Adobe @ Women in Cybersecurity 2016

Adobe was a supporter of the Women in Cybersecurity (WiCys) conference again this year. This year’s conference was organized by Tennessee Tech and held in Dallas, Texas. We had a great experience over the three days of the conference which saw women from across industry and academia come together to discuss important security topics and encourage more women to pursue careers in security. Adobe was joined by several major industry peers including Google, Facebook, Cisco, and IBM.

The conference provided a good mix of technical and non-technical sessions. First off was a keynote by Heather Adkins, Director of Information Security at Google. She talked a little bit about how she became the first woman hired in an operational role at Google and also the first woman on Google’s corporate security team. She then discussed her ideas for structuring an incident response organization. Key components of a good incident response organization per Ms. Adkins are: 1) Figure out what happened (forensics), 2) Are we still under attack (Monitoring), 3) Who did it (Threat intelligence), and 4) Restoring the business (Remediation). It was helpful to hear how another large peer organization like Google handles incident response.

One of the workshop sessions we found most interesting was on the topic of “Big Data Analytics for Cyber Security Applications.” It discussed how to leverage big data frameworks in the field of cyber security. The workshop taught us how to create smaller data sets from the huge amount of threat intelligence information received nowadays and process the data sets using tools such a Hadoop or Spark. It also described the varying levels of sanitization and risk associated with using different malware data sets. Data sets in academia are highly sanitized, and low risk, but typically out-of-date. Research data sets are moderately sanitized and have moderate risk associated with download, but are more current. Individual malware collections are the least sanitized, and have the most risk associated with download, but are up-to-date. Adversaries are thus actively modifying their patterns of behavior to avoid detection (polymorphism) – so multiple techniques and tools are needed to adapt our defenses.

We particularly enjoyed the non-technical sessions that included women leaders in the industry talking about their career journey and how they got to where they are today. Particularly impressive was the talk by Shelley Westman, VP of Operations and Strategic Initiatives, from IBM. Shelley talked about the various stages of her career and experiences as a woman at each of those stages. Shelley also discussed the importance of building relationships with male allies who will support opportunities for women in the workplace.

The conference also had some great networking opportunities during the social events hosted by several companies. We got a chance to attend one hosted by Facebook and participate in a “lean-in” circle conversation. We also attended the Cisco event where we had great interactions with their security team and got to learn more about their security and trust organization.

It was a great conference again this year and we’re happy that Adobe continues to support organizations working to make more opportunities available for women in our industry.

Disha Agarwal
Product Security Manager

Jeanette Azevedo
Security Engagement Specialist

Comments are closed.