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Results tagged “Prelude”

Stefan Weiss, fearless editor, hands-on educator

Self-taught editor and master educator transitions editors from Avid Media Composer to Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Stefan Weiss will be presenting the session “Streamlining Workflows by Switching from Avid to Adobe Premiere Pro CC” in the Adobe stand 7.G27 at IBC 2015 on Friday, Sept. 11th at 1:30 pm and 5:00 pm and Saturday, Sept. 12th at 2:00 pm.

When it comes to non-linear editing (NLE), Stefan Weiss is fearless. He’s worked in both film and broadcast television, and today enjoys editing documentaries on a variety of topics, from airplanes to reincarnation. Weiss balances his editing career with work as a trainer, focusing primarily on teaching others how to successfully switch from Avid Media Composer to Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Weiss is a member of the German Editors Guild (Bundesverband Filmschnitt Editor e.V.) and an Adobe Certified Instructor for Premiere Pro and Adobe Photoshop CC.


Adobe: How did you get your start?

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Freeride World Tour takes extreme athletes to breathtaking heights

Freeskiing and snowboarding tour delivers stunning video straight from the mountainsides of Alaska using Adobe Creative Cloud and Premiere Pro CC

Forget the artificial jumps and groomed slopes of typical skiing and snowboarding venues. Freeriding takes these winter sports back to their roots by challenging athletes to master an all-natural mountain ridge. Competitors start at the summit and must make their way to the finish line, but each athlete must decide on their own route down the mountain. The result is an exciting and unique run every time.

The Swatch Freeride World Tour (FWT) pits top freeskiers and snowboarders from around the world against some of the most beautiful, untouched peaks across Europe and North America. For the 2015 world tour, FWT took its riders somewhere completely new: the mountains near Haines, Alaska. A small town in the Alaska panhandle, Haines boasts undeveloped mountain ranges and Pacific weather conditions that make it an ideal venue for freeriding.

David Arnaud will be presenting the session “Delivering Event Coverage from Remote Destinations with Creative Cloud” in the Adobe stand 7.G27 at IBC 2015 on Monday, Sept. 14th at 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm and Tuesday, Sept. 15th at 11:00 am.

Credit: David Carlier/Freeride World Tour

Credit: David Carlier/Freeride World Tour

Taking up the Alaskan challenge

FWT produces up to 45 hours of raw footage for each stop in the tour, with deliverables ranging from short web clips to hour-long TV digests. Highlights must be released just hours later, giving editors little time to comb through footage and start producing videos. As a result, FWT sets up a video production tent right on the side of the mountain and using a combination of Adobe Prelude CC for logging and ingest and Premiere Pro CC for editing they are able to turn edits around quickly.

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“Gold Rush” perfects on-site production

Production team prepares footage for post four times faster using Adobe Creative Cloud

The production team of Discovery’s popular reality TV series, Gold Rush works in the Yukon Territory, a vast, sprawling and wild landscape in western Canada. There, they document the efforts of gritty miners hoping to strike it rich tapping gold placer deposits. The show has grown in popularity and scale since its debut.

Today, the on-site production team must prepare and send massive amounts of footage—from GoPro, Sony XDCAM, and other cameras—to the show’s post-production house in London. Colin Bowes, technical director, and Candice Bowers, digital imaging technician, know the challenges of this workflow, but say they are far outweighed by the rewards of the project. Recently, the team transitioned the entire workflow to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, helping to save time and drive space.


Adobe: Tell us more about Gold Rush.

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Harvey brothers produce stunning videos for Seattle Seahawks

Video production pros gain clients and recognition for amazing video production work using Adobe Creative Cloud and Premiere Pro CC

For twin brothers Phillip and Kevin Harvey, having grown up in Moscow, Idaho, it was hard to imagine they would one day be standing on top of the Space Needle in Seattle, Washington with Dave Matthews, or in the middle of CenturyLink Field during the NFC Championship celebrations. The path that led them there was paved with both luck and hard work.

After moving to Seattle and starting their own video production company, the two were tapped by the Seattle Seahawks to make videos chronicling the run up to Super Bowl XLIX. Combining creativity and the video applications in Adobe Creative Cloud, the resulting videos successfully channeled the excitement that gripped the northwest.

Harvey Brothers #121729-X3

Adobe: Tell us about your background and how you got into the video production business.

Phillip Harvey: My brother actually moved to Seattle 10 years ago to study acting. He and some fellow students had the idea to start filming videos as a platform for their acting. That’s when I decided to make the move as well, and I joined the group. I wasn’t very interested in being in front of the camera, so I concentrated more on writing and shooting at the time.

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Dado Valentic blurs the lines between still and motion imagery

Master colorist and artist bring magic to cinema and fashion with Adobe Creative Cloud

Dado Valentic worked as a producer and DJ before discovering the world of color grading 10 years ago. The industry looked very different at that time, with only four color grading studios in London, so getting started was challenging. He learned his craft in Los Angeles before moving to London and opening his own company called Mytherapy.

Today, he holds the status of master colorist and teaches other colorists specific methods for working with color and color science. Valentic has worked on 60 feature films, hundreds of commercials, and actively engages with fashion industry clients to develop everything from online brand videos to billboards. In addition to his London facility, he recently opened a small studio in New York City, both of which employ a full Adobe Creative Cloud workflow.

Dado Valentic will be presenting the session “The New Colour Workflow” in the Adobe stand 7.G27 at IBC 2015 on Sunday, Sept. 13th at 12:30 pm and 4:00 pm and Monday, Sept. 14th at 11:30 am

Dado Valentic

Adobe: What is your ultimate goal when you are commissioned to work on a film or commercial?

Valentic: I strive to understand the story the cinematographer is trying to tell and what mood needs to be created, and then develop color recipes that convey the story’s essence. This often means adopting a more analog way of rendering and displaying digital imagery so that it looks like film.

Adobe: You have a unique color aesthetic. Can you tell us more about it?

Valentic: I see my job as bringing the soul back to digital imagery. Digital images are crisp, detailed, and clean, but there is often an issue because viewers do not feel an emotional connection to the still or video images. There’s a whole group of people who prefer to listen to music on vinyl records or tapes or play music through old amplifiers because the music sounds richer. The need to experience more richness and depth is true of imagery, too.

Adobe: How are you using Adobe SpeedGrade CC in your work?

Valentic: SpeedGrade over the years has been our secret weapon and inspiration. We love the ability to create stylized color looks in SpeedGrade or Photoshop and bring them directly into the Premiere Pro timeline.

On set

Adobe: You are known mostly for color correction in cinematography, but have branched out into other areas that span both still and motion imagery. Can you tell us more?

Valentic: Everyone here at Mytherapy loves to explore the gray area between still imagery and cinematography. We have created many innovative cinemagraphs, or still photographs with subtle animated movement. Cinemagraphs are an emerging art form that really captures people’s attention. Imagine receiving an email from a brand that includes high-end still imagery with motion. It’s something unexpected that delights consumers. The disciplines of still and motion imagery are converging, and this trend really inspires us.

Adobe: What do you see happening as your clients expand into a variety of new digital media?

Valentic: Take a brand such as Vogue or GQ. They are now hosting videos online and attracting huge and exponentially growing numbers of viewers. Video content is expected today; it really isn’t optional. Brands also are repurposing assets into everything from cinemagraphs to 15-second Instagram videos, blogs, and billboards. Every visual or video has to have the same quality, look, and feel. That is where we come in. We serve clients at the crossroads of multiple media types, and it is a very exciting place to be.


Adobe: Tell us more about your workflow.

Valentic: We used to take images after a shoot and start working on them, but now our work starts on set. We start creating assets on the set, manage the look and color and feel on the spot, and match video to still imagery coloring and styles provided by photographers. We can typically provide a great-looking proof showing the look we’re striving for and obtain sign-off on the direction before we leave the shoot.

Adobe: How does Creative Cloud help with your ability to serve clients faster and more effectively?

Valentic: Creative Cloud helps us collaborate much better as a team. We do a job on set and upload it to Creative Cloud and the team in the studio can open it straightaway and start working. Especially in the fashion industry, we can work with clients who may be in New York, Paris, or London—they are typically not located in the same place. We can log in no matter where we are and get access to all of the settings and profiles of our color science, which is amazing.

Adobe: What are your mainstays in Creative Cloud?

Valentic: We use Photoshop, Premiere, and SpeedGrade day in and day out. After Effects and Photoshop are our main tools for creating cinemagraphs and we also use Prelude for data wrangling. The unsung hero for us is Media Encoder. The importance of compression for delivery of images and footage to the right devices cannot be overstated. We have to resize media files and make sure the color is perfect for viewing across a wide variety of outlets—all while maintaining metadata. Without Media Encoder, we literally would not be able to complete most of our work.

Adobe: Can you tell us more about your use of Premiere Pro?

Valentic: One of the main advantages for us is its integration with RED, our primary digital camera. It’s amazing that we can throw 6K RED files right onto the timeline without transcoding. After a client shoots a scene, we can play it and start working with it in real time on a laptop without stutters or delays. That capability was science fiction just a few years ago.

Adobe: How are you using Photoshop in your video workflow?

Valentic: We rely heavily on Photoshop to apply curves and select colors, then export files and load them onto the Premiere Pro timeline. I can apply the same transformations and color looks created in Photoshop to the world of motion imagery. The stills and motion files match exactly.

Adobe: Photoshop just celebrated its 25th anniversary. How has the software affected your work as a creative professional?

Valentic: Adobe has grown very large and could have easily fallen into the trap of being a company that does not need or want to innovate. But Adobe continues to deliver so many great breakthroughs that I typically take days off work to play with and learn new features that inspire and empower me. Adobe gives us mind-blowing features, especially in the case of Photoshop. New features in Photoshop make us want to explore. In fact, I don’t think the whole idea of the cinemagraph would have been realized without support for video in Photoshop.

Adobe: What cool projects have you worked on recently?

Valentic: We just launched a new TV screen for Panasonic in a campaign involving still and motion images. We created several motion loops for outdoor advertising, including content for a 30-meter-wide screen in a train station and large screens in airports. The challenge was interesting, because we had to create an immersive experience worthy of the screen we were promoting.

Additionally, our New York office is working on a new series of brand videos for Ralph Lauren that we’re enthusiastic about. We’re also working on an amazing feature film, Absolutely Anything, a British comedy/sci-fi that’s due out in May 2015. It is Robin Williams’ last performance, and the Monty Python team is behind it. This is a monumental film project for us, and we couldn’t be more excited.


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“Late Night with Seth Meyers” first late night comedy show to launch with Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Experienced editor helps design workflow for daily late night comedy show using Adobe Creative Cloud

After being introduced to the business by his father Dan Dome started working as a tape operator at a post-production house when he was 20 years old. By age 21 he was editing professionally at a time when computer-based editing was just coming on the scene. He learned all facets of editing, from creating promos and editing shows to cutting music videos and creating flashy highlight reels, by working with many clients, including Broadway Video, MTV, VH1, MSNBC, NBC, and NBC Sports.

When the HD buzz started he was working at NBC and landed a position as an editor on Late Night with Conan O’Brien and Saturday Night Live. After a stint in Los Angeles with Conan O’Brien, he returned to New York to launch Late Night with Seth Meyers, the first late night comedy show to launch using Adobe Premiere Pro CC.


Adobe: Tell us about your time working for NBC in the early 2000s.

Dome: It was an eye opening and fun time. I was lucky to have a diverse foundation to draw from to help with all of the facets of post production. I cut remote packages for Late Night with Conan O’Brien, put together pre-taped bits for Saturday Night Live, and did show composite work for both shows. Everyone wanted to work on those shows; I think having a diverse foundation to draw from set me apart from the rest of the pool of editors.

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MLB Network retools editing and post-production environment

MLB’s 24/7 cable TV network helps support 20% year-over-year growth in production demand with Adobe Creative Cloud workflow

MLB Network prides itself on delivering the most comprehensive coverage of baseball anywhere. Since its launch in 2009, the popularity of MLB Network has soared, spurring 20% year-over-year growth in production demand. In 2014, the network adopted all-new editing and post-production technologies to accommodate expansion, boost efficiency, and further raise the bar on quality.

Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise, particularly Adobe Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC, are central to the network’s success in staying on the cutting edge of TV production. The network’s ongoing transformation is largely driven by Tab Butler, Director of Media Management and Post-Production; Clive Hayes, Engineering and Post-Production manager; and Chris Schiro, Post-Production Technical Supervisor.

Adobe: What content does MLB Network produce?
Butler: We basically have two seasons, the regular season and off-season. In the regular season we have the job of recording all of the games and creating a highlights factory workflow that produces our content for shows like MLB TonightThe RundownIntentional TalkMLB Now, and Quick Pitch, which focus on the day’s activities and give a snapshot of what’s going on around the league.

In the off-season we are focused on headlines around free agency and longer-form programming. We have daily news shows such as Hot Stove, as well as High Heat with Christopher Russo and MLB Tonight, and we produce several countdown shows, individual player profiles, and other programming that goes behind the daily game and into more of the storytelling about baseball.

Adobe: Tell us about your new environment.
Butler: Our production needs and volume are growing so rapidly that we really wanted to build a foundation for the future. We are rolling out 50 high-performance Cisco UCS C-240 computers as editing stations—all equipped with NVIDIA cards for GPU acceleration. We are now at 38 HD editing stations and are expanding to 50 HD edit workstations, running the Adobe Creative Cloud suite of products.  We also will deploy 250 concurrent licenses for Adobe Premiere for desktop editing. We use a wide range of applications, including Premiere Pro, After Effects, Audition, Media Encoder, Prelude, Photoshop, and SpeedGrade.


The C-240 Workstations are Connected via Multi-Dyne KVM over a Single Dark Fiber as Edit Workstations. Running Adobe Creative Cloud for Content Editing.

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Fraktiv/Geebeebee, creativity times two

Small video production company delivers big value for variety of customers with Adobe Creative Cloud

London-based Fraktiv and geebeebee media are two separate parts of the same company. Fraktiv is the post production-specific arm, focusing on TV and film, and geebeebee media is the production arm, mostly for sports work. Oli da Costa is the founder and managing director and is active as an Adobe Community Professional. Ever since he founded the company in 1999, da Costa has relied on Adobe for his design and video applications, and today embraces a workflow across all digital content based on Adobe Creative Cloud.


Adobe: How did you first discover Adobe creative software?

da Costa: I actually studied aeronautical engineering at university and was researching the aerodynamics of Formula 1 racing cars. As part of my research, I needed to shoot videos of airflow simulation around cars from several angles. To do this, I put model cars in a water tunnel and released dye into the moving water to simulate how air would flow around them, as it was much clearer to see than in a wind tunnel. For that project, I taught myself how to edit video using Adobe Premiere Pro and how to use the pen tool in Adobe Photoshop to trace the paths.

Adobe: How did you move from engineering to operating your own production facilities?

da Costa: After university, I went decided to apply my engineering mind to learning software and ended up going into media production instead of engineering. I started freelancing and now I operate my own company. Fraktiv and Geebeebee are two halves of the same company. Or you could say one company with two brands.

My first client was the university where I had studied. They hired me to do design and production, digital publishing, and video promotions. I liked the variety of work because it gave me opportunities to learn new software.


Adobe: What Adobe Creative Cloud software do you use?

da Costa: Over the years, I’ve used a number of applications, from Adobe Dreamweaver, Photoshop, and InDesign to Adobe Premiere Pro and Illustrator for media production work. I still use Dreamweaver on a weekly basis for client web projects, and occasionally work in Adobe Flash Professional and Edge Animate, but video is now the mainstay of my work so I primarily use Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Photoshop.

To keep my skills up, I attend as many Adobe events as possible. I try to keep track of new software developments, such as Adobe Muse, Prelude, and SpeedGrade. Even though I don’t use these applications on a daily basis, I want to have the knowledge to use them if I need them.


Adobe: Do you have any favorite features?

da Costa: I probably use Dynamic Link between After Effects and Premiere Pro the most. I normally create work in After Effects and then bring it into Premiere Pro where I match it up with live action footage, adding titles, or motion graphics over video. The tight integration between After Effects and Premiere Pro drives my workflow while allowing me to be creative. I also use the masking and tracking tools in Premiere Pro to apply effects or color corrections to specific areas in a clip. Time remapping in Premiere Pro is useful for our action sports work at Geebeebee. I can time ramp video from regular speed to slow speed and back to regular. Adobe Premiere Pro is the only software that can do this in a creative, straightforward way.

Adobe: How do Adobe Creative Cloud applications help in your day-to-day work?

da Costa: I recently managed media output for a pair of major international biking events in France and Canada. All of the videographers and editors used Adobe software, so we were able to implement some great workflows, such as shared video assets, titling, and encoding presets. Because everyone was using the same files in Premiere Pro, we were able to establish a style and hard code it into the files so it was carried all the way through.


Adobe: Tell us more about your action sports work.

da Costa: Action sports give us a free reign over creativity that we might not get with corporate projects because of branding standards or other parameters. We do a lot of the action sports projects on spec. The sky’s the limit creatively. We can use props and actors. It all comes down to budget.

Earlier this year, we completed a project for Velosolutions, a Swiss company that builds pump tracks – which are like skate parks for bikes – all around the world. To promote the opening of the newest park, we worked with champion German freerider Timo Pritzel to be in a quirky intro where he’s a teacher who invites students to ride their bikes because it’s more fun than math and English.

We’re also getting into a more cinematically-styled approach as well as 4K workflows since we started working with Sony FS700 super slow-motion cameras. Along with Premiere Pro and After Effects, we’re able to deploy high-end techniques and workflows and bring Hollywood production values to the action sports world. We put together videos that wouldn’t have been achievable two years ago.

Adobe: What other projects have you worked on recently?

da Costa: A few months ago, I worked on a feature documentary starring John Hurt for ITV, where I helped to train an editor moving from Avid to Premiere Pro. The documentary was about the famous poets who wrote during World War I, and whilst assisting with the online edit, I also created the show’s title sequence in After Effects. At the moment, I’m completing a series of animations for the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, illustrating the firing mechanisms of the very first rifles. That’s what I love about my work, there’s loads of different things coming my way on pretty much a daily basis, from action sports and TV work to installations and online advertising.

Adobe: What are you most excited about for the future?

da Costa: I’m excited to do more 4K projects. Adobe tools such as Premiere Pro will help us take our work to the next level in terms of working in 4K/UHD resolutions and high-end formats like CinemaDNG for editing, visual effects, and grading.

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Showcasing breathtaking mountains and raw athleticism

Epic freesking and snowboarding tour improves video workflow and productivity with Adobe Creative Cloud

The Freeride World Tour by The North Face (FWT) is the top big mountain freeskiing and snowboarding tour in the world. FWT doesn’t deal with artificial jumps and groomed slopes. Athletes use the entire slope, including overhangs and cliff-faces, choosing their own path down the mountain while demonstrating control and technique through fluid movements and jumps. The mountains don’t just up the action for the athletes; they also challenge the event photographers and cinematographers. David Arnaud, the producer who has been in charge of the television and video production on FWT since 2009, along with Editor Aurelie Monod and a crew of up to 35 people, work in extremely challenging conditions to bring the excitement of FWT to viewers.

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Modern and daring filmmaking

Ambitious French filmmakers produce their first genre feature film using Adobe Creative Cloud and Adobe Premiere Pro CC

The zombie movie genre, which dates back as far as the 1930s, includes dozens of films from comedies to true horror classics. Insolence Productions, created by Anaïs Bertrand in 2009, combines both comedy and horror in a new film for zombie movie enthusiasts, Super Z. After producing nine award-winning short films, this is the first feature from Insolence Productions. The movie was filmed in the heart of France in September 2013 and directed by Julien Arnaud Tabarly Volte. Producer Laura Townsend worked with Co-producer Emmanuel Pampuri and Paul Ferré, the film’s talented editor, to create the film using an Adobe video workflow.


Adobe: How did you get started in the movie industry?

Pampuri: I started as cameraman in 1991 then worked on movie sets with montage, production, and finally in post production. For many years, I worked on the sets of live performances, helping capture the performing arts on video. I started my company, Les Machineurs, in 2006. We specialize mostly in post-production work but also cover the entire filmmaking workflow, from shooting to post production. We provide equipment and expertise, as well as the final output.
Townsend: I’ve been involved in the movie industry for the past eight years. I started as a production assistant then quickly moved up to director of production on short films and then full-length feature films. I started a company three years ago called La Ruche Production and produced Super Z in collaboration with Insolence Productions as a freelancer. I’ve worked with a multitude of production companies and studios on regional full-length feature films and I’m hoping to someday collaborate with U.S. filmmakers.

Adobe: What was your role with the film Super Z?

Pampuri: My role with Super Z is a bit complicated. I’m the workflow glue. I was initially the one that proposed the collaboration and brought the teams together for the realization of this motion picture. My role covered every aspect of the project from shooting to post production, including technical decisions such as equipment and software choices. I was the main coordinator for this film. Les Machineurs was also the digital lab for the film and, being the principle, I had my hands in many different aspects of its realization.
Townsend: I am a producer on the film. I met the directors about 15 years ago and was brought in by the group at Insolence Productions. I shared my role with the company’s founder Anaïs Bertrand. Over the years, I’ve collaborated with the directors and the technical team on a multitude of projects.


Adobe: Have you personally used Adobe Premier Pro CC?

Pampuri: I used Adobe Premiere Pro CC for post-production work on Super Z. I’m a member of the Adobe influencer program and use Premiere Pro on a regular basis with most projects I work on.

Adobe: Tell us about Super Z.

Townsend: It’s a movie that provoked a high level of interest among industry professionals, actors, and comedians. Given the unusual and unexpected nature of its horror/comedy premise, the projects was a challenge that many of us were eager to take on. For the same reasons, getting the financial support necessary to bring our ideas to life was a big challenge especially here in France. We had to seek help from the local film community, numerous private contributors, and the web, where we raised close to 13,000 Euros on

A solid partnership with Adobe also helped us tremendously along the way. We ended up launching the project on a relatively small budget and are very happy with how things turned out thanks to Adobe Creative Cloud applications, especially Premiere Pro CC.


Adobe: How did Adobe Creative Cloud applications help?

Pampuri: The choice to go with Premiere Pro was an easy one to make. The tool made all our lives much easier. The footage was shot with RED cameras so we needed a tool that could support raw R3D file formats and allow us to rapidly upload and work with the files without wasting time formatting or dealing with compatibility issues. This aspect alone was reason enough for us to go with Premiere Pro.

Overall, there were many special effects in the film. We had a separate agency creating the effects and it was my job to help ensure a seamless workflow between all the teams involved. They used After Effects for simple 2D animations. We were able to gather elements from all different sources and easily integrate them into Premiere Pro without wasting any time dealing with compatibly or reformatting issues. Synergy, flexibility, simplicity, and efficiency were the identifiable benefits behind our choice of Adobe Creative Cloud.

Ferré: In the past I used Final Cut Pro and hadn’t used Premiere Pro for a project of this magnitude. With this film, I had Premiere Pro at my disposal and I was impressed with the overall speed of execution. We didn’t have to wait long hours for rendering and were able to use our raw R3D files directly from the cameras. The software itself was very intuitive and user-friendly. Compared to other solutions I’ve used in the past I can say it is very robust and fast. I greatly appreciated how much valuable time we were able to save thanks to Adobe Premiere Pro.


Adobe: Did you discover any new features while using Premiere Pro for the film?

Ferré: Real-time rendering was quite a pleasant surprise for me. When I made edits, I was able to export right away and see the result without having to wait a long time for rendering or reformatting. We can apply effects and filters and visualize the result in real time instead of waiting for hours.

Adobe: Were there any challenges?

Pampuri: At the beginning we had issues finding the right computers along with the appropriate hardware add-ons to tackle such a colossal project. Due to our limited budget, we were using an outdated Mac Pro computer that didn’t allow us to take full advantage of all the features that came with the software. Since we had budget restrictions, we struggled a bit getting the right equipment to do the job. There were issues with audio cards and memory capacity. After we upgraded the equipment and had the right technical infrastructure, everything worked well and we were able to make up for lost time.

Adobe: Can you see yourselves using Adobe video tools in the future?

Pampuri: Les Machineurs is already standardizing on Adobe Creative Cloud. Whether it’s Premiere Pro, After Effects, or Prelude, we appreciate the robustness and efficiency of this set of tools.
Townsend: My team and I were truly impressed with the performance of Adobe Premiere Pro CC. I plan on using it in post-production environments in the future project. My company already uses Adobe Audition for music videos and sound treatment.

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