Adjust menu font size in the Photoshop CC 2014.2 release

The 2014.2 release of Photoshop CC simplifies how menu font size is determined. Now, to adjust the menu font size in Photoshop, you simply need to tweak the relevant operating system settings.

For example, on Windows 8.1, you can adjust the menu font size by following the steps in the “Make text and other items on the desktop larger” section of this Microsoft Help topic.

Blog-post

Adjusting menu font size in Microsoft Windows 8.1

Further reading:

 

 

Photoshop: Migration and Sync Settings

I ran into a few questions about settings migration on forums and elsewhere, so I thought a blog post might help. Here are two key considerations to keep in mind:

  • Sync Settings synchronizes settings between installations of the same major version of Photoshop. For example, settings are synchronized between a Photoshop CC 14.1 installation and a Photoshop CC version 14.2 installation.
  • Sync Settings does not synchronize settings across installations of different Photoshop major versions. For example, Photoshop CC version 14.1 settings are not synchronized with an installation of the 2014 release of Photoshop CC (technically, version 15.0).

If you want to migrate presets/settings from one major version of Photoshop to another, you can do so in one of the following two ways:

  • When you first launch the newer version of Photoshop, you are prompted to migrate the presets/settings. Choose Yes.
  • At any point in time, select Edit > Presets > Migrate Presets to migrate settings.

Also note that the main preference file is not migrated as part of presets migration.

Further reading

Photoshop keyboard shortcuts reference

Marijan Tompa from the Photoshop user community has created a beautiful PDF reference summarizing Photoshop CC shortcuts. It is embedded right on top of this Help article and inline in this blog post.

We’re sure you’ll find it helpful.

 

 

A closer look at the Photoshop Generator syntax

- Joel Brandt and Samartha Vashishtha

The Photoshop Generator feature offers great flexibility in the ways you can rename layers/layer groups to specify size and quality parameters. Stepping beyond the recommendations in the Help article, this blog post looks at some valid variations that you can use while tagging layer/layer group names.

Before we begin, let’s look at the conventions followed in this blog post:

gradient_suffix-prefix

Space case

  • The filename portion of a layer/layer group name can include space characters. For example:
    250% Foo Bar Baz.gif
    Result: Generates a single file named Foo Bar Baz.gif scaled by 250%
  • While specifying absolute sizes, you can omit the space character between the height and the width. For example:
    100×80 foo.png
    Result: Generates a 100 px x 80 px-sized PNG file named foo.png
  • Do add a space character between the size parameter (prefix) and the layer name. For example:
    100×100 foo.png
  • You can omit the space character following the separator (, or +). For example, any of the following layer names generates two files—foo 1.png and foo 2.jpg—from the tagged layer:
    foo 1.png,foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png, foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png+foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png + foo 2.jpg
  • Do not add a space character between an absolute size dimension and its unit. For example, the following layer names are invalid:
    80 x 100 px imagename.png
    4 in x100 imagename.png
    90 mm x120 cm imagename.png
  • Do not add a space character between the layer name and the suffix. For example, the following layer/layer group name is invalid:
    100×100 imagename.png 5%

Mixing units

While specifying the size parameter, it’s OK to mix and match the supported units—px, cm, mm, and in.

If no unit is specified for a dimension, Photoshop assumes it to be px.

Examples:

  • 80 x 100px foo.png
  • 4in x100 foo.png
  • 90mm x120cm foo.png

Wild cards

While specifying absolute sizes, you can use the ? wildcard in place of a dimension.

Examples:

  • 100x? foo.png
  • ?x60in foo.png

Hyphenated quality parameters

You can add a hyphen before the quality parameter (suffix) to make your layer/layer group names more readable.

Examples:

  • foo.png-8
  • foo.jpg-100%
  • foo.png-32

Some other Don’t’s

  • Don’t use unsupported units.
  • Don’t mix absolute and relative sizes. For example, the following layer name is not valid:
    50% 80×100 foo.png
  • Don’t specify out-of-bounds values. For example:
    foo.jpg-101%
    foo.png-42
    0% foo.png

That’s all for now! Hope you have fun using Generator and other exciting enhancements in the September 2013 release of Photoshop. In case you haven’t already reviewed the What’s New, here’s the link.

 

Photoshop and Behance: The awesome twosome!

ps-be

You can now upload your creative images as work-in-progress to Behance directly from within Photoshop. Behance is the leading online platform to showcase and discover creative work. Using Behance, you can create a portfolio of your work and broadcast it widely and efficiently to get feedback.

Interesting? Read more here.

Images suitable for camera shake reduction

If you’ve played around with the camera shake reduction feature in Photoshop CC, you might have noticed it works best with decently lit still camera images having low noise. The following types of still images are particularly suitable for shake reduction:

  • Indoor or outdoor images captured using a lens with a long focal length
  • Indoor images of a static scene taken with a slow shutter speed and no flash

In addition, shake reduction can help sharpen blurred text in images affected by camera motion.

Here’s the documentation for the feature.

Two new best practice articles now live…

We’ve just published two new articles in the CQ best practice series:

A list of the five articles published so far is at this URL. In the days to come, we’ll post more best practices, tips, and tricks that you can apply to your work.

Stay tuned!

Cloud Manager: How are Pause and Stop operations different?

When you pause a cloud, the cloud provider doesn’t charge for CPU cycles anymore. However, you are still charged for the allocated storage (for example, Amazon EBS volumes). Paused clouds are displayed in the Clouds dashboard with a yellow status.

However, when you stop a cloud, no memory, EBS storage, or instances remain allocated to it anymore. However, online backups for the stopped cloud are still retained and can be restored. The cloud provider continues to charge for the saved online backups. Stopped clouds are displayed in the Clouds dashboard with a red status.

For more FAQ related to Cloud Manager, refer to this documentation topic or consult this forum.

Access custom Microsoft Office properties using LiveCycle services

Marcel van Espen, over at the Dr Flex and Dr LiveCycle blog, explains how you can create a LiveCycle process to access custom Office properties. His blog post also includes a useful example.

“Within LiveCycle Workbench ES, one of the services in the common category that you can use is ‘Export XMP’. This service will extract all the available metadata from a PDF document. If you have converted a MS-Office document to a PDF document, you will be surprised what metadata is also converted. All these properties now become accessible.”

Read the complete post here.

Video demo: Building a corporate Twitter solution using LiveCycle and AIR

In a community blog post, Marcel van Espen from the Adobe presales team demonstrates how you can use LiveCycle and AIR to build a Twitter solution for your organization.

… you can use LiveCycle to build a process and an AIR application to publish tweets to a corporate Twitter account, where you have control on what’s published or not. Part 1 focuses on building the client with Flash Builder 4 with the LC Service Discovery plugin. In part 2 you will see how to archive all tweets in a PDF/A format within LiveCycle Content Services.

Part 1

Part 2