How has your software changed over the years?

Schwellenbach: Several years ago, we switched from Avid to Final Cut Pro with the intention of becoming more flexible and speeding up workflows in post production. We worked with the Final Cut Pro workflow for a few years, but we felt that we still needed to move our editing process to the next level. By better integrating editing into the rest of the post-production workflow, we would improve turnaround speed for dailies and increase our overall speed and efficiency.

We recently started looking into Adobe Premiere Pro, and that’s when we realized the advantages that we could achieve using the integration between Adobe creative applications. With Adobe Creative Cloud, our workflow has not only gotten faster, but also tighter. We’re tying everything together into one smooth Adobe framework, which helps us get much more power and flexibility out of our daily workflows.

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Adobe: How important is the integration of Adobe tools to your workflows?

Schwellenbach: We had used Adobe After Effects and Adobe Photoshop before, but we had never considered how everything could work together in a bigger way. The integration among Creative Cloud applications not only changes how we work, but it encourages us to think about how all of the steps fit together to create the big picture.

Previously, our post-production artists would use After Effects to composite green screen shots and hand the finished shots over to the editors. The Dynamic Link between After Effects and Premiere Pro simplifies things so much. Even our editors who are not visual effects artists use After Effects to create their own graphics, or use templates we’ve created for graphical inserts, such as cell phone displays. They can then easily bring these effects into their Premiere Pro workflows. Edits and adjustments are practically seamless, as we no longer need to wait to export and import clips. We can be much more flexible while maintaining consistent information on the shots.

We also appreciate how Adobe software invites collaboration. We see lots of great third-party integrations, and with Adobe XMP and panel integration, we can even see ourselves leveraging metadata to develop our own integrations as we need them. The Adobe framework opens up whole new ways for us to speed up and simplify the workflow.

Adobe: What steps did you take to transition to Adobe Premiere Pro?

Schwellenbach: The key to a smooth transition is planning and communication. When you’re changing a key component of your workflow, you have to make sure that you think through everything beforehand. We didn’t want to even start the move until we were sure that our editors would be able to work faster right away. We talked with editors about the changes that they wanted to see and used their input to design the new workflow. Giving them ownership of the transition helped to assure them amidst the changes.

Trainers worked with our editors to help them feel comfortable with the new software and features. The entire transition felt very collaborative with Adobe, with everyone coming together for a common goal. As a result, our transition has been very smooth. Two teams have completely switched over to Premiere Pro with more still in the final training phases. Our editors are very pleased with the ease and functionality of Premiere Pro. Other departments have also successfully made the move to Creative Cloud.

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Adobe: Are there any other applications in Creative Cloud that you’re excited about?

Schwellenbach: Adobe Story CC Plus looks very interesting and has definitely caught the eye of our head writer. We’re currently syncing Word documents with our scheduling system, but Story will help us leverage metadata in the scripts so that we can see exactly what we need in post production.

Adobe Prelude CC is another piece that’s bound to be very useful. We’re always talking about logging on set, and Prelude and Live Logger will provide us a way to log information on set and preserve that metadata in Prelude for the post-production process. We’re already using a digital movie slate integrated into an iPad app, so I could see us using Prelude Live Logger right away.

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Adobe: What is the future for UFA SERIAL DRAMA?

Schwellenbach: We started using Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, but we’re switching to Creative Cloud for enterprise as our business continues to grow and use of the software expands. We’re also talking to other businesses in the UFA family. We’ve developed powerful workflows for our fast-paced production and along the way we’ve learned a lot about working with Adobe software. We look forward to sharing our knowledge and best practices with other UFA productions.

Download a free trial of Adobe Creative Cloud apps

MTV Music Group revolutionizes red carpet workflow

Workflow based on Adobe Prelude, Adobe Premiere Pro, and MediaSilo speeds content distribution to more outlets

With the CMT Music Awards airing tonight, we thought you might be interested in learning about how the production team behind these award shows captures, edits, and distributes all the great supplemental content. From red carpet interviews to show promos, the content needs to move quickly and reach a range of media outlets. Here, Jason Pattan, director of content production and technology management for MTV Music Group, talks about how that workflow has evolved to include Adobe Prelude, Adobe Premiere Pro, and MediaSilo, and has improved both accessibility and speed of delivery.

Adobe: What do you do as director of content production and technology management?

Pattan: My title is a really long winded way of saying I’m a workflow guy. I find different tools to make production life easier, try them out, and do real world testing before rolling them out to our general production community at MTV. My job is to figure out what works and what doesn’t before deciding to do a live show with it.

Adobe: How does MTV Music Group work with MediaSilo?

Pattan: We’ve been working with MediaSilo from a review and approval standpoint for a while. We were initially using it for basic production – getting rid of DVDs in our workflow, sending clips out, and getting people working in a collaborative space that they could access anywhere they have an internet connection. During this time, we noticed that there was a lot of functionality available through the MediaSilo platform that we could exploit for different types of production needs. We started wondering how we could work it into our live shows and big events.

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Adobe: Tell us about the live shows and “red carpet workflow” needs.

Pattan: Every quarter we have what we call tentpole events, which may be a large show such as the CMT Music Awards, Video Music Awards, the Woodies, VH1 Divas, and more. We know how to make the TV part of these productions, we’ve been doing it for years, but there is also a lot of ancillary production that goes into those shows and there’s a lot of work we can do to make it better. At all events we have press areas where people go after they’ve won the awards. We do basic interviews and our goal is to use the interviews internally and distribute to press outlets as well.

In the past, our team would shoot a red carpet event, run to the satellite truck to upload the footage, do some editing, and then have the feed grabbed by whoever needed it. This worked well for television programs and broadcasts, however it wasn’t effective in getting content on websites and social channels quickly. We also encountered problems with the uploads not reaching the correct satellite feeds and it could take more than three hours post-show to get two hours of footage uploaded. I’ve spent many nights sitting in a satellite truck at 2 a.m. trying to upload content.

Adobe: Why did you feel you needed to make changes to the red carpet workflow?

Pattan: Our red carpet workflow made sense 10 years ago when we were just sending content to media outlets with the right infrastructure to download it from the satellite. But today, we need to get content to blogs, websites, and other outlets that aren’t going to pay to download the content from the satellite.

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Adobe: How did you start to modify this workflow?

Pattan: We wanted to create a faster, more accessible solution. Our first step in this direction, was capturing the footage digitally, rather than on tape, and using firewire to transfer it to a laptop. We still fed it into the satellite and played it out, but we also posted a proxy on the MediaSilo site. We put the proxies up and embedded a MediaSilo player in the MTV press page. Our audiences could view the content, but they still had to be on the satellite if they wanted to grab the footage. It didn’t solve the problem, but it helped everyone start thinking about online distribution.

Adobe: What was the next step in modernizing your workflow?

Pattan: We still wanted a way to get content out to everyone in a way that didn’t involve sitting in a satellite truck at 2 a.m. Every year, we cover the MTVU Woodie Awards at SXSW. Everyone important to college music is there, and we interview all of them. From there, the team took the content from the file-based camera and fed it into a laptop. We then ingested the clips into Adobe Prelude and entered basic metadata that the team wants on MediaSilo and that also tied back to the internal asset management system. Interviews contained content for a variety of outlets, including press, internal teams, international audiences, etc. The need to deliver content for multiple stakeholders increased the need to move quickly and efficiently in a small mobile location.

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With Adobe Prelude, we were able to make subclips for each stakeholder, tag them appropriately, and transfer the footage to Adobe Premiere Pro. From there, it was edited and uploaded to MediaSilo using Adobe Media Encoder. The MediaSilo content distribution portal is where all of the press outlets and internal teams went to fetch the broadcast-quality content that was ready for distribution. In this way, all departments that weren’t being serviced were now able to secure content. By the time the last interview was done, the upload was completed within 20 minutes.

Adobe: What is the advantage of using Adobe Prelude?

Pattan: Adobe Prelude is a separate logging tool, accessed through Adobe Creative Cloud, with a simple interface for logging quickly without worrying about a full NLE. In Adobe Prelude, we can do a transcode on ingest, make the proxy, rename files, and move them to a different destination. In addition, when content is ingested in Adobe Prelude we can set up metadata profiles with pre-set values. Basic fields correspond to the clips being ingested. When creating subclips, Adobe Prelude gives an entire view of the asset and the subclip within the media file. It also makes it easier to add comments and organize. Once this is done, sending content to Adobe Premiere Pro is a more efficient process.

Adobe: How is the workflow between Adobe and MediaSilo?

Pattan: Adobe Media Encoder allows you to set up an FTP destination, which can be set to MediaSilo’s Amazon S3 account, where files are automatically imported along with embedded XMP. MediaSilo accepts direct FTP with embedded metadata, so it is extremely efficient. The XMP support in MediaSilo is key to this workflow. We can capture all metadata at the point of ingest in Prelude, and it is automatically carried through into MediaSilo through the automatic XMP import, and then published on the Portal. It’s great because it reduces the number of times the video and metadata has to be touched, and allows us to decide which items are published to the portal, as well as deciding what information is displayed on the portal, all from the point of ingest.

We used MediaSilo’s open API and portal sample to set up our own media portal for distribution and video sharing, internally and externally. In combination with Prelude and XMP support, the full end to end solution provides maximum efficiency from shooting the video to publishing it online.

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Adobe: What does this new workflow mean to outlets that want this content?

Pattan: This enhanced workflow enabled us to distribute a large amount of content in a very short amount of time. Anyone can access what they need simply by going to the portal and downloading the XDCAM footage. When a show is live to tape, which means it is airing a few days later, making the content available quickly means that people can begin cutting additional promos and do other work that will help drive viewers to the show. From a press perspective, content can appear on third party press sites hours after the show has aired. Previously these outlets would have only been able to include written content, or posted the video interviews days after the event.

What I like most is that I can show up at an event with just hand-luggage, instead of a satellite truck. Time from red carpet to air is minimized, and labor and manual steps are minimized. Plus, with the time I saved, I got to go to the SXSW after party!

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Adobe: What are the future plans?

Pattan: This new workflow has really changed the way we work with these events. What started out as a trial program has been proven and is now our standard workflow and the one we’ll be using for the CMT Music Awards. End users now expect to receive a link they can use to download content. We have plans to enhance the workflow with more search functionality and more detail.

Right now, the audience for the portal is primarily Viacom’s press outlet partners. That said, there are plans to grow this solution into a lightweight dailies solution, and to grow the audience of the portal to internal and external on-air distribution channels.

Learn more about Adobe Broadcast Solutions
Download a free trial of Adobe Creative Cloud
Learn more about MediaSilo’s video sharing and asset management platform

Prelude is now available standalone from adobe.com

Adobe Prelude™ CS6, software that streamlines ingesting and logging of file-based footage, is now available as a standalone product. Prelude CS6 was introduced in April 2012 as a part of the CS6 Master Collection, CS6 Production Premium and Creative Cloud. The reaction to Prelude has been very positive and many users wanted to purchase Prelude CS6 as a standalone application.

We are pleased to announce that Prelude CS6 is now available as a standalone product from Adobe.com for $399 for a perpetual license.

For more information on Prelude CS6, please visit: http://www.adobe.com/products/prelude.html
Videos to help you get started with Prelude CS6 can be viewed at http://tv.adobe.com/product/prelude/
You can download a trial of Prelude CS6 as a part CS6 Production Premium from http://www.adobe.com/products/creativesuite/production.html

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Tell us your story here

Ask a Video Pro Webinars

Bring Color Grading to Your Editorial Workflow - presented by Patrick Palmer. This session will introduce new features and the Direct Link integration between Premiere Pro & SpeedGrade CC.
Thursday November 20, 2014 |10am PST Register


Recent Sessions

LOG and RAW Workflow & Adobe Tools presented by Robbie Carman Replay

Boost Your Career with a Killer Reel presented by Rod Harlan Replay

What’s new in Creative Cloud for video - presented by Jason Levine LIVE from IBC Show 2014 Replay

Making the Switch to Adobe Premiere Pro - presented by Colin Smith Replay

From Photography to Videography: Filmmaking Tools in Creative Cloud - presented by Terry White Replay