Posts in Category "how-to"

HOW TO: Use the Acrobat.com plug-in for Outlook to Share Large Files Automatically

(Repost with a how to title in order to highlight the Acrobat.com plug-in for Outlook video)

Remember the old Hair Club for Men commercials where the president
says, “I’m not only the hair club president, I’m also a client“? Well, I
share a similar feeling about the Adobe tools I evangelize. I’m also a
client.

 

tweetmeme_url = ‘http://blogs.adobe.com/rjacquez/2010/04/how_to_use_the_acrobatcom_plug.html';

In my spare time I often develop eLearning modules — highlighting
ways to use our own Adobe Technologies more effectively — and then
share these with my internal teams.

A couple of weeks ago, I
developed a brief eLeaning module on how to use the Acrobat.com
Outlook plug-in for sharing large files
.

The module was
included in last week’s internal newsletter! I’d like to share it with
you here, since you too have access to this plug-in, and other
Acrobat.com services.

I’d also like to share the specific Adobe eLearning
Suite
tools I used to put the module together:

  • Adobe Soundbooth (SB). I use SB
    all the time for all things audio recording and editing. For this
    particular project I used SB to record the audio files for slides
    1, 2, 4 and 5, which I then imported into Adobe Presenter. For
    the background audio you hear throughout, I used one of the
    included scores in SB. Even though Captivate has audio editing
    capabilities, I prefer to edit Captivate’s audio in SB. To do
    this, I navigate to the Captivate slide that needs editing, select
    the audio in the Library, and then select Edit with Soundbooth.
    There, I do all required editing and select File > Save. Then
    the updated version is sent directly back to Captivate.
  • Adobe Captivate. Captivate is
    my baby! I do all of my software simulations using Adobe Captivate
    and then share them on Twitter and on my blog. I really like
    using Captivate and Adobe Presenter together and I have been
    looking for an opportunity to embed a Captivate simulation in an
    Adobe Presenter slide (which I’ve done here on slide 3).
  • Adobe Flash. I’m by no means a
    Flash expert, but I use Flash as a way to supplement my Captivate
    work with short animations. For this module I only used it briefly
    to add a short animation on the first slide of Captivate to
    display a keyboard shortcut for creating a new email. You can see
    this at the beginning of the Simulation on slide 3.
  • Adobe Presenter. While some
    people might think that Adobe Presenter and Captivate compete,
    they actual complement each other, and I use both tools in most of
    the projects I develop. I really like Presenter because it
    enables me to stay in PowerPoint and add audio to my slides and
    sync the audio to the animations I include. Presenter also enables
    me to easily choose a skin for the navigation, along with a
    picture, bio, outline and a thumbnail view of my slides for easy
    navigation.  What I like the most, however, is how easy it is for
    me to insert Captivate simulations on any slide and then have the
    Presenter playbar control the Captivate simulation. The
    applications are well integrated and the final experience is cohesive
    for end-users. To see this in action, check out slide 3 in the
    presentation below.
  • Adobe Photoshop. For this
    particular project, I didn’t use Photoshop much, but I often use
    it to design any graphics I need to include or to edit Captivate
    slides. The ability to import .PSD files into Captivate and
    preserve the Photoshop layers is one of my favorite features in
    the Suite.
  • Adobe Bridge. Bridge is great
    for managing media assets. I use it all the time. It allows me to
    find images I need in Captivate and then use the File > Place
    command to quickly send to Captivate, Photoshop or other products.

So there you have it! These are just a few ways
that I use my Adobe tools. I’d love to hear how you use these Adobe
tools in your everyday workflows.

Watch this brief eLearning
module on how to use the Acrobat.com plug-in for MS Outlook to share
large files. Just click the image below to display the module in a new
window.

 

Contributing Editor:
Phylise Banner
Phylise is an
instructional designer, educator (AEL), avid angler, and proud owner of a
1967 Amphicar. You can view her LinkedIn profile at http://www.linkedin.com/in/phylisebanner

 

,,,,

More than an Adobe Evangelist, I’m also a customer

Remember the old Hair Club for Men commercials where the president says, “I’m not only the hair club president, I’m also a client”? Well, I share a similar feeling about the Adobe tools I evangelize. I’m also a client.  

tweetmeme_url = ‘http://blogs.adobe.com/rjacquez/2010/04/more_than_an_adobe_evangelist.html';

In my spare time I often develop eLearning modules — highlighting ways to use our own Adobe Technologies more effectively — and then share these with my internal teams.

A couple of weeks ago, I developed a brief eLeaning module on how to use the Acrobat.com Outlook plug-in for sharing large files.

The module was included in last week’s internal newsletter! I’d like to share it with you here, since you too have access to this plug-in, and other Acrobat.com services.

I’d also like to share the specific Adobe eLearning Suite tools I used to put the module together:

  • Adobe Soundbooth (SB). I use SB all the time for all things audio recording and editing. For this particular project I used SB to record the audio files for slides 1, 2, 4 and 5, which I then imported into Adobe Presenter. For the background audio you hear throughout, I used one of the included scores in SB. Even though Captivate has audio editing capabilities, I prefer to edit Captivate’s audio in SB. To do this, I navigate to the Captivate slide that needs editing, select the audio in the Library, and then select Edit with Soundbooth. There, I do all required editing and select File > Save. Then the updated version is sent directly back to Captivate.
  • Adobe Captivate. Captivate is my baby! I do all of my software simulations using Adobe Captivate and then share them on Twitter and on my blog. I really like using Captivate and Adobe Presenter together and I have been looking for an opportunity to embed a Captivate simulation in an Adobe Presenter slide (which I’ve done here on slide 3).
  • Adobe Flash. I’m by no means a Flash expert, but I use Flash as a way to supplement my Captivate work with short animations. For this module I only used it briefly to add a short animation on the first slide of Captivate to display a keyboard shortcut for creating a new email. You can see this at the beginning of the Simulation on slide 3.
  • Adobe Presenter. While some people might think that Adobe Presenter and Captivate compete, they actual complement each other, and I use both tools in most of the projects I develop. I really like Presenter because it enables me to stay in PowerPoint and add audio to my slides and sync the audio to the animations I include. Presenter also enables me to easily choose a skin for the navigation, along with a picture, bio, outline and a thumbnail view of my slides for easy navigation.  What I like the most, however, is how easy it is for me to insert Captivate simulations on any slide and then have the Presenter playbar control the Captivate simulation. The applications are well integrated and the final experience is cohesive for end-users. To see this in action, check out slide 3 in the presentation below.
  • Adobe Photoshop. For this particular project, I didn’t use Photoshop much, but I often use it to design any graphics I need to include or to edit Captivate slides. The ability to import .PSD files into Captivate and preserve the Photoshop layers is one of my favorite features in the Suite.
  • Adobe Bridge. Bridge is great for managing media assets. I use it all the time. It allows me to find images I need in Captivate and then use the File > Place command to quickly send to Captivate, Photoshop or other products.

So there you have it! These are just a few ways that I use my Adobe tools. I’d love to hear how you use these Adobe tools in your everyday workflows.

Watch this brief eLearning module on how to use the Acrobat.com plug-in for MS Outlook to share large files. Just click the image below to display the module in a new window.


Contributing Editor:
Phylise Banner

Phylise is an
instructional designer, educator (AEL), avid angler, and proud owner of a
1967 Amphicar. You can view her LinkedIn profile at http://www.linkedin.com/in/phylisebanner

 

,,,,

HOW TO: Apply Master Pages automatically in FrameMaker

A discussion on LinkedIn about FrameMaker Master Pages prompted me to publish this short post and include an Adobe Captivate how-to video.

Master pages provide consistent look-and-feel across multiple pages that
perform
specific roles, such as the first page of a chapter, or landscape pages that display wide tables or images.
But applying custom master pages to each document page—especially
in a book with hundreds of pages manually can be time-consuming
and tedious
to say the least.

 

tweetmeme_url = ‘http://blogs.adobe.com/rjacquez/2010/04/how_to_apply_master_pages_auto.html';

Starting with FrameMaker 7.0, you can
automate the process of applying master pages by mapping master pages to body pages containing
specific paragraph tags. For example, map a particular master page
to the first page of each chapter based on its chapter heading paragraph

tag, or map a landscape master page to a body page containing a wide table or an image.

Click the image below to view a short (06:31min) Adobe Captivate simulation on how to automate the process of applying customer master pages.

,,,

Incorporating Interactive 3D into Documentation

Today I started my day with a presentation where I was asked to demonstrate our 3D capabilities in Adobe Technical Communication Suite 2 and how 3D models could be incorporated in PDF-based Documentation and also in Help systems.  

tweetmeme_url = ‘http://blogs.adobe.com/rjacquez/2010/02/incorporating_interactive_3d_i.html';
tweetmeme_source = ‘rjacquez';

The positive feedback I received from the participants inspired me to post this short recording of the steps it takes to embed a SolidWorks 3D assembly in PDF via FrameMaker and in a Help systems via RoboHelp.

As always, thank you for taking the time to check out the recording and if you have any comments, leave me a message below and send me a Tweet @rjacquez.

Click HERE to watch the recording of Incorporating 3D in Technical Documentation
(duration: 00:13:50)
.

TIP:
I typically set my desktop resolution to 1024 x 768 for best recording
results, however because I was showing apps, which require high
resolution, you will notice some distortion in the demonstration part
of the recording. Something you may want to try is to click the
“Scroll” button at the bottom left of the Connect Pro window, which
will help you zoom in closer and follow the action around the
presenter’s mouse.  To the right is what the button looks like in all
Connect Pro recordings.

,,,,,,,

Video: Importing vs. Linking in Adobe RoboHelp 8

One of the most frequently asked questions I get from customers is regarding the differences between Importing FrameMaker and/or Word document versus Dynamically Linking these files in Adobe RoboHelp.  

tweetmeme_url = ‘http://blogs.adobe.com/rjacquez/2009/12/video_importing_vs_linking_in.html';
tweetmeme_source = ‘rjacquez';

As I often do when highlighting a particular feature in one of my Adobe apps, I have put together a short how-to video recording to illustrate the differences. The video is only 14 minutes long and can be launched by clicking HERE.

Hope you like it and thanks for watching it and for using Adobe RoboHelp!

,,,,,,

Embedding PDFs in Blogs via Acrobat.com

tweetmeme_url = ‘http://blogs.adobe.com/rjacquez/2009/06/embedding_pdfs_in_blogs_via_ac.html';
tweetmeme_source = ‘rjacquez';

Now that Acrobat.com has moved out of beta and into full production with two new Premium subscription services, I want to take this opportunity to highlight the ability to embed PDF files in a Blog, using Acrobat.com’s “Copy Embed Code” feature, as illustrated below with the embedded PDF:

For my Blog, I use Adobe Contribute CS4 and here’s a short Adobe Captivate 4 how-to movie on how I embedded the above PDF in this post:

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