New FrameMaker user’s guide: sliced, diced, and enhanced

v2_fm_iconOver the years, many of you from the FrameMaker community shared rich feedback on the content and structure of the FrameMaker user’s guide. We’ve been listening and we’ve spent several busy months acting on the feedback to create an improved user’s guide that meets your content requirements better.

So, what exactly has changed? As we analyzed your feedback, some key themes emerged:

  • Content organization: FrameMaker is a powerful product packed with rich functionality. However, not all users use all of its functionality all the time. While improving the guide, we made a conscious attempt to minimize scattering of information and keep content around related features together. For example, information about using structured authoring features forms two neat chapters in the new user’s guide. This information was spread across several chapters in the earlier user’s guide.
  • Workflow-based approach: The new user’s guide makes it easier for you to just get things done. We’ve tried to step into your shoes and figure out what information you’d need and in what order. That you’d shared useful feedback over the years made our job a lot easier. So, whether it’s managing graphics or single-sourcing content, we walk you through relevant concepts and tasks in an order congruent with FrameMaker workflows. With apologies to Coleridge, might we say, the best content in the best order?
  • Responsive content experience: Content experience is two words—content and experience. We know you’re connected 24/7 and that you access instructional content on your devices. On your desktop, the new FrameMaker user’s guide opens in a little content viewer app of its own. When you access the content on a smaller screen, it is displayed in a responsive layout, ensuring a seamless content experience.

    Viewing the new FrameMaker user’s guide on a smartphone

  • Visual treatment: Wherever possible, we’ve tried to pull down the wall of words that traditional documentation is. So, as you glance through the new user’s guide, expect to see visuals and illustrations that help demystify a complex concept or task. Not sure how you can publish across multiple channels? Well, see it for yourself.
  • Discoverability: You turn to the user’s guide trying to find answers to questions that are blocking your everyday work. That’s why we kept titles in the new user’s guide crisp and the content search-friendly. So, whether you search on Adobe.com or Google, you can expect to find a useful Help article that helps you get back to your work as quickly as possible.
  • Resource ecosystem: We want the new user’s guide to be more than just your first stop for information on everything FrameMaker. We want it to be also the launchpad that propels you to other, often advanced, sources of information on the web. Hop right over to the appendix at the end to view a list of select FrameMaker resources. We promise to keep the list updated as more resources become available.

What we place in your hands today is just the version one of the improved user’s guide. Your feedback has helped us get it to this stage, and your feedback will be pivotal as we try to refine it even further. Keep the wishlists coming; we’re making a careful note of them.

And now that we’ve said enough, here are the links to the new guide:

HTML: http://help.adobe.com/en_US/FrameMaker/12.0/Help/Using/index.html
PDF: http://help.adobe.com/en_US/FrameMaker/12.0/Help/using-framemaker-12.pdf

Happy reading!

Adjust menu font size in the Photoshop CC 2014.2 release

The 2014.2 release of Photoshop CC simplifies how menu font size is determined. Now, to adjust the menu font size in Photoshop, you simply need to tweak the relevant operating system settings.

For example, on Windows 8.1, you can adjust the menu font size by following the steps in the “Make text and other items on the desktop larger” section of this Microsoft Help topic.

Blog-post

Adjusting menu font size in Microsoft Windows 8.1

Further reading:

 

 

A closer look at the Photoshop Generator syntax

- Joel Brandt and Samartha Vashishtha

The Photoshop Generator feature offers great flexibility in the ways you can rename layers/layer groups to specify size and quality parameters. Stepping beyond the recommendations in the Help article, this blog post looks at some valid variations that you can use while tagging layer/layer group names.

Before we begin, let’s look at the conventions followed in this blog post:

gradient_suffix-prefix

Space case

  • The filename portion of a layer/layer group name can include space characters. For example:
    250% Foo Bar Baz.gif
    Result: Generates a single file named Foo Bar Baz.gif scaled by 250%
  • While specifying absolute sizes, you can omit the space character between the height and the width. For example:
    100×80 foo.png
    Result: Generates a 100 px x 80 px-sized PNG file named foo.png
  • Do add a space character between the size parameter (prefix) and the layer name. For example:
    100×100 foo.png
  • You can omit the space character following the separator (, or +). For example, any of the following layer names generates two files—foo 1.png and foo 2.jpg—from the tagged layer:
    foo 1.png,foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png, foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png+foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png + foo 2.jpg
  • Do not add a space character between an absolute size dimension and its unit. For example, the following layer names are invalid:
    80 x 100 px imagename.png
    4 in x100 imagename.png
    90 mm x120 cm imagename.png
  • Do not add a space character between the layer name and the suffix. For example, the following layer/layer group name is invalid:
    100×100 imagename.png 5%

Mixing units

While specifying the size parameter, it’s OK to mix and match the supported units—px, cm, mm, and in.

If no unit is specified for a dimension, Photoshop assumes it to be px.

Examples:

  • 80 x 100px foo.png
  • 4in x100 foo.png
  • 90mm x120cm foo.png

Wild cards

While specifying absolute sizes, you can use the ? wildcard in place of a dimension.

Examples:

  • 100x? foo.png
  • ?x60in foo.png

Hyphenated quality parameters

You can add a hyphen before the quality parameter (suffix) to make your layer/layer group names more readable.

Examples:

  • foo.png-8
  • foo.jpg-100%
  • foo.png-32

Some other Don’t’s

  • Don’t use unsupported units.
  • Don’t mix absolute and relative sizes. For example, the following layer name is not valid:
    50% 80×100 foo.png
  • Don’t specify out-of-bounds values. For example:
    foo.jpg-101%
    foo.png-42
    0% foo.png

That’s all for now! Hope you have fun using Generator and other exciting enhancements in the September 2013 release of Photoshop. In case you haven’t already reviewed the What’s New, here’s the link.

 

CQ Cloud Manager is here!

Adobe has announced the general availability of CQ Cloud Manager, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) that enables reduced time and costs for provisioning, managing, and metering Web Experience Management (WEM) solutions supporting digital marketing initiatives. Cloud Manager takes advantage of cloud computing technology, such the Amazon Web Services (AWS) public cloud, to start up CQ clusters quickly and consistently.

Using CQ Cloud Manager, Digital Marketing organizations can provision and deploy instances of their Web environment without having to procure hardware or pay large upfront costs. This ease of provisioning allows enterprises to rapidly engage customers, drive market shares, and focus on innovation.

The infographic below captures the overall CQ Cloud Manager framework:

 

To know more about Cloud Manager or to learn how to use it, refer to the documentation.