Archive for January, 2016

#CreativeFriday – Adobe’s theatre schedule at the UK Photography show

Adobe is once again extremely excited to be running the Adobe Theatre at the Photography Show this year. We’re delighted to have the opportunity to showcase what the modern day Photographer needs to know, covering all aspects of a photographic journey. We’ll share with you how to add value to the image capture within your camera, image editing techniques and best practices at the computer, as well as many options to publish your work to the internet and across your social channels. We believe that armed with your camera, the Adobe Creative Cloud Photography plan and content from these talks, you will be able to take your images to the next level.
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Session Descriptions
Combining Lightroom and Photoshop CC in your retouching workflow
In the past few updates in the Creative Cloud, Lightroom and Photoshop have seen various improvements for photographers. This session, hosted by a re-touching expert, will look in detail at the new tools and explain how to improve your post production/re-touching workflows, to create even more beautiful images.
Objectives
  • Learn about improvements with both Lightroom and Photoshop for Creative Cloud
  • Explore workflows between both Lightroom and Photoshop
  • This session will show how you can get the best from both solutions

Hidden gems in Photoshop CC for Photographers

This talk will explore often overlooked features inside Photoshop CC that we think are both underused and valuable to photographers or anyone that would like to learn more about the application.

Objectives

  • Learn about features that are often overlooked in Photoshop CC
  • Explore features that you may have missed in the newer released of Photoshop CC
  • Explore Tools used by the Professionals

Making your Photos look amazing with Lightroom

In this session you’ll discover new ways of correcting common photo issues and enhancing and combining images to give them the wow factor.

Objectives

  • Learn new ways to correct common Photo problems
  • Learn how to enhance images to give them a wow factor
  • Explore techniques used by the Professionals

3D Printing with Photoshop CC and the Photography Plan

3D Printing is taking the world by storm, and this technology is opening up new creative ideas for Photographers. In early 2014 Photoshop gained the ability to create/print 3D objects using a variety of printers, materials and services. This talk will walk you through 3D printing in Photoshop with examples of how Photographers can embrace it in their work.

Objectives

  • Explore the Photoshop 3D Interface
  • See a practical example of Printing a 3D Object
  • Learn about 3D Printable options for Photographers

Colour Management – Perfecting your workflow

This session is brought in conjunction with Adobe and Datacolor and will provide an end to end solution for colour management.  We will explain how colour management can easily be incorporated into your workflow from ‘in the camera’, to the screen and finishing at the printer and transform your workflow forever. This session will ensure that you are able to make perfect looking prints every time.

Objectives

  • Explore how to colour manage your screen and printer with the Datacolor suite of solutions
  • Learn how to soft proof photographs in Lightroom or Photoshop to get the perfect print
  • See a practical demo of how colour calibration with Datacolor works

Lightroom – Mastering the basics

This session is perfect for the person this is just starting out with Lightroom. The speaker will walk you through the key benefits of the program. The session will touch on how to import, organise and find your images as well as the tools that are available to you.

Objectives

  • Explore the benefits of Lightroom
  • Learn how to start using Lightroom for organising your pictures and making some basic image adjustments
  • See a practical demo of to use Lightroom

Video Editing with Photoshop CC and the Photography plan

We all have cameras that are able to create stunning photographs, and many can now record stunning HD quality video too. This session will show how you can import your video clips into Photoshop and use your existing Photoshop skills to edit and create a compelling short film.

Objectives

  • Explore the common tools that are used inside Photoshop to Edit a video
  • Learn how to use the Photoshop Video Interface as well as the tools to make a successful edit
  • See a practical demo of how a short film is made

Using Mobile apps in the imaging workflow

The Adobe Creative Cloud including the Photography plan includes the Desktop apps, as well as mobile apps across devices. In this session, Eric explores these apps and examines how the photographer might benefit from them in the imaging worklfow.

Objectives

  • Learn which apps are available with the Creative Cloud Photography Plan
  • Learn how to use the Creative Cloud mobile apps in conjunction with the desktop apps
  • See a practical demo of how the mobile apps can be used

Fundamental imaging techniques of Post Production with David Noton – Guest Speaker

This year we are extremely pleased to welcome by Canon Explorer and one of the world’s leading landscape and travel photographers David Noton to the Adobe Seminar room. David’s talk, the Fundamentals of Post-Production will cover new developments and techniques within the Adobe Photography plan that have supported his imaging processing needs in 2015. This promises to be a not to be missed session and a highlight for Adobe seminar room this year.

Objectives

  • Top techniques from a working professional Photographer
  • See a practical examples of world class image editing
  • Learn about new features used by David in his workflow

Travel Photography editing workflow with the Photography Plan

The Creative Cloud Photography Plan offers photographers a wide range of tools and services to support the management of their images, the editing process, as well as a defined and industry standard worfklows. One such workflow is travel photography. This talk will demonstrate how Lightroom and Lightroom mobile can support the travel photographer and maximise their time when travelling, but also show a non destructive workflow that will streamline the photo editing process between Lightroom, Lightroom Mobile and Photoshop.

Objectives

  • Explore how the Photography plan can support travel photographers
  • Learn tips for maximising time when out in the field
  • See a practical demo of a non destructive editing process using Lightroom / Lightroom mobile and Photoshop

Organising your Photography with Lightroom and the Photography plan

This session is for anyone that would like to understand the best way to organise their content in Lightroom. The talk will cover importing, keywording, as well as ways to find your content. One focus area on the talk is how to orgnaise your content and workflow options when you move your work from Lightroom to a Photoshop workflow and top tips how this works in the real world.

Objectives

  • Explore how Lightroom’s Library module helps with organising your work
  • Learn tips for import, keywording, backup and image editing strategies in the Photography plan
  • See a practical demonstrations of different workflows and solving some common workflow problems

Photoshop CC for Photographers

Want to find out which new features of Photoshop will boost your creativity and save you time? In this session freelance photographer Gavin Hoey will share a variety of real world Photoshop tips and tricks to fire up your photography enthusiasm. You’ll find out Gavin’s favourite Photoshop tools for creating simple but eye-catching visual effects and how and why he shoots with Photoshop mind.

Objectives

  • Explore how Photoshop can boost your creativity
  • Learn real world tips to excite your Photographs
  • See a practical demonstrations of Photoshop in action

Using Adobe Slate & Behance to publish your work

Adobe Slate is a new way to create and publish wonderful online content. Adobe Slate will allow you to turn your ideas and photos into engaging visual stories. This session will walk you though creating an Adobe Slate project. To get an idea of what can be created, here is one that I prepared earlier (http://bit.ly/EagleHunters). This session will also talk about Behance as another option to exhibit your work online, to a large community of Creative professionals.

Objectives

  • Explore how to publish content in multiple ways
  • Learn tips for presenting your work online
  • See a practical demo of building a Slate app, as well as placing content in Behance

For more information on the show itself, including how to get there, directions as well as other things that are happening, please visit the Photography show web site.

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Lightroom CC 2015.4 / 6.4 now available

Lightroom CC 2015.4 / 6.4 are now available

Lightroom CC 2015.4 and Lightroom 6.4 are now available on Adobe.com. The goal of this release is to provide additional camera raw support, lens profile support

and address bugs that were introduced in previous releases of Lightroom. This release also includes a new Boundary Warp feature for Creative Cloud members.

Thank you for all your feedback and passion for Lightroom.

Introducing Boundary Warp

Stitched panoramas are often created with areas of white or have no image data on the outer edges (as shown below)

Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 10.34.56

There are several ways to handle these results. A crop could be applied to the image either inside Lightroom or Photoshop. However, this can potentially result in loosing some important image details near the edges of the image. Another approach is to use Content Aware Fill in Photoshop and create new pixel data from surrounding areas of the image. However, this process may require several attempts to obtain a satisfying, smooth, artefact free image.

Lightroom CC 2015.4, introduces the Boundary Warp feature. Boundary wary has been designed to analyze the  edges of the working stitch, and allows warping of the image so that removes the areas where no data exists. In the following image, Boundary Warp has been applied to make a great panoramic result.

Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 10.41.54

Final result after anther 2 minutes of effort

Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 10.45.47

 

New Camera Support in Lightroom CC 2015 and Lightroom 6.4

  • Fujifilm X70
  • Fujifilm X-E2S
  • Fujifilm X-Pro2
  • Leica M (Typ 262)
  • Leica X-U (Typ 113)
  • Panasonic DMC-ZS60 (DMC-TZ80,DMC-TZ81,DMC-TZ85)
  • Phase One IQ150
  • Sony ILCA-68 (A68)

Additional Updates in Lightroom CC 2015 and Lightroom 6.4

  • Nikon 1 J4 Camera Matching Profile added
  • The panorama merging process should complete roughly twice as fast as Lightroom 6.3
  • Improved quality when applying Auto Straighten and Upright “Level” mode
  • A preference was added to the Mac to prevent accidental “speed swiping”
  • Metadata is added to merged panoramas to support Photoshop’s Adaptive Wide Angle filter
  • Customers can now set the location of where photos are stored when downloaded from Lightroom mobile or Lightroom web in the preference panel or contextually in the folder panel
  • Thumbnails update much quicker when copying and pasting settings in the grid view
  • Images load faster in the Library module when you are zoomed in and navigating images
  • Tethered support added for the Nikon D5500 and Nikon D7200

New Lens Profile Support in Lightroom CC 2015 and Lightroom 6.4

 

Canon EF Mount

  • Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Bower 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Bower 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC

Canon EFM Mount

  • Canon EFM 55200mm f/4.56.3 IS STM
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Fujifilm X

  • Bower 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Leica M

  • MS Optical Perar 28mm f/4 Super Triplet
  • MS Optical Sonnetar 50mm f/1.1 MC
  • Nikon F Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC

Nikon F

  • Bower 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Bower 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Bower 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 200mm f/2G ED VR II
  • Rokinon 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC

Olympus

  • Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Panasonic

  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Pentax K

  • Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Bower 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Bower 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • smh PENTAX-DA 18-270mm F3.5- 6.3 ED SM

Pentax 645

  • HD PENTAXDFA645 35mm F3.5 AL [IF]

Samsung NX

  • Bower 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Sony A

  • Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Bower 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Bower 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC

Sony E

  • Bower 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS

Sony FE

  • Rokinon 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Parrot

  • Bebop Drone 2.0

Fixed Bugs

  • Auto Sync of some settings failed when using smart previews
  • Lightroom would ignore model specific custom default settings for some cameras, including some Leica and Sony models.
  • Crop resets to image bounds when adjusting rotation via slider
  • In Lights Out mode, an image would “disappear” if a customer uses the Undo functionality
  • SIGMA 50mm f1.4 ART lens was incorrectly identified as Zeiss Milvus 50mm f1.4
  • Soft Proofing RGB readout values differed for same file between 5.7.1 and 6.x
  • Import from iPhoto would result in all photos receiving a “pick” flag
  • Comments from Lightroom web come in to Lightroom on the desktop as already “read.”
  • Lightroom would not display the correct EXIF metadata for some video files generated by Canon, Fuji and Panasonic cameras
  • Vertical panoramas created using Merge could appear with the wrong orientation
  • The video cache did not respect the maximum size specified in the preferences
  • Customers experienced issues importing video files in some scenarios
  • Tethering Nikon cameras on Mac OS X 10.11(El Capitan) did not work properly

Installation Instructions

Please select Help > Updates to use the update mechanism in the Creative Cloud app.

Give us feedback

Once you’ve updated to the latest version of Lightroom, don’t forget to leave us feedback about your experiences. Lightroom wouldn’t be what it is today without our passionate and loyal customers around the world. Giving us regular feedback helps us to find and fix issues that we may otherwise not know about. We are listening.

Here are a few ways that you can send us feedback:

Report bugs and suggest features

Discuss workflow and get help with how-to questions or basic troubleshooting

 

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Camera Raw 9.4 Now Available

Camera Raw 9.4 is now available through the update mechanism in Photoshop CC and the Creative Cloud application.

As mentioned in an update to our camera support policy here, Camera Raw 9.4 is only available in Photoshop CC or later. Customers using older versions of Photoshop can utilize the DNG Converter for continued camera support.

Introducing Boundary Warp

Stitched panoramas are often created with areas of white or have no image data on the outer edges (as shown below) (Images were created from Lightroom CC 2015.4 / 6.4)

Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 10.34.56

There are several ways to handle these results. A crop could be applied to the image either inside Lightroom or Photoshop. However, this can potentially result in loosing some important image details near the edges of the image. Another approach is to use Content Aware Fill in Photoshop and create new pixel data from surrounding areas of the image. However, this process may require several attempts to obtain a satisfying, smooth, artefact free image.

Lightroom CC 2015.4, introduces the Boundary Warp feature. Boundary wary has been designed to analyze the  edges of the working stitch, and allows warping of the image so that removes the areas where no data exists. In the following image, Boundary Warp has been applied to make a great panoramic result.

Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 10.41.54

Final result after anther 2 minutes of effort

Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 10.45.47

New Camera Support in Lightroom CC 2015 and Lightroom 6.4

  • Fujifilm X70
  • Fujifilm X-E2S
  • Fujifilm X-Pro2
  • Leica M (Typ 262)
  • Leica X-U (Typ 113)
  • Panasonic DMC-ZS60 (DMC-TZ80,DMC-TZ81,DMC-TZ85)
  • Phase One IQ150
  • Sony ILCA-68 (A68)

Additional Updates in Lightroom CC 2015 and Lightroom 6.4

  • Nikon 1 J4 Camera Matching Profile added
  • The panorama merging process should complete roughly twice as fast as Lightroom 6.3
  • Improved quality when applying Auto Straighten and Upright “Level” mode
  • A preference was added to the Mac to prevent accidental “speed swiping”
  • Metadata is added to merged panoramas to support Photoshop’s Adaptive Wide Angle filter
  • Customers can now set the location of where photos are stored when downloaded from Lightroom mobile or Lightroom web in the preference panel or contextually in the folder panel
  • Thumbnails update much quicker when copying and pasting settings in the grid view
  • Images load faster in the Library module when you are zoomed in and navigating images
  • Tethered support added for the Nikon D5500 and Nikon D7200

New Lens Profile Support in Lightroom CC 2015 and Lightroom 6.4

Canon EF Mount

  • Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Bower 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Bower 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC

Canon EFM Mount

  • Canon EFM 55200mm f/4.56.3 IS STM
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Fujifilm X 

  • Bower 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Leica M 

  • MS Optical Perar 28mm f/4 Super Triplet
  • MS Optical Sonnetar 50mm f/1.1 MC
  • Nikon F Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC

Nikon F

  • Bower 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Bower 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Bower 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 200mm f/2G ED VR II
  • Rokinon 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC

Olympus

  • Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Panasonic 

  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Pentax K 

  • Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Bower 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Bower 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • smh PENTAX-DA 18-270mm F3.5- 6.3 ED SM

Pentax 645 

  • HD PENTAXDFA645 35mm F3.5 AL [IF]

Samsung NX 

  • Bower 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Sony A 

  • Bower 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Bower 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Bower 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Bower 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 24mm f/1.4 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC

Sony E

  • Bower 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye
  • Samyang 8mm f/2.8 UMC Fisheye II
  • Samyang 12mm f/2 NCS CS
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.2 AS UMC CS

Sony FE 

  • Rokinon 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Rokinon 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS Fisheye
  • Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 35mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC
  • Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC

Parrot 

  • Bebop Drone 2.0

Fixed Bugs and Other Changes

  • Fixed issue where vertical panoramas created using Merge could appear with the wrong orientation.
  • Addressed a bug that would ignore modelspecific
  • custom default settings for some cameras, including some Leica and Sony models.
  • Corrected occasional crash using Crop tool after a Merge operation completed.
  • Fixed an issue where state of HSL controls would be rendered incorrectly in GPU mode when applying Contrast or Saturation local control adjustments.
  • Addressed the issue of the SIGMA 50mm f1.4 ART lens incorrectly identified as Zeiss Milvus 50mm f1.4.

Download Links

Camera Raw 9.4 – Please select Help>Updates to use the update mechanism in the Creative Cloud app.

Please note – If you have trouble updating to the latest ACR update via the Creative Cloud application, please refer to the following plugin installation:

https://helpx.adobe.com/camera-raw/kb/camera-raw-plug-in-installer.html (Updated)

DNG Converter 9.4: Mac | Win

 

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#CreativeFriday – Configuring Scratch Disks in Photoshop CC for Better Performance

Recently my system has become crammed with a lot of files and not a lot of free disk space, leaving me with little headroom for Photoshop CC to work efficiently. In this case, especially on some big render jobs (3D, Video and also some large image files), Photoshop will tell me that it’s run out of scratch disk space, and the job in hand will halt.

Typically the scratch disk is the same as the startup disk (where Photoshop is running), but this can be changed or complimented.

I could delete some files, or move some files to another disk and free up some disk space from the initial scratch disk, but there were some important customer data on the drive and I wanted to keep it local.

In this case, I wanted to compliment my current Scratch disk with more space, and I can do this by plugging an external drive(s) into the computer and telling Photoshop to use this as a scratch disk as well. Photoshop will automatically place any scratch data (essentially working data) to the drive.

Under the Preferences in Photoshop, there is an option for Scratch disks, open this configuration setting. You can below, that by default the main drive where Photoshop is installed is selected and is the start disk.

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 16.03.03

To extend the scratch disk and choose a different one or to compliment the existing start up disk, plug the drive in to the computer, then re-select the Scratch Disk preferences and it should appear in the list. Once selected, Photoshop will then allocate the space and give you more headroom.

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 16.03.03 v2

It’s the SWPP Societies convention this weekend, if you are planning to attend, Adobe has a seminar room with free talks for Friday, Saturday and Sunday. For more details follow this link. If you are coming, pop by and say hello.

 

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Photoshop CC 2015.1.2 Update – Now Available

Photoshop 2015.1.2 – Update (1/20/2016)

1/20/2016 – Today we released Photoshop CC 2015 update version 2015.1.2 on both Mac and Windows, to address several workflow issues.

Customer reported issues resolved

How to get the updates

How to confirm that the Update worked:

Give us feedback!

Once you’ve updated to the newest version of Photoshop, don’t forget to leave us feedback about your experiences. The quality of Photoshop wouldn’t be what it is today without our passionate and loyal customers around the world. Giving us regular feedback helps us to find and fix issues that we may otherwise not know about. We are listening.

Here are a few ways that you can provide feedback:

Thanks!

Source of blog post, Jeff Cranberry’s Crawl Space

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#CreativeFriday – Sync Lightroom edits across Creative Cloud to other collaborators

Creative Cloud is very useful for many things. In a recent blog post i wrote about how i’ve been using it to transfer my negative scans to my Lightroom main machine and use two computers in tandem, without having to setup any networking servers (saving me time and money).

Another great use is when you are collaborating on edits, especially with your Lightroom adjustments/keywords etc. As we know Lightroom is the best non-destructive image editor out there, and it’s probably the same application that your peer(s) are using.

Lightroom as an image processor doesn’t actually make any changes to the physical files (RAW, Video, JPG etc.), until the adjustments are exported. By default Lightroom places any adjustments (including keywords) into the catalog, however, it can be configured to place any changes in a very small .xmp file next to the image file. This occurs, especially when a native camera manufacturer file exists (i.e. Canon, Nikon etc), but will embed any changes in the .xmp file into an Adobe format, like PSD, TIFF or DNG files. These adjustments are carried/embedded for each format by using a small meta data file called a .XMP file, this file contains the adjustments.

Configuring Lightroom to write to this small .XMP file is pretty simple and can be done in the catalog settings. Within the catalog settings, the ‘Automatically write meta data changes into .XMP’ needs to be turned on, once done, the adjustments will be written to the external .xml file automatically (you can also force this to happen using CMD+S (Mac)/ Ctrl+S (Win).

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 16.52.24Obviously this is useful when used locally, and can support a back up strategy of your adjustments, without adding much over head to your setup/storage. But this .xmp file change can be very useful when collaborating with others, using Creative Cloud.

Creative Cloud as you probably already know can be used as a source for images, but it’s possible to add the Creative Cloud folder (or folder within it) to your Lightroom catalog. Just make sure that the file action is set to ‘ADD’ otherwise, Lightroom will copy the files.

 

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 16.49.01

Let us take these three images, that exist in the Creative Cloud folder.

N.B. Anything in the creative cloud folder (as long as folder sync is turned on (set up is covered in this blog post)), Further configuration to the Creative Cloud folder is described here (I.e. choosing folders to sync/not sync).

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 17.00.05

When adjustments are made to the image and CTRL+S/CMD+S is pressed (will be done automatically as well, but the save works if you need it on demand), a .XMP file is created next to the file on the Creative Cloud folder

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 17.01.39

At this point, the .xmp file is synced to the Creative Cloud by using the desktop application.

To enable others to access the folder, in this case above, the ‘RAW files’ (you will most likely have a different file name), folder  supports a right click, and doing this will allow collaboration. Selecting Collaborators will take you to the Web view of the folder and ask for an Adobe ID for the user to collaborate with. The process to do this is covered in this post.

Once the folder has collaborators assigned, (using an Adobe ID (even users without an active subscription), they will need to accept an invitation (sent by email), also people using and older version of Lightroom that have an Adobe ID but don’t have a subscription, can partake). The other user(s) will just need to import the folder into their Lightroom, and make sure that the .xml setting is turned in the catalog settings. Changes can now be made to the image on their computer and any changes with either be automatically sent over the Creative Cloud (or via CTRL+S/CMD+S) and will be send to the other collaborators.

Other collaborators will be able to see the changes, by just Synchronising the folder where the changes have been made. Synchronise folder can be called up by right clicking on the folder in question (which can be a root folder or a sub folder).

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 17.02.04

 

N.B. Lightroom does not have any check-in or check out locking mechanism, so you will just need to have a conversation with the other collaborators when the edits are ready for syncing.

I hope you enjoy this, but again, it’s a manual process and does not have a read only configuration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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#CreativeFriday – Levels in Curves (Photoshop CC)

Most image editors will work with Levels and Curves on an image to :-

  • Levels – Set the white and black point
  • Curves – Decrease the values of black and increase the value of white

Both of these in combination will help create contrast in the image, and ultimalty more interesting to look at.

These operations are typcially performed using an adjustment layer for Levels and independently a curves layer.

Actually Photoshop can perform both of these operations just on the curves adjustment.

Let’s take this image. It’s a bit flat, so by working on both Levels and Curves on a Curves layer, we can make it more interesting, just in a single step.

Screen Shot 2016-01-09 at 00.53.24First thing is to create a new Curves layer, using the menu item, Layer, New Adjustment Layer and Curves.

Screen Shot 2016-01-09 at 00.53.24When working with Levels, it’s beneficial to show the clipping points, this will make it really easy to see where the black / white points start to clip to black or white. The clipping indicators are available on the curves panel, by turning it on in the fly out menu. Once the curves dialog box is open, click on the fly out menu (marked in red), and select ‘Show Clipping for Black/White points’.

Screen Shot 2016-01-09 at 00.53.24 v2Now the clipping points have been turned on, when the left hand slider is moved towards the right (marked in red below), at some point the black points will show (as below) when they clip to pure black. The outcome of this, is that the details in the shadow will evetually be erroded away and detail will be lost (can be used creatively, but this type of precision will help control the black point).

Screen Shot 2016-01-09 at 00.54.44v3

The same can be applied to the highlights area, by moving the right slider to the left (be carefull with the white clipping point, as it will clip to white and can be offputting for the viewer when shown on a backlit screen).

Screen Shot 2016-01-09 at 00.55.01v4

Once the white and black points have been set, then the curve can be applied, in this case an ‘S’ curve.

Screen Shot 2016-01-09 at 00.55.40 v6

That’s it. Photoshop levels and curves, just saved me an extra step. This can also help when used on a mask, or a clipping mask , as all operations are on a single layer, which in turn will make the document simpler with less layers to adjust and think about.

L1003643-Edit-Edit-2-1

 

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