The What A Tip Contest

Adobe Photoshop What A Tip contest: Instructions

If you have been using Photoshop for work or playing with it for fun, you must have got a few tips and tricks up your sleeve. How about sharing them on Twitter so that other Photoshop users learn from you?

Take part in the Adobe Photoshop @WhatATip contest and tweet Adobe Photoshop tips.

  • Contest Entry Opens: April 22, 2014 @ 12 AM PST
  • Contest Entry Ends: May 5, 2014 @ 11.59 PM PST

The winners of the contest will be awarded the following prizes:

  • Contributor of the best tip: Amazon gift voucher worth $150
  • Contributor of the second best tip: Amazon gift voucher worth $100
  • Contributor of the third best tip: Amazon gift voucher worth $75

Entries will be judged on accuracy, originality, and popularity (number of RTs and favorites the tweet receives during the contest period from users other than the contributor). Any number of tips can be contributed by a particular user. See detailed Terms and Conditions at Adobe_What_A_Tip_Contest_Offical_Rules_20140421.

Instructions

  • Read the Terms and Conditions before taking part in the contest.
  • Log on to Twitter and compose a tip as a tweet. Remember to add the #PSTip hashtag and the @WhatATip handle. Click the Tweet button.

A tip can be any smart way of accomplishing a task with the product, for example, using a shortcut or an uncommon workflow. Your tweet can describe the tip completely or can include a link to a tutorial.

Example 1 (a tweet describing a tip):

Control + Option-drag (Mac), Right click + Alt-drag (Win) resizes your brush in Liquify. pic.twitter.com/LBFcDlXmgO#PsTip@WhatATip

Example 2 (a tweet pointing to a publicly available tutorial):

Make water drops look realistic in #Photoshop http://adb.la/1073 #PSTip @WhatATip

For more examples, see the tweets hosted on the Adobe Photoshop Tips page.

If you have any questions, please leave a comment on this blog or tweet your question to @WhatATip

 

Photoshop keyboard shortcuts reference

Marijan Tompa from the Photoshop user community has created a beautiful PDF reference summarizing Photoshop CC shortcuts. It is embedded right on top of this Help article and inline in this blog post.

We’re sure you’ll find it helpful.

 

 

A practical introduction to Web analytics for technical communicators

What analytics parameters do you rely on to track the performance of your technical content?

At the STC India Conference earlier this month; my colleague, Vikrant Rai, and I presented a session that discussed some key content-related parameters. Here is the slidedeck:

A closer look at the Photoshop Generator syntax

Joel Brandt and Samartha Vashishtha

The Photoshop Generator feature offers great flexibility in the ways you can rename layers/layer groups to specify size and quality parameters. Stepping beyond the recommendations in the Help article, this blog post looks at some valid variations that you can use while tagging layer/layer group names.

Before we begin, let’s look at the conventions followed in this blog post:

gradient_suffix-prefix

Space case

  • The filename portion of a layer/layer group name can include space characters. For example:
    250% Foo Bar Baz.gif
    Result: Generates a single file named Foo Bar Baz.gif scaled by 250%
  • While specifying absolute sizes, you can omit the space character between the height and the width. For example:
    100×80 foo.png
    Result: Generates a 100 px x 80 px-sized PNG file named foo.png
  • Do add a space character between the size parameter (prefix) and the layer name. For example:
    100×100 foo.png
  • You can omit the space character following the separator (, or +). For example, any of the following layer names generates two files—foo 1.png and foo 2.jpg—from the tagged layer:
    foo 1.png,foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png, foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png+foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png + foo 2.jpg
  • Do not add a space character between an absolute size dimension and its unit. For example, the following layer names are invalid:
    80 x 100 px imagename.png
    4 in x100 imagename.png
    90 mm x120 cm imagename.png
  • Do not add a space character between the layer name and the suffix. For example, the following layer/layer group name is invalid:
    100×100 imagename.png 5%

Mixing units

While specifying the size parameter, it’s OK to mix and match the supported units—px, cm, mm, and in.

If no unit is specified for a dimension, Photoshop assumes it to be px.

Examples:

  • 80 x 100px foo.png
  • 4in x100 foo.png
  • 90mm x120cm foo.png

Wild cards

While specifying absolute sizes, you can use the ? wildcard in place of a dimension.

Examples:

  • 100x? foo.png
  • ?x60in foo.png

Hyphenated quality parameters

You can add a hyphen before the quality parameter (suffix) to make your layer/layer group names more readable.

Examples:

  • foo.png-8
  • foo.jpg-100%
  • foo.png-32

Some other Don’t’s

  • Don’t use unsupported units.
  • Don’t mix absolute and relative sizes. For example, the following layer name is not valid:
    50% 80×100 foo.png
  • Don’t specify out-of-bounds values. For example:
    foo.jpg-101%
    foo.png-42
    0% foo.png

That’s all for now! Hope you have fun using Generator and other exciting enhancements in the September 2013 release of Photoshop. In case you haven’t already reviewed the What’s New, here’s the link.

 

Very short survey | Help Adobe help you

We are constantly looking at ways to improve the Adobe Help experience, and your feedback is an important part of our revision process.

Here is your chance to provide inputs on how we can improve the Help content and the experience of finding, accessing, and using Adobe Help content.

Take a short survey to give us your feedback. It’s only one page, and will take you just a few minutes.

TakeSurvey

 

 

 

Sincerely,
Adobe Help team

 

Photoshop CC refreshed!

totem-photoshop-cc-150x150.png.adimg.mh.150.mw.150Photoshop CC has been updated with exciting new features and enhancements! See these Help pages to understand what has changed:

What’s New: http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/whats-new.html

Information about the new Generator functionality: http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/generate-assets-layers.html

General Help landing page: http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/topics.html

Photoshop and Behance: The awesome twosome!

ps-be

You can now upload your creative images as work-in-progress to Behance directly from within Photoshop. Behance is the leading online platform to showcase and discover creative work. Using Behance, you can create a portfolio of your work and broadcast it widely and efficiently to get feedback.

Interesting? Read more here.

Images suitable for camera shake reduction

If you’ve played around with the camera shake reduction feature in Photoshop CC, you might have noticed it works best with decently lit still camera images having low noise. The following types of still images are particularly suitable for shake reduction:

  • Indoor or outdoor images captured using a lens with a long focal length
  • Indoor images of a static scene taken with a slow shutter speed and no flash

In addition, shake reduction can help sharpen blurred text in images affected by camera motion.

Here’s the documentation for the feature.

Photoshop CC | The magical camera shake reduction

If I had to put my finger on the Photoshop CC feature that comes closest to “magic”, I’d pick Camera Shake Reduction. For most users, it is the powerful tool that deblurs pictures that got ruined in a sudden shake of the camera. For some, it breathes life right back into memorable moments that can never be captured again. Magic.

Excited? Let’s get you started with using this feature:

  • For detailed step-by-step documentation, see this Help article
  • A video introduction to camera shake reduction is here:

Happy reading and touching up your photos!

Before_After_CSR