Embed a TOC in a FrameMaker document

FrameMaker iconLet’s discuss an easy way to embed a file-level TOC in a FrameMaker document. We’ll generate a standalone TOC for the document and then import it by reference into the same document.

Here’s how:

  1. Open the FrameMaker document.
  2. Click Special > Table of Contents. When FrameMaker prompts if you want to create a standalone TOC, say Yes.
  3. In the Set Up Table of Contents dialog, select the paragraph tags that you want to include in the TOC. Click Set. FrameMaker creates a separate TOC file and stores it in the directory where your FrameMaker document is stored.
  4. Open the new TOC and format it as necessary. You may want to change the font styles/sizes for the TOC paragraphs and set tab stops/leaders.
  5. 1.jpg

  6. Now, open the parent FrameMaker document, place the cursor at the intended insertion point (usually the beginning of the file), and then click File > Import > File. Select the external TOC file and click Import.
  7. Retain the default settings in the Import Text Flow by Reference dialog box and click Import. FramaMaker imports the TOC by reference into the parent document.
  8. 2.jpg

Now, whenever you update the external TOC, simply select the embedded text inset in the parent document and click Update in the Text Inset Properties pod.

3.jpg

Here’s some further suggested reading:

Find: Much beyond text…

FrameMaker iconYou can use the Find/Change feature in FrameMaker to look for many different kinds of objects across a book or in a document.

Find.jpg

In particular, Find Unresolved Cross Reference saves me grueling hours of troubleshooting when I’m generating PDFs.

Read more about the search functionality in FrameMaker in this Help article. For tips and best practices on creating PDFs from FrameMaker documents, see this handbook.

Download the free PDF production handbook

Creating a final, print-quality PDF from FrameMaker documents can be an involved, multi-step process. We thought it would be useful to capture all relevant considerations and steps in a single handbook that could be immediately put to use in real-world situations.

The following sections are included in this handbook:
  • Relevant scenario
  • Prerequisites
  • Important considerations
  • Equip yourself with relevant details
  • Stage 0: Prepare the content
  • Stage 1: Clean up the source
  • Stage 2: Prepare the book and create PDF
  • Stage 3: Test the PDF
  • Stage 4: Prepare the PDF for publication
  • Stage 5: Optimize the PDF in Acrobat
  • Appendix: Best practices for using conditional text
  • Appendix: Keeping track of content changes across versions in a collaborative environment
Click this link to download the handbook: pdf_handbook.pdf.

And yes, feel free to share it with your colleagues and friends!

Don’t forget to clear those change bars!

You must remove the change bars in a book before generating the final PDF for publication. Note that change bars appear again if you flatten the text insets in the book after clearing all change bars. For more information about using change bars in FrameMaker efficiently, see http://bit.ly/ju6xw.

To clear the change bars in a book, follow these steps:

  • Select Format > Document > Change Bars.
  • Select Clear All Change Bars | (No Undo) and then click Set.

change bars.jpgTo flatten the text insets in the book before setting out to clear change bars, follow these steps:

  1. Open the book file and open all files in it.
  2. Select all files in the book. Now, in the book view, click Edit > Find | Any Text Inset.
  3. Double-click the first text inset that you find and click Convert to Text.
  4. Repeat step 3 for all text insets in the book.

text inset search.jpgFor information about searching text insets and other items in FrameMaker 9, see http://bit.ly/NpiOn. For information on how to manage your text insets best with FrameMaker 9, see http://bit.ly/XUTll.

Important:
Flattening text insets involves book-level changes that are difficult to reverse. It is recommended that you flatten text insets only in a local copy of your content and not in the central copy administered through a version-control system.

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