Understanding and Configuring the Correspondence Management Manage Assets interface

While the out-of-the-box experience of the Manage Assets interface will blow you away, it is worth noting that the interface itself is highly configurable, given that deployments of the Correspondence Management solution may need a different/customized look-n-feel of this interface, based on specific customer requirements.

The overall knitting of the UI components on the interface is done using the AMApplicationSkin.mxml which you can find in the CM Solution Template @ CorrespondenceManagementSolutionTemplate\ManageAssets\src\com\adobe\solutions\cmg\manage\skins\AMApplicationSkin.mxml.

Here’s a quick look at the high-level components:

 

 

 

 

 

 

While what’s shown on the Application Header (the various tab navigators) is largely governed by the (customizable) application’s skin (AMApplicationSkin), the rest of the UI components (i.e., which actions/buttons to be shown on the Application Toolbar, which columns to be shown in the Search Results Grid and which properties to be shown in the Advanced Search panel when searching) are driven by an XML definition, i.e. asset definition FMLs, which require almost no code changes to get yourself a customized UI experience. You will find these asset definition FMLs under /apps/solutions/cm/assetDefinitions in the CRX repository. See snapshot below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note that you will find two sets of FMLs there. Ones that are named [Asset type].fml and ones that are named [Asset type]-publish.fml – the former being the definitions used for the solution’s Author instance and the latter for the Publish instance.

The initial view of the Manage Assets interface lists all assets in the system. That is because the default view has all assets selected for search (“Search all assets” in the Advanced Search panel- see snapshot above). This view uses the Asset.fml descriptor as the UI definition/design. The same descriptor is used when searching for assets across multiple asset types. However, when searching for a specific type of asset (i.e., only Texts or only Conditions, and so on…), the descriptor for that asset type drives the UI definition/design. For example, when searching for Texts only (all other checkboxes deselected), the TextModule.fml drives how the interface looks like.

The FMLs are part of the CM Solution Template (@ CorrespondenceManagementSolutionTemplate\package-resources\apps\solutions\cm\assetDefinitions), and can be modified as required. Once modified, follow the steps to build and deploy the solution template for changes to take effect.

 

Understanding the Asset Definition descriptors (FMLs)

Now that we know the significance of these FMLs, let’s take a look at what’s in there…

The FML has a lot inside it, but we will only focus on what’s relevant towards the Manage Assets UI definition. Let’s take the TextModule.fml as an example here.

The first section of interest is the assetActions item, which defines what action buttons are available on the Application Toolbar when searching for Texts (only). Here’s how the section looks like for Texts:

 

 

 

 

Note the list of actions highlighted (within the grey boundary). Each <action> also defines the User Groups (names) who can perform that action (groupName=”…”),  whether the action is enabled by default or not (defaultEnabled=”…”), and other styling configurations such as the icons to be used in enabled or disabled states, tooltip and label (enabledIcon, disabledIcon, tooltip, label).

The next section of interest would be the various <property> tags. Here’s a snapshot of the name property for Texts:

 

 

 

The set of <property> tags define the properties/attributes that are part of that asset. Each <property> may define whether it is visible as a column in the Search Results Grid (note the visible attribute highlighted in RED), whether it is available as a searchable property in the Advanced Search panel (note the searchable attribute highlighted in GREEN), and other attributes such as the displayName, columnOrder, etc.

So, to add a column in the Manage Assets UI (in the Search Results Grid), you would need to add an additional <property> node for that property (if it does not exist already). Properties could either be one of the existing ones for the asset or a custom property added for that asset.

Overall, to configure the properties to be shown in the Search Results Grid and the Advanced Search panel, you may tweak existing properties and/or add/remove properties to the concerned FML.

 

This was a very generic description of such configurations. You may check out my post which adds a Tags column to the Manage Assets UI for all assets, as an example. You should also check out the public documentation which adds custom properties to assets and displays them on the Manage Assets interface.