Posts tagged "bbc"

Adobe Primetime & Turner Broadcasting: “Scale and Execution, Exactly Like TV”

As a life­long sports fan, I get excited about work­ing alongside the world’s largest media com­pa­nies to make it eas­ier for view­ers like me to watch more events on more screens.

When Adobe Prime­time first launched, we helped NBC Sports and the BBC bring the Lon­don 2012 Olympic Games to view­ers every­where. Adobe Prime­time pay-TV pass (for­merly Adobe Pass) has been instru­men­tal in bring­ing the 2012 and 2013 NCAA bas­ket­ball tour­na­ment to col­lege hoops fans. Now we’re help­ing deliver NBA games to view­ers who want to check in with their favorite teams and play­ers when they’re not in front of a TV set.

Over the past sev­eral weeks, we’ve con­tin­ued our work with Turner, rolling out dynamic ad inser­tion in NBA games streamed to TNTDrama.com, TNT’s mobile apps, and and TNT Over­time, show­cas­ing Adobe’s deep exper­tise in live TV broad­cast­ing to devices and desk­tops.

Out­side the sport­ing arena, as it were, we’ve also helped enable the AdultSwim, Car­toon Net­work and TruTV apps for lin­ear simul­cast pro­gram­ming. A recent arti­cle in Adweek high­lighted some of the inno­v­a­tive work the Adobe Prime­time team has been doing with Turner to drive more rev­enue by expand­ing their breadth of adver­tis­ing oppor­tu­ni­ties across screens, at scale.

The Adobe Prime­time team is con­tin­u­ing to expand the pro­duct offering’s capa­bil­i­ties to address addi­tional busi­ness needs and use cases. We look for­ward to work­ing with more broad­cast­ers, cable com­pa­nies, satel­lite providers, tel­cos and indus­try part­ners to help make every screen a TV. As Seth Ladet­sky, SVP for Turner dig­i­tal ad sales com­mented to AdWeek regard­ing the devel­op­ment of dig­i­tal ad oppor­tu­ni­ties, “If you look at the scale and exe­cu­tion, this is going to be exactly like TV.”

NBA-on-TNT

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BBC: “The biggest broadcasting event in our 90 year history”

A blog post from the BBC Direc­tor Gen­eral Mark Thomp­son has paid trib­ute to the Olympian efforts of every­one at the BBC who deliv­ered what he calls “the biggest broad­cast­ing event in our 90 year his­tory” refer­ring of course to the 2012 Lon­don Games.

BBCThe open­ing cer­e­mony entered the record books as the most-watched pro­grams in the his­tory of the BBC, and fig­ures across all 24 chan­nels of sport were aston­ish­ingly high.

While the top ten events took most of the inter­net feeds, 50 per­cent of con­sump­tion was for ‘less pop­u­lar’ events, val­i­dat­ing the BBC’s deci­sion to have all sports, all the time, with rewind and catch-up capa­bil­i­ties.

There was also clear evi­dence of view­ers tak­ing the Olympics with them through­out the day. Look­ing at how peo­ple were access­ing the BBC cov­er­age online, PC usage peaked at lunchtime, mobile peaked after work around 6pm and tablet use was high­est around 9pm. These truly were the world’s first dig­i­tal games.

More inter­est­ing details pointed out by the BBC include:

- The Open­ing Cer­e­mony drew a peak broad­cast audi­ence of 27.1 mil­lion peo­ple (includ­ing the red but­ton), of which 9.2 mil­lion were via the mobile site and 2.3 mil­lion on tablets
— On the busiest day, the BBC deliv­ered 2.8 petabytes, with the peak traf­fic moment occur­ring when Bradley Wig­gins won Gold and it shifted 700 Gb/s
— Chap­ter mark­ing enabled audi­ences to go back to key event moments instantly – receiv­ing an aver­age 1.5 mil­lion clicks per day – 13,000 clicks alone for Bolt’s 100m Final win
— The first week of the games was the most pop­u­lar ever for BBC Sport Online with a total of 34.7 mil­lion browsers 50 mil­lion requests for the BBC Sport’s live video inter­ac­tive streams and more than 106 mil­lion requests for BBC Olympic video con­tent across all online plat­form
— BBC Sport Online’s most requested live video stream was of the Ten­nis Sin­gles Finals, where Andy Mur­ray and Ser­ena Williams were vic­to­ri­ous.

Chang­ing the world through dig­i­tal expe­ri­ences requires a shared vision. By work­ing with the BBC, an orga­ni­za­tion with a man­date to push tech­nol­ogy bound­ariesand intro­duce inno­v­a­tive new ser­vices to its view­ers, Adobe and all the broad­cast part­ners have deliv­ered an incred­i­ble feat of broad­cast engi­neer­ing both online and on devices.

As a pub­licly funded ser­vice, the BBC has deliv­ered tremen­dous value to UK cit­i­zens, not only via tra­di­tional broad­cast, but also through the deliv­ery of the games online and across devices. Adobe, through ele­ments of Adobe’s Project Prime­time, is extremely proud of the role it played in help­ing the BBC deliver its out­stand­ing Olympics cov­er­age and of the deep part­ner­ships formed with the BBC’s Future Media team.

Some nice user com­ments we’ve seen:

I think that I just got a life­times value from my license fee in 2 weeks!! — Mike Thom­sett

I’ve always thought the License Fee was worth pay­ing; now I think that more than ever. The BBC isa credit to Britain and sets the stan­dard to which broad­cast­ers around the world aspire...Thank you BBC, I have fal­len in love with you again — Andrew McNeil

We would like to con­grat­u­late the BBC and its lead­er­ship for the vision, col­lab­o­ra­tion, pas­sion and drive that has set a new bar for broad­cast, extend­ing far beyond what we know today as “tele­vi­sion”. Lon­don 2012 has set the stage for every broad­caster around the world to bring TV con­tent and new dig­i­tal expe­ri­ences online.

Adobe’s Project Primetime Powers BBC’s Coverage of the Olympics

Ear­lier this month, NBC launched two Olympics apps that are pow­ered by Adobe tech­nolo­gies and built on Adobe AIR, Adobe’s Flash run­time for mobile apps.

Today, we’re excited to announce that the BBC is lever­ag­ing key com­po­nents of Project Prime­time in their live and video on demand (VOD) cov­er­age of the Lon­don Games. The con­tent is being deliv­ered through a new, HTML5 app built with Adobe Phone­Gap, Adobe’s tools and frame­work for cre­at­ing cross-plat­form HTML5 apps for smart­phones and tablets.

The BBC employs Project Prime­time to power its cov­er­age of the Olympic Games and other major sport­ing events to mil­lions of mobile and con­nected devices across the UK for the first time in his­tory. Posi­tioned as “the Dig­i­tal Olympics” by the BBC, we are happy to provide some of the core com­po­nents required to deliver on their vision.

Sev­eral Adobe tech­nolo­gies are being used to power BBC’s cov­er­age of the Olympics. Adobe Media Server pre­pares the con­tent in using both the HTTP Dynamic Stream­ing (HDS) for­mat and the HTTP Live Stream­ing for­mat (HLS) to stream live and on demand video across desk­tops, con­nected TVs and iOS devices. Adobe Media Server is also used as a video origin to feed video across con­tent deliv­ery net­works to meet capac­ity require­ments.

Primetime-screenshot2To ensure an unin­ter­rupted view­ing expe­ri­ence, Adobe worked closely with the BBC to provide adap­tive bitrate video play­back tech­nol­ogy built using the Open Source Media Frame­work (OSMF) that we have updated to ensure that video re-buffer­ing or stream dis­rup­tions are lim­ited as the video leaves the broad­cast cen­ter and reaches the con­sumer device.

Prime­time High­lights will also be used to power the rapid con­ver­sion of live video to on-demand clips. This allows audi­ences to expe­ri­ence inter­est­ing moments through­out the games, even if they can­not watch it live. Prime­time High­lights can ingest pre-encoded video streams and quickly re-assem­ble them into clips with full adap­tive bitrate sup­port and made avail­able to the audi­ence quickly. This tech­nol­ogy has been com­pletely inte­grated into the BBC’s data man­age­ment flow, so the video expe­ri­ence will be sup­ported by syn­chro­nized data about the sport and the ath­lete.