Posts tagged "incident response"

OWASP, IR, ML, and Internal Bug Bounties

A few weeks ago, I traveled to the OWASP Summit located just outside of London. The OWASP Summit is not a conference. It is a remote offsite event for OWASP leaders and the community to brain storm on how to improve OWASP.  There were a series of one hour sessions on how to tackle different topics and what OWASP could offer to make the world better. This is a summary of some of the more interesting sessions that I was involved in from my personal perspective. These views are not in any way official OWASP views nor are they intended to represent the views of everyone who participated in the respective working groups.

One session that I attended dealt with incident response (IR). Often times, incident response guidelines are written for the response team. They cover how to do forensics, analyze logs, and other response tasks covered by the core IR team. However, there is an opportunity for creating incident response guidelines which target the security champions and developers that IR team interacts with during an incident. In addition, OWASP can relate how this information ties back into their existing security development best practices. As an example, one of the first questions from an IR team is how does customer data flow through the application. This allows the IR team to quickly determine what might have been exposed. In theory, a threat model should contain this type of diagram and could be an immediate starting point for this discussion. In addition, after the IR event, it is good for the security champion to have a post mortem review of the threat model to determine how the process could have better identified the exploited risk. Many of the secure development best practices recommended in the security development lifecycle support both proactive and reactive security efforts. Also, a security champion should know how to contact the IR team and regularly sync with them on the current response policies. These types of recommendations from OWASP could help companies ensure that a security champion on the development team are prepared to assist the IR team during a potential incident. Many of the ideas from our discussion were captured in this outcomes page from the session: https://owaspsummit.org/Outcomes/Playbooks/Incident-Response-Playbook.html.

Another interesting discussion from the summit dealt with internal bug bounties. This is an area where Devesh Bhatt and myself were able to provide input based on our experiences at Adobe. Devesh has participated in our internal bounty programs as well as several external bounty programs. Internal bug bounties have been a hot topic in the security community. On the one hand, many companies have employees who participate in public bounties and it would be great to focus those skills on internal projects. Employees who participate in public bug bounties often include general developers who are outside of the security team and therefore aren’t directly tied into internal security testing efforts. On the other hand, you want to avoid creating conflicting incentives within the company. If this is a topic of interest to you, Adobe’s Pieter Ockers will be discussing the internal bug bounty program he created in detail at the O’Reilly Security conference in New York this October: https://conferences.oreilly.com/security/sec-ny/public/schedule/detail/62443.

Lastly, there was a session on machine learning. This has been a recent research area of mine since it is the next natural step of evolution for applying the data that is collected from our security automation work. Adobe also applies machine learning to projects like Sensei. Even though the session was on Friday, there was a large turnout by the OWASP leaders.  We discussed if there were ways to share machine learning training data sets and methodologies for generating them using common tools.  One of the observations was that many people are still very new to the topic of machine learning. Therefore, I decided to start by drafting out a machine learning resources page for OWASP. The goal of the page isn’t to copy pages of existing introductory content onto an OWASP page where it could quickly become dated. The page also isn’t designed to drown the reader with a link to every machine learning reference that has ever been created. Instead, it focuses on a small selection of references that are useful to get someone started with the basic concepts. The reader can then go find their own content that goes deeper into the areas that interest them. For instance, Coursera provides an 11 week Stanford course on machine learning but that would overwhelm the person just seeking a high-level overview. The first draft of my straw man proposal for the OWASP page can be found here: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWASP_Machine_Learning_Resources. As OWASP creates more machine learning content, this page could eventually be a useful appendix. This page is only a proposal and it is not an official OWASP project at this stage.  Additional ideas from the workshop discussion can be found on the outcomes page: https://owaspsummit.org/Outcomes/machine-learning-and-security/machine-learning-and-security.html.

OWASP is a community driven group where all are invited to participate. If these topics interest you, then feel free to join an OWASP mailing list and start to provide more ideas. There were several other great sessions from the summit and you can find a list of outcomes from each session here: https://owaspsummit.org/Outcomes/.

Peleus Uhley
Principal Scientist

Adobe @ the Women in Cybersecurity Conference (WiCyS)

Adobe sponsored the recent Women in Cyber Security Conference held in Atlanta, Georgia.  Alongside two of my colleagues, Julia Knecht and Kim Rogers, I had the opportunity to attend this conference and meet the many talented women in attendance.   

The overall enthusiasm of the conference was incredibly positive.  From the presentations and keynotes and into the hallways in between, discussion focused on the general knowledge spread about the information security sector and the even larger need for more resources in the industry, which dovetailed into the many programs and recruiting efforts to help more women and minorities, who are focused on security, to enter and stay in the security field.  It was very inspiring to see so many women interested in and working in security.

One of the first keynotes, presented by Jenn Lesser Henley, Director of Security Operations at Facebook, immediately set the inspiring tone of the conference with a motivational presentation which debunked the myths of why people don’t see security as an appealing job field.  She included the need for better ‘stock images’, which currently portray those in security working in a dark, isolated room on a computer, wearing a balaclava, which of course is very far from the actual collaborative engaging environment where security occurs.  The security field is so vast and growing in different directions that the variety of jobs, skills and people needed to meet this growth is as much exciting as it is challenging.  Jenn addressed the diversity gap of women and minorities in security and challenged the audience to take action in reducing that gap…immediately.  To do so, she encouraged women and minorities to dispel the unappealing aspects of the cyber security field by surrounding themselves with the needed support or a personal cheerleading team, in order to approach each day with an awesome attitude.

Representation of attendees seemed equally split across industry, government and academia.  There was definitely a common goal across all of us participating in the Career and Graduate School Fair to enroll and/or hire the many talented women and minorities into the cyber security field, no matter the company, organization, or university.   My advice to many attendees was to simply apply, apply, apply.

Other notable keynote speakers included:

  • Sherri Ramsay of CyberPoint who shared fascinating metrics on cyber threats and challenges, and her thoughts on the industry’s future. 
  • Phyllis Schneck, the Deputy Under Secretary for Cybersecurity and Communications at the Department of Homeland Security, who spoke to the future of DHS’ role in cybersecurity and the goal to further build a national capacity to support a more secure and resilient cyberspace.  She also gave great career advice to always keep learning and keep up ‘tech chops’, to not be afraid to experiment, to maintain balance and find more time to think. 
  • Angela McKay, Director of Cybersecurity Policy and Strategy at Microsoft, spoke about the need for diverse perspectives and experiences to drive cyber security innovations.  She encouraged women to recognize the individuality in themselves and others, and to be adaptable, versatile and agile in changing circumstances, in order to advance both professionally and personally. 

Finally, alongside Julia Knecht from our Digital Marketing security team, I presented a workshop regarding “Security Management in the Product Lifecycle”.  We discussed how to build and reinforce a security culture in order to keep a healthy security mindset across a company, organization and throughout one’s career path.  Using our own experiences working on security at Adobe, we engaged in a great discussion with the audience on what security programs and processes to put into place that advocate, create, establish, encourage, inspire, prepare, drive and connect us to the ever evolving field of security.  More so, we emphasized the importance of communication about security both internally within an organization, and also externally with the security community.  This promotes a collaborative, healthy forum for security discussion, and encourages more people to engage and become involved.

All around, the conference was incredibly inspiring and a great stepping stone to help attract more women and minorities to the cyber security field.

Wendy Poland
Product Security Group Program Manager

Collaboration for Better Software Security

At Adobe we have found that building working relationships between developers and vulnerability researchers is to the benefit of everyone–including, and especially, the general public. We will be speaking this week on this topic at the SOURCE Seattle 2012 conference. In our talk we’ll share case studies of successful developer-researcher collaboration by examining examples of security incidents including bug reports, zero-day attacks, and incident response.

If you’re going to be at SOURCE Seattle please drop by our talk: “Why Developers and Vulnerability Researchers Should Collaborate” at 12:10pm on Thursday, September 13. We’re eager to share what we have learned from our developer-researcher collaboration. And, of course, we especially look forward to catching up in hallway conversations!

Cheers,

Karthik Raman, Security Researcher, ASSET
David Rees, Lead Developer, Acrobat 3D

Straight from the Source: SOURCE Boston

Karthik here from Adobe PSIRT. My colleague from the Adobe Acrobat team, Manish Pali, and I will be speaking next week at the SOURCE Boston conference. In our talk, we’ll cover some of the processes behind incident response at Adobe, including our security community outreach via the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP), and automation strategies and solutions from the trenches for new and known vulnerability reports.

Demo alert! Manish is going to demo one of his tools for incident-triage automation—we’re hoping this and other aspects of the talk will benefit our friends on other incident response teams.

Please swing by our talk, if you’ll be at SOURCE Boston. We look forward to catching up in hallway conversations.

See you in Boston,

Karthik

Presenting “Malware Classifier” Tool

Hi folks,

Karthik here from Adobe PSIRT. Part of what we do at PSIRT is respond to security incidents. Sometimes this involves analyzing malware.  To make life easier, I wrote a Python tool for quick malware triage for our team. I’ve since decided to make this tool, called “Adobe Malware Classifier,” available to other first responders (malware analysts, IT admins and security researchers of any stripe) as an open-source tool, since you might find it equally helpful.

Malware Classifier uses machine learning algorithms to classify Win32 binaries – EXEs and DLLs – into three classes: 0 for “clean,” 1 for “malicious,” or “UNKNOWN.” The tool extracts seven key features from a binary, feeds them to one or all of the four classifiers, and presents its classification results.

The tool was developed using models resultant from running the J48, J48 Graft, PART, and Ridor machine-learning algorithms on a data set of approximately 100,000 malicious programs and 16,000 clean programs.

Malware Classifier is available at Open @ Adobe.

I will be speaking about the research behind the tool at Infosec Southwest 2012 in Austin, TX, on April 1. If you’re going to be there, I look forward to meeting up and discussing product security and secure engineering at Adobe.